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Man-Eaters of Eden, The: Life and Death in Kruger National Park

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"Robert Frump weaves the central story of human suffering with, in the case of "The Man-eaters of Eden," gripping accounts of horrific lion attacks. He's a master story-teller who leaves readers wondering what they enjoy most: the import debate of "man versus nature" or the many gruesome tales of predator versus prey."

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Data sheet

Author Robert R Frump
Cover Type Paper-back
ISBN 10 1-920169-17-2
ISBN 13 978-1-920169-17-6
Number of Pages 158
Size A5
Binding Perfect Bound

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"Robert Frump weaves the central story of human suffering with, in the case of "The Man-eaters of Eden," gripping accounts of horrific lion attacks. He's a master story-teller who leaves readers wondering what they enjoy most: the import debate of "man versus nature" or the many gruesome tales of predator versus prey."
--John von Brachel, deputy managing editor of Time Inc. Custom Publishing.

"A masterful account of encounters between man and beast....a stunning portrayal of a little-known phenomenon -- the killing and eating of Mozambican refugees by the lions of Kruger National Park in South Africa. This is a richly detailed narrative that is brutal and honest. Anyone intersted in wildlife preservation and human rights should read this remarkable book."
-- David Zucchino, correspondent for The Los Angeles Times and author of "Thunder Run" and "Myth of the Welfare Queen."

"The Man-eaters of Eden" is a much-needed antidote to the Diseneyfication of African wildlife. Robert Frump portrays lions as neither virtuous nor villainous but as what they are: adaptable carnivores...As Frump shows, its not so much the lion the bush we should fear; its our simplistic, theme-park view of nature."
-- David Baron, author of "Beast in the Garden."

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly
According to Frump, lions in South Africas Kruger National Park today "are killing people three times as often as fifteen years ago"; they are attacking, killing and eating refugees fleeing into the country from Mozambique by way of the park. Expanding on an article he wrote for Mens Journal, Frump (Until The Sea Shall Free Them) offers a deftly written study of the parks 2,000 lions and the refugees, and "the crossed paths the two species traveled." Frump delivers a dispassionate examination exploring how "efforts by conservationists to preserve lions are directly resulting in the loss of human life" due to an inadequate governmental response to the continuing refugee crisis. He balances first-person accounts of his travels in the Kruger and his attempts to literally walk in the same path as the refugees with sharp and fascinating portraits of Africans such as John Kohza, one of the first of what Frump calls "the modern surge of refugees through Kruger" in the 1970s. Kohzas flight from the horrors of Mozambican famine and persecution is one of the books emotional high points. (Aug.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist
When on a safari in South Africa, journalist and author (Until the Sea Shall Free Them, 2002) Frump began to hear rumors of lions attacking and eating people, mostly refugees from Mozambique, in Kruger National Park. Kruger is on the border between South Africa and Mozambique, and its remote location presents the best way for the poor to enter South Africa, seeking both safety and jobs. But the emigres must also run the gauntlet of Krugers 2,000 lions. As Frump tells the story, the roles of heroes and villains blur: the victims are illegal aliens and therefore not "heroes," the bad guys are lions just doing what comes naturally to them, so they are not really "villains," and the parks rangers are caught in the middle as they try to protect one of the worlds great parks despite its one unintended, lethal consequence. Frumps intention was to examine the problem of lions and refugees dispassionately, and in this he succeeds. The narrative style encompasses solutions for solving the problem. Nancy Bent
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