List of Stories
Person
Number
Story Added By/
Email Address/
Date Added
2Jef, as we knew him, died in a Ratel ICV accident while on a practical driving route. The Ratel was on the downhill side of a mountain pass, and had to move over to the far left of the dirt road to allow a fully laden timber vehicle pass. The shoulder of the road gave way under the Ratel and it rolled down hill and landed on it's roof. If memory serves me correctly, Jef was the "gunner" on the vehicle, and was pinned in the hatch, when the Ratel landed on it's roof.
Another member of our squad, Cpl Dries Blom also died in this accident.
RIP, good friend.
Anton Dekker
antondek@gmail.com
2010-10-18 15:42:50
102Lt Alves was a troop commander in the Anti - tank sqn of 32 Bn commanded by then Maj Hannes Northmann. Due to tactical circumstances, his troop got stuck in the mud of a shona near the Lomba River during a tank fight, and his Ratel 90 was destroyed at point blank by a T55 tank. 2Lt Alves, his crew as well as 32 Bn members such as Capt Mac McCallum was killed instantly. the tank round penetrated the Ratel through the side door, detonated in the main ammunition storage container and resulted in an explosion causing the vehicle to catch fire.

2002-08-14 21:49:14
10These were brave men that died for there country however what was it for? I am 36 years old and was there in 1987 and to this day I do not know why, God bless you men of honour Carlos Rosa

2003-03-17 01:52:56
10Hi my name is Gavin Vorster and i was in 32 from 1987 to 1989 we were once soldiers and i salute all that was part of my unit and all those that sacrified their lives for a better world,for those that lost their lives i salute you, Proleo Procusi_ We were forged in war. For my Friend fuchi,man you were tough,hope god the old man is looking after you up there. Gavin Vorster
gjv@honeydew.ferreiras.co.za
2008-11-09 16:56:48
10even though the rattles and mrl's served 4 months in angola as part of 32 in ops modula we hardly mentioned. we trained and lived 32 but the fallen where never put on record, just a piss up at buffalo. we know what u did.s. taylor

2008-12-02 22:29:38
10S.TAYLOR IT IS P.PRATT WHERE ARE YOU?P.PRATT
pcp@vodamail.co.za
2009-04-24 12:18:31
10people are soldiers. we will live an depart with honourjoe
jflenczek@hotmail.com
2010-12-28 21:32:49
10people are soldiers. we will live an depart with honourjoe
jflenczek@hotmail.com
2010-12-28 21:44:47
10

On 13 September 1987, during Operation Modular in southern Angola, a 32 Battalion anti-tank Ratel commanded by 2Lt J.R. Alves was engaged in combat with FAPLA T-55 tanks, and became bogged down in a muddy shona. Before the men could extricate themselves, their Ratel was hit and destroyed by a T-55 tank, killing all the crew and men aboard the Ratel, including 2Lt Alves and Capt A.D. McCallum, the commanding officer of Foxtrot Company.       

Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2011-01-11 13:10:26
10

13 Sep 1987: Six members of 32 Battalion were Killed in Action in a single incident during Ops Modular in Southern Angola.

A 32 Battalion Anti-Tank Ratel 90, Callsign 13, Commanded by 2/Lieutenant Jose Raymond Alves became bogged down in a muddy shona while engaging FAPLA manned Soviet T-55 tanks. Before the men could extricate themselves, their Ratel 90 was hit and destroyed at point blank by a Soviet T-55 tank shell. The tank round penetrated the Ratel through the side door and detonated inside the main ammunition storage container. This resulted in an explosion within the Ratel causing the vehicle to catch fire. The Ratel crew and passengers were all killed instantly in the explosion. The burnt out Ratel was later destroyed by SADF Engineers to prevent its capture. Captain Alfred Desmond McCallum was the Commanding Officer of Foxtrot Company.

Those Killed in Action were:

  • 74316175PK Captain Alfred Desmond McCallum. He was 28
  • 83502815BG 2/Lieutenant Jose Raymond Alves. He was 20.
  • 83302422BG Lance Corporal Matthys Michael De Klerk. He was 20.
  • 832441178BG Trooper Marthinus Johannes Kuyler. He was 20.
  • 81533671SP Lance Corporal Joao Rodrigues Mananza. He was 33.
  • 76928621SP Lance Corporal Waite Tchipango. He was 31
Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-15 01:59:08
11Trooper S.M. Anderson was killed in an Eland armoured car accident near Novo Redondo in Angola, on 17 December 1975, during Operation Savannah. His fellow crewmen, Troopers S.M. Palmer and J.T. Lawson, were both injured in the same accident.

Information extracted from Avontuur in Angola by Sophia du Preez (J.L. van Schaik 1989)
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2009-11-08 08:28:10
12Military Vehicle Accident

2002-11-25 08:42:01
14

14 Sep 1985: 80080898PC Sergeant Peter Henry Anthony from 8 SAI was killed when his Buffel Troop Carrier overturned near Etale Base. He was 25.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-16 01:23:01
14My father died on 14 September 1985 on my 8th birthday, they day he was suppose to return home from the border. I am turning 40 this year and always wonder what our lives would have been like if he survived. You left behind a very young wife, myself and little brother. You are our Hero Daddy and we miss you. You will always be in our hearts. Sanovia Jacobs (daughter)
sanovia.jacobs@santam.co.za
2017-08-18 03:06:11
21

Near Nkongo Ovamboland. After passing a waterhole near a village his platoon was ambushed. Some soldiers were still drawing water. Appelgryn and Victor where hit. Recoilless rifles were used and vehicles, so this was no small enemy force. Three quarters of the platoon were wounded. Appelgryn was hit in the shoulder and the round hit his shoulderblade and went into his lungs. When his mate got to him he told him to leave him and to help the more badly wounded chaps. He died shortly after.

Unknown
Unknown
2004-07-02 23:26:17
21

This incident was 54 battalion which was 5 SAI BN. We operated from Nkongo, Elundu and Eenhana. Ops Intel was over 45 enemy attacking divided into 3 flanks. A very bad day.

S.M.Cronje
shipshapeusa@cs.com
2007-01-04 06:08:06
2209 Sep 1990: 89072623CK Rifleman Derio Arendse from the 2nd Battalion South African Cape Corps was critically injured in a military vehicle accident on 07 September 1990 and succumbed to his injuries in hospital on 09 September 1990. He was 26.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-09 00:22:52
25Rifleman Ashford passed away as a result of a shooting accident at the Riemvasmaak training facility.Tony de Andrade
tonydea@live.com
2016-09-13 12:44:16
25I was there at Riemvasmaak when it happened. A terrible accident, where one of the guys accidentally discharged his rifle one evening while all of us were sitting around chatting. We tried to stop the bleeding, but the bullet had entered his back, through his chest, and got lodged in his thumb. A night I will never forget.Adriaan van der Ploeg
adyvdploeg@gmail.com
2017-06-06 23:52:52
26Peter (Punchie) Atherton was a Jeppe Old Boy. He was a gentle kind kid. I considered him to be one of the nicest you could meet. Not many people know that Peter Atherton was an amateur boxer of note. I regret the fact that Brian Mitchell forgot about Peter. As an amateur, Peter Atherton boxed with Brian. I believe that had Peter not been killed during National Service, he would undoubtedly have ranked among our greatest boxers ever. Peter was blessed with determination and grit, he also possessed a deep humility, but above all, Peter stood above Brian in one crucial respect, he had a knockout punch. Hence the nickname (Punchie). RIP Punchie, I remember you with fondness and respect still to this day.BW
sacfm@corpdial.co.za
2011-05-25 16:51:39
26I was there when Peter was killed in a stupid, careless accident near Jan Kempdorp. If there were correctly trained medics present, his death might have been avoided. I remember that even the ambulance battery was dead. The price we paid...for what?
JH
anon@gmail.com
2011-12-15 08:04:06
28Steve (28) and Porto (510) were 2 good guys who were a laugh when we share guard duty. We also liked it when Steve's family came to visit on a Sunday as he had a lovely sister who we all thought was lekker!! Porto came from Sea Point and his father ran a cafe on High Level Rd. They were sadly taken away whilst on static duty on Raglin Road in Grahamstown when their Buffel rolled and they were thrown out. May God let their souls rest in peace as they might have gone, but they are not forgotten. RIP. (Echo company '84 to '86, 6SAI)John Airey (Plt5, E Comp.)
johnairey@hotmail.com
2006-09-20 15:09:05
35

Operasie Kropduif (die aanval op Eheke) op 28 Oktober 1977, sou die donkerste dag in die geskiedenis van die Suid Afrikaanse Spesiale Magte se bestaan wees.

Nadat die Suid Afrikaners aan Angola onttrek het in 1976, sou Swapo die geleentheid gebruik om operasionele basisse bykans teen die SWA grens te vestig. Hierdie basisse is vanaf twee groter streeks hoofkwartiere ondersteun. Cassinga sou die sentrale deel van Swapo se aanvalle op die SWA grens ondersteun, en Eheke die oostelike deel van Owamboland en die Kavango.

Daar is besluit om Eheke eerste aan te val. Drie kompanies van die nuwe 32 Batteljon sou te voet oor die grens, en Eheke vanaf die suide aanval. Op dieselfde tyd sou ?n groep van die Verkennings Kommando?s, noord van Eheke afgeooi word, en met eerstelig die basis uit die noorde aanval.

Alles het van die begin verkeerd gegaan. Die Spesiale Magte is sowat 15 kilometer te ver noord uit die vliegtuie gelaat. Om dinge verder te kompliseer was die terrein plat en sonder bakens. Eers teen dagbreek was die verkenners in ?n situasie om sinvol te kon navigeer. Toe Drie Twee nog ook halfpad na die teiken, teen ?n verwoede Swapo mag vasloop is daar met reg gevra of die operasie nie afgelas moes word nie. Ook veterane soos Sers Maj FC van Zyl vra vrae. Die bevelvoerende offisier Brig Gleeson, in Rundu het teen die beter wete van die grond bevelvoerders besluit dat die operasie moes voortgaan.

Toe gebeur ?n volgende tragedie. Eheke het uit ?n groter kompleks bestaan as wat die foto interpretasie kenners raak gesien het. Behalwe vir die basis in die suide was daar ook ?n basis in die noord ooste. Hierdie kompleks is totaal misgekyk. Teen drie uur die middag loop die verkenners in ?n trop beeste vas. Die veld was bebos maar onder is die hout en dekking verwyder. Die bees wagtertjie wys na die loopgrawe voor hulle.

Die Operateurs vorm ?n linie met die ondersteunings groepe na agter. Aan die linkerkantste buite flank is Michiel ?Vingers? Kruger met ?n RPG, dan aan sy binnekant, Gert Eksteen met ?n LMG, dan FC van Zyl, Wentzel Marx met ?n LMG, Gary Walker met ?n RPG, Grant Clark, nog een, dan Antonie Badenhorst en dan Luit Chris Strydom. Aan hulle regterkant is nog groepe besig om vorentoe te beweeg. Dan bars alle hel los. Die seksie aan die linker flank het vasgeloop in die deel waar die basis se loopgrawe 90 grade wegswaai van die lyn van die aanval. In plaas daarvan dat hulle soos die res van die aanval die vyand frontaal aanval, loop hulle hulle vas in ?n vuur nie net van voor nie maar ook van die kant. Amper soort van verby die loopgrawe geloop!!

Hierdie toeloop van gebeure sou die lewe van ses jong mans kos. Letterlik binne sekondes. Die eerste om te val was FC van Zyl, die man wat die res van die seksie geinspireer het toe niemand meer lus was nie. Bykans op dieselfde oomblik sterf Vingers Kruger, die man heel buite op die flank. Tussen hulle twee stoor Gert Eksteen se LMG. Hy gaan sit op sy hurke om sy wapen se probleem uit te sorteer. Toe sy regterhand aan sy wapen raak, skiet ?n projektiel hom net bokant sy regter middelvinger deur sy hand. Sy wapen ook stukkend. Aan die regterkant gaan dit nie beter nie. Wentzel Marx, Gary Walker, Grant Clark, Antonie Badenhorts sneuwel almal. Luit Strydom word ook gewond. Gert Eksteen het nerens om heen te gaan nie. Hy haal sy pistool uit en veg met sy linkerhand verder. Op ?n stadium word twee van die ander groep deur ?n RPD masjien geweer vas gepen. Hulle kan hom nie raak skiet waar hy agter ?n boom le nie. Toe die gunner weer om die boom kruip skiet Gert Eksteen hom met sy pistool dood.

Met durf en determinasie veg die aanvallers teen die oormag en wen stukkie vir stukkie die stryd. Gert Eksteen is nie meer nodig nie. Sy hand bloei te veel. Hy beweeg terug, waar hy Kapt Meerholz aantref met ?n skoot deur die been. Hy help Meerholz so aba-aba terug na die mediese pos. By die mediese pos pluk hy sy middelvinger wat net aan ?n velletjie hang af en gooi dit in die Angolse stof. Sy hand word verbind. Hy gaan terug na sy gesneuwelde makkers en bring hulle een vir een terug.

Ek glo nie Gert Eksteen het die storie ooit vroeer aan enige iemand vertel, voor die Maandag aand in Januarie 2004. ?Ek het my hand by die werk in ?n ongeluk seergemaak? sou hy altyd se as iemand hom vra. Meer wou ek nie vra nie. Ek was op ?n baie persoonlike en privaat gebied. Maar ek is dankbaar. Helde almal van hulle, maar medaljes word ongelukkig nie in getalle toegeken nie, al is die dapperes ook ?n seksie van agt Recces. Hulle kon maar vir almal van hulle gegee het. Daardie dag is net 3 Honoris Crux toegeken. Corrie Meerholz sou een kry.

Leon
leonbez@lantic.net
2007-02-12 21:03:49
36

Baadie was tragically killed when the Caspir he was travelling in rolled on the road from Ombalantu to Ondangwa.I spoke with him the night before the accident. He was Bravo Coy, 1 Parachute Battalion. 

RIP Baadie   

David Thompson
dawiet1@msn.com
2009-08-14 05:41:49
38Joachim and myself enrolled at 10 Art Brigade in Potchefstroom January 1983 and became best mates. One day we were assigned to repair broken tables he operated a grinder and I held the table soon my great brown pants caught alight and my army shorts underneath melted into my leg. We since me receiving medical treatment by the medics we inseparable until the day he died I was in the buffel with him Gnr. LR.P. Roux 80279946BG.GNR LR.P Roux 80279946BG
lroux@imperialauto.co.za
2017-01-24 11:22:03
39

De Brug - Shooting insident - Accident

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-21 10:40:34
42

Military Vehicle Accident.

Listed as "Bango, C." on Klapperkop

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2002-11-25 08:39:30
45

I remember: he was a friendly mortarist named barries, I was the barman, we were all innocent 18 year old kids not knowing we could die, his death was sudden and unreal

paul
paulb@urbanconcept.co.za
2011-06-15 15:14:35
45I remember buddies well ,we trained together in H company 4 sai ,after mortar training we where moved over to delta on 3 platoon company together .Our mortar troop split in half,the other half going over to c company,having completed training in September 1981 our company deployed to SWA .We as motars had a relatively easy going time when compared to our infantry brothers being base camp 81mm mortar home guards. In 1982 our 14 day pass came up and us mortars where sent in groups with the platoons heading state side buddies went along with one of the first groups and on his return came passed eco water  tower where a group of 4 sai ,and myself where deployed, he was in good spirit having just arrived from the airport,having left eco tower the group buddies found himself with where routed  to a potential contact site ,on arrival ,from what news came back via radio and the personal that where with buddies, contact was made with a group of swapo having a beer at a mud hut come beer hall ,having arrived at the scene in buffels the group gave chase on foot later returning to the vehicles buddies was apparently leaning over the side of the buffle  (vehicle)  he had being in on arrival,a member on the ground ,making his weapon safe let a round off ,this hit buddies ,choppers arrived to take buddies to ondungwa  but it was already to late,he passed away later that night.I never got to say goodbye that day to Eddie.so young so fucking wrong REST IN PEACE my old friend
E hardman
hardman@telkomsa.net
2012-06-28 09:26:24
45 Stumbled onto this site by accident. I was next to him on that buffel when it happened. We were the guys on foot chasing and when we got back the buffels arrived with some guys on board. I was put up there with the MAG to cover the area and some guy on the ground (from base camp, not a member of the group chasing), was given an instruction by some corporal (also from base camp) to make his rifle safe. We could not believe it, in a contact zone and this guy was told to make safe by some corporal from base! I was actually staring at this guy when he let the round off, and Barnard was hit. The rest is history. Dont know what else to say, what a waste. So sorry.John
john@leslie.co.za
2012-07-10 07:48:13
45I remember in 1980 we were ambushed and I was wounded. I wil never forget the coward that did not fire a single shot! A real rambo in base but a real coward when we were in the ambush! The tracker told me afterwards we should have shot him. Anyway it is in the past! Never trust a rambo! The driver saved our lives that day- 30 clicks from Oshigambo! Harry
accuray2000@gmail.com
2015-01-29 11:36:36
46If this is the J Barnard that i served with he was killed at Epupa falls in the Kokoveld(sector 10 ) in May/ June of 1987. He was out on a mine hunt with his team and a CPL Corrai when the buffel in which they were traveling hit a land mine. the buffel fliped over. Both Cpl Barnard and his closed friend Corria were killed. They were from SWA Genni and only had 2 week to go before returning to 911 to train the next intakCraig ex cpl 102bn
craigo@europassistance.co.za
2006-12-19 00:33:02
46

Sadly this is not the late comrade I thought it was.

Barnard and Corria from SWAGENI  /102BN names are not to be found on any list

Or memorial wall I checked. Sad that lives are lost and they go unrecorded

 

Craig
craigo@europassistance.co.za
2011-04-14 05:35:47
46

I would also like to know who this Barnard is, was he the guy that did JL's with me in 1986 at Bossiesspruit near Kroonstad.I later heard that he died in a mine accident but I could never confirm it. Barrie's was part of the SWA forces and he along with Tillo von Brandis were send to the SA in 1986 for training.I have some photos of him that I would like to give to his family.   

Pieter Swart
pieters@ladismithcheese.co.za
2012-04-01 01:10:57
50

Russel was one of a number of paratroopers that was in a Puma Helicopter when it was shot down by enemy forces, all the occupants of the chopper died that die.

Apie
dvl@mweb.co.za
2006-06-28 15:11:13
50

One of a squad of Parabats from 1 Parachute Battalion, he was flying in a SAAF SA-330C Puma helicopter, # 132, which was transporting men from 1 Parachute Battalion, when the helicopter was shot down by enemy 23 mm AA fire south-east of Cuvelai in Angola, crashing inverted. None of the Parabats or SAAF crew survived. The Parabats who died that day are commemorated on the Wall of Rememberance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein.

Peter
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2007-12-31 04:57:44
50

Russel was my room mate at boarding school at Klerksdorp Techinical High School in 1980, the year we wrote Matric. We played hockey together and he was a great friend and up today we miss him. Rest in peace Russel.

Apie
dvl@mweb.co.za
2010-08-24 22:22:14
50

This was the day that real men cried. Tears fell from every troop and every officer at 1 Para, when the announcement of the downing was made, but you would not look any of them in the eye to witness their sadness.

I was busy with Basics (Delta '82).  We all assembled on the Parade Ground and cried for Brothers, we never met, but were never-the-less Our Brothers.

I am one of the "boys" in the photographs on 18 August 1982, standing up-right while the Last Tattoo and Reveille was played out and clearly remembering that there were no tears when Rev Moore, quoted Sir Winston Churchill's famous speech from the 2nd Word War.

It was surreal. We volunteered for the Elite Paratroopers, and on that day, before finishing Basic Training, we were already at war, but were not yet ready to go to war.

On this day, every "boy" became a "man". No-one cried on that Parade Ground, in front of Our Brothers Parents, while we honored our fallen Brothers.

It was one of the scariest moments of my life, knowing that when we left Bloemfontein for the Border, any-one of us could be next to have his name carved into the Memorial Wall.

It is with sadness that I was not able to join my Brothers on the Border as a Parabat, but managed to regularly cross their paths, meeting them at various destinations after moving into other active duty on the Border.

I salute all our lost Brothers and once again shed my tears, knowing irrespective of what gets said or who has said what about the dedication and selfless sacrifice of all our Brothers who ever served their Military Service, if I could have the chance, I would do it all over again.

Fighting soldiers from the sky
Fearless men who jump and die
Men who mean just what they say
The brave men of the Maroon Beret

Silver wings upon their chest
These are men, South Africa's best
One hundred men will test today
But only three win the Maroon  Beret

Trained to live off nature's land
Trained in combat, hand-to-hand
Men who fight by night and day
Courage peak from the Maroon Berets

Silver wings upon their chest
These are men, South Africa's best
One hundred men will test today
But only three win the Maroon Beret

Back at home a young wife waits
Her Maroon Beret has met his fate
He has died for those oppressed
Leaving her his last request

Put silver wings on my son's chest
Make him one of South Africa's best
He'll be a man they'll test one day
Have him win the Maroon Beret.

http://youtu.be/FxqjXg6By20

Claren Condon - Delta '82
cono@wbs.co.za
2011-09-13 22:48:13
51

Barrington was a rifleman from 6SAI, Foxtrot Company, Platoon 4 and was a pleasant well mannered and popular chap. As company signal officer I was in transit and detached to this platoon on that fateful rainy night. The platoon was in position for an ambush set up to stop insurgency from the north. Shortly before nightfall I received orders from HQ advising that we should expect insurgents from the south, I questioned the commanding officer and got my worst tongue lashing ever in the process, stupid engelsman etc. I conveyed this information to the platoon commander. During the night there was heavy rainfall, in order to relieve himself Barrington walked out of the ambush position in a sotherly direction, on his return to his position and in the pouring rain a comrade mistakingly shot him. Platoon 4 comprised the youngest group of men who were exposed to the most amount of contacts during our 18 months on the border, as a result of this they were quick on the trigger. This incident had a severe impact on morale not to mention the poor chap who pulled the trigger, he unfortunately had to accompany Barrington in a helicopter whilst travelling with Barrington alongside him. The spirit of Foxtrot Company and the bonds between the men of the company strenghthened, we were brothers.

Cpl Borros 32charlie
angelo@uniterm.co.za
2010-12-19 22:58:46
51Hallo ,ek was nie self daar nie ,maar dit was in my peloton in Foxtrot .Dit was nie n aangename periode nie .Ek hoop almal betrokke kan vrede maak daarmee .Groete Arnold BothaArnold Botha
arnold@anbvet.co.za
2015-06-10 01:08:33
51Hallo ,ek was nie self daar nie ,maar dit was in my peloton in Foxtrot .Dit was nie n aangename periode nie .Ek hoop almal betrokke kan vrede maak daarmee .Groete Arnold BothaArnold Botha
arnold@anbvet.co.za
2015-06-10 01:08:41
51Remembering Richard Barrington. He was in 6thSAI ,not 8 SAI. The name is Wayne Rees 79497012BT, was also in platoon 4 on the cutline when this sad event happened.It occurred at about 02.10 in the early morning.We were all taking turns to stand guard (1 hour),in a large circle,sleeping 2 in a group. A watch was passed on to the next group of 2 and so on.I think Richard completed his shift and handed over the watch to the next group and went to the toilet(which was a common thing to do),however with the rain beating on the trees and bushes,it made for eery,almost disturbing sound. This, think is what made people edgy and also whilst trying to sleep,and the moonlight probably clouded over. However,what angered me then and to this day is the fact that the helicopter or vehicle that fetched him only arrived at about 11 am that morning.We(the guys) had to move him around in the shade(out of the sun) from 7 am that morning till 11. I can recall when an enemy,terrorist,whatever he was called,was killed,they were picked up very quickly and removed. This was 32 years ago and not one year goes by that I dont think of Richard and my friends and comrades in arms. Rest well Richard. Wayne M Rees
waynerees1963@gmail.com
2015-06-14 09:11:40
51BORROS DIT IS ANNA EK WAS MAG GUNNER SAAM MET PRINSIE JOOSTE EN SEYER WAS SAAM MET ONS EK EN SEYER HET KLEIMORS OPGESTEL ON WAS SAAM MET LT LIGHT RICHARD EN SY MAAITJIE JY WEET WIE DIT WAS ON HET SOO VER NOG SOONTOE GELOOP VAN ONKONKOLO AF ONS HET OP DIE KAPLYN SEEKER N DRIE WEEKE INGEGRAAF EK EN RICHARD HET GEREELD IN PAS TYD GEKUIER HY WAS N COOL OU ONS HET NET TRUG GEKOM VAN PAS ONS HET OP DIE VLEE NOG ONS LAASTE OPLEIDING GEKRY CLIVE JONKER EN BERRINGTON HET VIR OP GEBOKS IN PE EK ONTHOU GOED ONS HET DEUR DAAI WATER PANNE GELOOP .ONS HET DEUR DIE WATER GELOOP TOE STOP ONS VIR BREAK AGTER DIE PAN EK EN RICHARD HET GE CHAT TOE SE HY VIR MY ANNA EK GAAN NIE WEER HUISTOE NIE JY WEET MOS PARTYKEER HET ONS MOS MAAR SOO GEWONDER EK ONTHOU NOG GOED EK VIR HOM GESE HET NEE MAN MOENIE SOO SE NIE HY HET SY BOOTS UITGEDROOG EN VIR MY SOO GEKYK EN GESE DIT IS WAAR ANNA WAS LT BREYTENBACH ONS LT EK WAS WAKKER TOE ONS DIE DRIE SKOOT HOOR ONS HET OP DIE RADIO VIR JOU GEHOOR TOE JY SE BERRINGTON IS GESKIET WAS JOOSTE BY JOU EK ONTHOU DAAI VERSKRIKLEKE VREES WAT OOR MY GEKOM HET N EEN VAN MAGTELOOS TE VOEL AL HET JY DIE BESTE WAPENTUIG TOT JOU BESKIKING NIEMAND HET DAAI NAG GESLAAP DIE CHOPPER KON EERS DIE VOLGENDE OGGEND VIR HULLE KOM HAAL EK ONTHOU NOG SERS SEYER SE GESIG DAAI OGGEND EEN VAN RAADELOOSGEHEID BEER HET MOS OP DAAI SELFDE KLEIMORE SY BEEN VERLOOR OP DIE KAPLYN DAWIS HET MOS DAAI GRENAAT OPGETEL EEN VAN DAAI SWARTIS WAS DIT DIE EERSTE KEER WAT ONS IN ANGOLS IN WAS NIE DIT WAS NIE N LEKKER OPS NIE MAAR DIT IS NOU MAAR SOOS DIT IS ONS MOES MAAR DIE WERK DOEN .DIT WAS NIE MAKLIK NIE .GROETE MEDE SOLDAAT ANNA CA BREYTENBACH
cabreytenbach@gmail.com
2014-08-18 17:37:50
54

Cpl Basson died after suffering serious burns in a mortar attack (phosper) His family was from Namibia but he attended school in Paarl

Unknown

2004-03-08 11:54:26
54

Died of wounds - died after suffering serious burns in a mortar attack (Phosphor) - Etale - Freak accident

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-21 11:03:29
58

Peter was educated at Michaelhouse in Balgowan, KZN, where he was a noted hockey player. He was called up to Medics in July 1981 to Klipdrift, Potchefstroom, where he completed basic training. From there Peter commenced his Ops Medic training at 1 Military Hospital and then SAMS College, Voortrekkerhoogte, where he completed the course in March 1982. He was posted to Rundu on the SWA Border and returned back to Pretoria in September 1982. He was tragically killed in a car accident, and was survived by his parents who lived north of Johannesburg, and an older brother and sister.

Steve Addison
saddison@tpg.com.au
2011-03-21 05:51:16
58At 19, Pete was too young to be taken away from us.  I realize that both our parents carried a far heavier weight that either of them ever let on, and managed to convince both myself and my sister that restarting our lives in another country was the best for our future. They were not wrong, but what an incredible step to take having lost a very special son. Pete's uniform hangs in our cupboard today, and he lives on through the special moments that inexplicably and randomly arise, through a look, or a word or a gesture, from my sons and my sister's son and daughter. Michael and Jeanette Beard, Oakville, CanadaMichael Beard
michaelbeard@cogeco.ca
2012-06-01 20:02:35
58At 19, Pete was too young to be taken away from us.  I realize that both our parents carried a far heavier weight that either of them ever let on, and managed to convince both myself and my sister that restarting our lives in another country was the best for our future. They were not wrong, but what an incredible step to take having lost a very special son. Pete's uniform hangs in our cupboard today, and he lives on through the special moments that inexplicably and randomly arise, through a look, or a word or a gesture, from my sons and my sister's son and daughter. Michael and Jeanette Beard, Oakville, CanadaMichael Beard
michaelbeard@cogeco.ca
2012-06-01 20:02:43
58My brother Pete only lived to be 19 years old. In the short time that he was with us, he left indelible marks on all of our lives, through his beautiful nature and special spirit. We share the same birthday - June 30th - 5 years apart, and even though I was most unhappy about that as a young girl, Peter's and my relationship grew very strong over the years, and it was with much joy and celebration that we shared our birthdays as young adults. I miss him every day of every year - but most of all on the day we were both born. I so regret that my husband and children never met this wonderful young man. Their lives are defintely poorer for not having experienced his gentleness, humour and wisdom. Cathy Minnaar
cathy.minnaar@cogeco.ca
2012-08-01 06:59:41
60

A number of ex-Rhodesian soldiers, now serving with the SADF since Zimbabwean independence, were located in camps in the Northern Transvaal. The SADF recruited and trained these men, primarily for sabotage operations designed to destroy infrastructure, damage the economy and undermine the military capacity of Zimbabwe's armed forces.

This series of planned operations, called Operation Drama, had the objective of ensuring that the new Zimbabwe government did not provide concrete support to the ANC and PAC in their armed struggles.

Sgt Robert Trevor Beech was a member of a team of 18 SADF soldiers, sent into Zimbabwe on a clandestine mission. They were ambushed by the Zimbabwean army 40 miles inside Matabeleland, and three men, including Sgt Beech, were killed in the ensuing fire fight.

Peter Chapman
chappiep@hotmail.com
2006-03-07 05:59:32
6113 Sep 1990: 88202551BG Private Warren Ralph Beech from 1 Military Town Management Fire Department was accidentally killed when he fell from a fire tower at Voortrekkerhoogte during fire practice drills after his safety shackle failed. He was 19.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-15 01:19:24
62

Cpl Beechey was attached to 1 Special Service Battalion. He was killed in an aircraft crash along the Silva Porto ? Lobito Road when the task force was heading to Lobito. He was an observer in the aircraft that was looking for enemy positions. The reason for the crash was not known.

Mike James
Mjames0255@msn.com
2008-11-20 11:04:44
64

Hi John, I am the son of Maj N Beetge.
I would just like to correct some info that you have on him.
He died in a plane crash in 1971 into Table Mountain.
It was going to be the first time that the SAAF was going to show the public their new Murcurises plane (spelling unsure).
According to the newspaper it was quite misty that day and they were about 4 km off course, they headed straight for the mountain which was discovered too late by the leading plane, as they pulled up they were too low to clear the summit and crashed just behind the Rhodes memorial.
There were 11 people killed that day. We do have a book that my Aunt made with all the newspaper clips on the crash.
His last unit was with 24 squadron at Pretoria.
Beetge Lourens

Beetge Lourens
NAF@dwaf.gov.za
2003-04-15 11:17:11
64

Hi My name is Gerhardus Beetge I was born in 1971. this is quite a coincidence.

GJ Beetge
gerhardb@bytesms.co.za
2007-01-12 13:57:41
64

Hi Lourens,

I hit on this " web site' by mistake. I was a SAAF Candidate Officer in 1963, & was on the same Flying Instructors course as your dad. He was then a 2nd Lt. There was also a third cadett that used to fly with us, & he was JJ le Roux, who was killed in a Harvard crash in the mid 1960`s.,/p>

In 1966, I left the SAAF, & joined SAA where I flew till retirement in Nov 2004. I attended one of the funerals from that illfated crash. That was George Euverard.

Did you do any flying after you left school?

Garth Liggett PP course 1962.
Garth Liggett
liggett@kingsley.co.za
2009-04-01 18:32:56
65 Kenneth was a farm lad from Hilton, just out of school. He was trained as an infantryman and sent to the SWA border in 1973. His life was needlessly lost when the ratel he was travelling in overturned, and he was crushed under the vehicle. Awful waste of yet another young life. 18 years old R Carr
b.m.m@global.co.za
2010-02-04 21:55:41
66Colonel Bekker was pilot and at one point was the Officer Commanding Comops (a division of SAAF Intelligence mainly dealing with propaganda) at South African Air Force Headquarters. I served under him as a Lieutenant and also flew with him on occasion the last time being on the 28th of May 1987. He left Comops and as far as I remember went back to general flying duties. He was a regular pilot flying South African Air Force Museum aircraft during the time I knew him.Jeremy Havard
inpoint@optusnet.com.au
2017-10-16 20:16:51
67Killed in action on 12 January 1979; landmine explosion at Etale.Peter
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2010-07-01 11:53:42
68

Harry was killed on the border at RUNDU in SWA. His brother Charles was in the front vehicle and he in the second one. They detonated a land mine in the road and the second vehicle was blown up. 7 young white men, 2 coloured and 2 black men were killed.

After much deliberation this was the first time that news was released to the press concerning our many young men who had perished on the border.

Harry and Charles had signed up for a second stint on the border just a few days before his death.

Ann Tiran
anntiran@polka.co.za
2009-07-02 17:14:27
71I crossed paths with L/Cpl. Bell in basic training (B Company, 1 Parachute Battalion, July 1978 intake). I'm not familiar with the circumstances surrounding his sacrifice. Rfn. A. Immelman
immelman@charter.net
2008-05-13 20:12:00
71D Coy were walking at night and Eitieen was point, ter was hiding in a bush and shot him in the head from behind. Unable to get choppers in as it was dark and Eitieen died after a few hours.Hilton Way
heway1@xtra.co.nz
2012-11-29 12:15:40
71D Coy were walking at night and Eitieen was point, ter was hiding in a bush and shot him in the head from behind. Unable to get choppers in as it was dark and Eitieen died after a few hours.Hilton Way
heway1@xtra.co.nz
2012-11-29 12:20:45
71D Coy were walking at night and Eitieen was point, ter was hiding in a bush and shot him in the head from behind. Unable to get choppers in as it was dark and Eitieen died after a few hours.Hilton Way
heway1@xtra.co.nz
2012-11-29 12:25:46
71LCpl E. Bell was the LMG group leader on the left flank of for Valk Group 1 who were in a spread out line of the box formation we had structured our Company at 18:45pm on 6 July 1979. I am 2 Lt HD Mac Millan of Valk Group 3 on the left flank of the box formation who had moved up to go through a gap in the bushes ahead of us the bush had obscured the view of his Valk Group 1 and also my view of my Valk Group 3, in the exact twilight time of 18h45 as we took the gap my friend and fellow paratrooper E. Bell was 3m ahead of me and as he stepped over a fallen tree stump shots rang out and seeing tracer round making contact with him I responded and was able to shoot one of the two enemy we make contact with, it was the low-light of my entire life and I continue to pray and remember E.Bell, All my love to his family xx   Harold Mac Millan
rei@mweb.co.za
2013-02-24 04:35:02
72Was killed in a morter attack at Katima on 23/8/1978Tim
tim.f@polka.co.za
2008-01-24 14:03:11
72My name is Bobby Thomson. I was in Katima Mulilo that night. I was a gunner and served at the mortar locating radar (32 Loc Battery)which was situated on a tower next to the heli pad. The second red eye landed between us and the helipad . We then directed fire onto pre-listed targets along the river and in Sesheke and the guns at golf wiped out all their long and medium range weapons within the first 10 - 15 minutes after the attack. I remeber that we were in a direct line between Golf firebase and some of the targets in Zambia. We would see the firing of the guns, then hear the shells come overhead and her the explosions when they landed. Lt Schalekamp gave mopping-up fire orders the next day. The next day we went to look at the bungalow and what we saw remained with me for many a year after that.Bobby Thomson
warringtons@eccsystems.co.za
2011-07-30 10:40:23
73

Always remembered as a friendly and quite person.

Sad day that he left us,so could not help but remmember him and been on my mind for years,as I was injured 6 weeks later.

Stephen Janse Van Rensburg(paratroopersky@hotmail.com)
Stephen Janse Van Rensburg
paratroopersky@hotmail.com
2001-06-28 23:49:44
73

Recall that Mark walked into a ambush and was hit in the head,while operating with fellow Pathfinders.

Know that he comes from Humansdorp,around a 100 km outside of Port Elizabeth.

Stephen Janse van Rensburg
Stephen _jvr@yahoo.com
2009-01-18 12:51:03
73I just want to say that the person number 73 was Melvin Benecke and NOT Mark as mentioned in one story and that Melvin was from a small town in the Eastern Cape called ALICEDALE and NOT Humansdorp.

Malvin matriculated at the Brandwag Highschool in Uitenhage. He was a true soldier and a warrior and will always be remembered.
Nico
tomahawkirq@yahoo.com
2010-09-10 14:57:36
73Melvin Benecke: I was in standard 9 when he was in matric in the hostel of Brandwag High School in Uitenhage, in 1985. He very much wanted to be in the recces or valskermbataljon and convinced me to be his exercise buddy while he trained in matric to be fit for the army. We set our alarms for about 5 in the morning before school, and then went out first for a 2 or 3 km run and then pull-ups and push-ups, and he ran around with me like a bag of potatoes across his shoulders to get fit and strong. so it was a big shock to hear the news 2 years laterFrancois
francoiswilliams369@gmail.com
2015-07-26 03:49:07
75

In the early hours of Thursday 18 February 1982, SAS President Kruger, oldest of the three Type 12 Frigates of the South African Navy, collided with the replenishment vessel, SAS Tafelberg. Both ships were severely damaged but TAFELBERG returned safely to Simon?s Town. President Kruger sank approximately two hours after the collision when efforts to keep her afloat failed.

14 men from Mess 12, Chief Petty Officers J B Booysen and W M G van Tonder; Petty Officers S A Bothma, G A Brind, R C Bulterman, G W de Villiers, E Koen, H Lotter, R A McMaster, R F Skeates, H W Smit, W R Smith, M B R Whiteley and C J Wium died in the collision and their bodies went down with the ship. A further two men, Chief Petty Officer D Webb and Able Seaman G T Benjamin, lost their lives after the collision and whilst abandoning ship. Of these last named two only CPO Webb?s body was recovered after being sighted by SAS Protea on the morning of 19 February.

See the full story in Three Frigates by Rear Admiral Chris Bennett SAN (Ret)

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2006-06-11 01:15:16
76

During Operation Savannah, on 23 November 1975 WO2 Benson was one of 100 South Africans who were part of a force of 400 men involved in an attack from Edo to Conde in Angola.

After the Eland armoured cars leading the attack had come under enemy fire and become bogged down, the 81 mm and 107 mm mortar teams attempted to relieve these, but the 81 mm crews in turn came under fire and suffered a number of casualties.

2Lt van Niekerk, in charge of the 107 mm mortars, directed his men to fire ahead of the 81 mm crews to assist them, but the enemy then proceeded to shell the two 107 mm mortar positions.

All but one member of their non-South African crews promptly fled but WO Benson and one other South African WO, as well as 2Lt van Niekerk, took over and continued to fire on the enemy.

It was whilst doing so that a shell exploded close to their position, severely wounding 2Lt van Niekerk and mortally wounding WO2 Benson.


Information extracted from Cross of Honour by Ian Uys. Uys Publishers 1992.

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2008-01-25 04:39:31
76

WO Benson was in charge of a platoon of mortars operated by UNITA soldiers. On 24 November 1975 our group was ambushed by Cubans north of a town called Ebo. During the engagement, his position was struck by a mortar or a 122mm rocket which killed the entire platoon. His body was recovered and returned to South Africa.

Mike James
Mjames0255@msn.com
2008-11-20 10:05:20
76This happened on the 23rd November 1975. Battle at EboMark Goller
markantgol@gmail.com
2015-07-03 06:49:02
76WO AJ Benson was my father youngest brother. And yes he died at a young age but we will always remember him as he died in service of his countryRoua Coertzen (Benson)
roua.coertzen@harmony.co.za
2017-07-26 05:19:54
78

A number of ex-Rhodesian soldiers, now serving with the SADF since Zimbabwean independence, were located in camps in the northern Transvaal. The SADF recruited and trained these men, primarily for sabotage operations designed to destroy infrastructure, damage the economy and undermine the military capacity of Zimbabwe's armed forces.

This series of planned operations, called Operation Drama, had the objective of ensuring that the new Zimbabwe government did not provide concrete support to the ANC and PAC in their armed struggles.

Sgt Peter David Berry was a member of a team of 18 SADF soldiers, sent into Zimbabwe on a clandestine mission. They were ambushed by the Zimbabwean army 40 miles inside Matabeleland, and three men, including Sgt Berry, were killed in the ensuing fire fight.

Peter Chapman
chappiep@hotmail.com
2006-03-07 06:04:46
80Your information on the location and it being a hand grenade accident is correct. We were in 1 SAI  and members of the then called O&O Wing(later called Mechanised Leader Wing). Incidently, the shoulder flash dispayed on this page is not correct. This shoulder flash is the flash of 1 SAI when the Unit was still situated in Oudtshoorn, hence the ostrich feathers. When the Unit moved to Bloemfontein, the flash changed, displaying the number "1" prominently in the middle. During the time of the accident the flash was a Honey Badger (Ratel), standing on its hind feet. 

At the time of the accident I was a few meters behind Bester. We were busy with "loopgraaf opruiming" training. The excercise is difficult to explain, but it entails the soldier throwing a handgrenade into the trench, with him following just after the explosion, occupying the position. The rest of the soldiers move past and repeat the drill at the next position. A grenade was thrown, Bester entered the position and immediately climbed out of the trench, bent forward and lay down. We immediately started cardio-pulmonary resucitation and continued until a doctor arrived, declaring him dead. We never felt any pulse. We speculated that he crouched too near(actually just past) the corner of the position to be occupied, thus exposing himself to the explosion.  He also held his head to one side instead of bending it down to his chest for protection. We were wearing our steel helmets. His death was especially  unfortunate as we used  "no 7" training handgrenades [This in brief is a hand grenade of which the fragmentation "cover" is removed, making it like a BIG cracker with few metal parts, used in this format for training purposes.] He sustained only one very small injury(a small hole not much larger than a sigarette butt), just to the left of the middle of his chest, where one's heart is. In my opinion this was an unfortunate freak accident.  I have a photograph of the group that went before us, taken just after a grenade exploded.
Rian Odendaal
raden@e3.co.za
2012-09-06 11:13:20
81

Corporal H P "Klasie" Bester (20) from Kempton Park and Mr Louis Fourie (farmer) from Tsumeb were shot dead by SWAPO in an ambush on a farm 15 km south of Oshivello. Klasie and Mr Fourie, a father of seven were killed on Friday night at 19h30 on 7 May 1982 while herding cattle.

Chris Bester
johan12@emirates.net.ae
2009-01-30 17:29:15
81

Ek herleef weer die aand van 7 Mei 1982, al was ek net ses jaar oud, sal ek nooit vergeet wat gebeur het nie. Ons was vannaand (28 Sep 2009) 5 mense bymekaar wat daardie aand op die plaas Ruimte was. Vir Bes en die ander wat hulle lewens vir ons opgeoffer het, DANKIE, aan julle dink ons nog 27jaar later.

Jaco Steyn
jaco.steyn@travelcounsellors.co.za
2009-09-28 23:09:24
84

Was shot during a rare night attack by SWAPO near Ombalantu (Owamboland).

Assigned to do the regular 8 day "Yeti" patrol duty, his platoon's overnight patrol camp was ambushed and the SADF suffered 5 casualties that night, Beukes was the only fatality. Although seriously wounded, Beukes might have survived if casevac had been carried-out earlier. A call for helicopter evacution from Oshakati was turned down due to obvious risk-factor (night flight etc.). However soldiers "refreshing" at "A" Company HQ (Ombalantu) at the time, immediately volunteered to attempt to evacuate casualties via "unimog", but the order to allow this was substantialy delayed due to incompetence of dithering senior rank.

On the contrary investigative evidence strongly indicated that SWAPO had taken their wounded and probably dead comrades (if any) with them.

Quite demoralising actions at the time, after all what was it all about and what was the final achievement?

LJ
LAlturas@aol.com
2006-12-13 03:33:50
84That day we set out on patrol 24.12.77 was just a normal days work for us. We set up a position hoping to ambush, but it ended up us been ambushed. I was laying next to beakers. I think he was carrying the Bren gun. Well the sky lit up and that was it. We had to wait a long time to be rescued,that I can remember. They got us to Ombulantu then helicopter picked us up and took us to hospital. He was a gentle but strong guy. Rest in peace my mate I will never forget. Robert AntoineRobert Antoine
angelaantoine@aol.com
2014-08-17 13:37:30
85

Died of wounds sustained on the gun position in action near the Lomba River due to catastrophic failure on the gun during high fire tempo engagements on 20th September 1987 during Ops Modular. 6 other Battery members were also injured in the incident.

Gunners' Memorial Trust
jhbgunners.co.za
2012-06-05 08:34:55
85

20 Sep 1987: 85212520BG Rifleman William George Beukman from 4 SAI, attached to 62 Mechanised Battalion Group was Killed in Action near the Lomba River during Ops Modular when a 155mm G-5 High Explosive shell exploded in the breach of the gun, blowing out the breach block and killing him instantly. It appears that the gun barrel was left with half burnt charge in it and another projectile was rammed in that did not seat properly because of the debris in the barrel. Another four members of the gun team were severely injured, losing limbs and being grievously burned when the shell exploded. He was 19.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-20 01:42:21
86

Bezuidenhout lost his life while on guard duty with Gnr Bosse on a farm near Tsumeb, well below the danger line. A small band of terrorists sneaked up on the two and shot them at point blank range. They were both members of 1 Medium Battery, 4th Field Artillery Regiment. Both had Western Transvaal colours in Cricket and Rugby. They grew up together as best friends, and had no family (having been brought up together in a childcare facility)

Unknown
Unknown
2001-05-30 13:37:59
86

Remember him from school, tough as nails think played scrumhalf. Our dads also played cricket for same team. Respect to you comrade. Let us never forget our sacrifices we made for South Africa.

Wayne
7SAI 1984-1986
Wayne
suzukigsxr1000.wayne@gmail.com
2009-03-06 12:49:47
88

Died 20/10/1977 near Sheepmoor.

He was in 15 squad He died flying a super frelon accident He was 31 years old

Unknown

2007-09-17 23:42:34
90

Oorlede in 'n buffel ongeluk, opad terug "states" toe na 3 maande opleiding saam met Infanterieskool. Ek was saam met hom in dieselfde peleton, hy was in die buffel wat voor my gery het toe die "barbed wire" losgekom het van die spaarwiel en in die regter voorwiel verstringel het. Die buffel het omgeslaan en ons het aanvanklik gedink dis 'n landmyn. Ek het die drup op my R4 se loop (blitsbreker) gehaak en dit so hoog as moontlik gehou terwyl hy behandel was, agter op 'n PB se bakkie. 'n Ander baie goeie maat, Pottie het sy een been verloor en later ook die ander een.

Theo Naude
oztheo@westnet.com.au
2006-10-01 16:43:06
91

Mariental - Military vehicle accident

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-21 11:17:32
93

Kevin's Bungalow was hit by a rocket killing him and 9 others at Katemo

Friend
Asaptoday@hotmail.com
2008-01-03 15:43:52
93My name is Bobby Thomson. I was in Katima Mulilo that night. I was a gunner and served at the mortar locating radar (32 Loc Battery)which was situated on a tower next to the heli pad. The second red eye landed between us and the helipad . We then directed fire onto pre-listed targets along the river and in Sesheke and the guns at golf wiped out all their long and medium range weapons within the first 10 - 15 minutes after the attack. I remeber that we were in a direct line between Golf firebase and some of the targets in Zambia. We would see the firing of the guns, then hear the shells come overhead and hear the explosions when they landed. Lt Schalekamp gave mopping-up fire orders the next day. The next day we went to look at the bungalow and what we saw remained with me for many a year after that.Bobby Thomson
warringtons@eccsystems.co.za
2011-07-30 10:42:43
93 I remember it distinctly. The run-up to the attack was as follows: After the successful operation Reindeer and the battle at Cassinga or (Moscow and Vietnam) bases, SWAPO had to do something to save face and they came up with Ops Revenge. The strategy was to attack and annihilate Katima Mulilo, Wenela, Golf and Mpacha. A force of SWAPO and Zambian military personnel and equipment was gathered on the other side of the river and longer range weapons were positioned along the riverbank between Sesheke and their border post "Katima Mulilo" which was situated just across the newly scraped no-mans land from Wenela Base, which in turn was situated at the point where the Zambezi River turns into Zambia and the so-called Kaplyn started. I was a Gunner and at the time part of a mortar locating crew. We had come to the Caprivi around three months before and were first situated at Golf and Wenela. One day we were still quietly going about our business when the Genie invaded our camp and began to dig in the Ops room and other key buildings and positions. At the time we should have realized that something was happening, but no information was passed on to us. A couple of weeks later a third set was flown up from South Africa and a tower was built at Katima to raise the screen up on to. Our group was then moved to Katima and we began registering enemy positions along the riverbank using the Cymbeline Radar Set to do so. At that time, there were no known co-odinates that could be used to survey in any of our gun positions or those of the Radar Set which would be necessary to be able to give adjustments to the guns at Golf and/or, the mortars at Romeo Zulu which was situated out of town along the river. This was soon remedied as a surveying team arrived from SA and used the known co-ordinates at Mpacha as a base and performed what we called then "trekmeet" all the way from Mpacha to the Radar Platform at Katima, the base at Golf and the mortars at Romeo Zulu. At least we were now on the same grid. From these known points a map of the area was drawn and the co-ordinates of the enemy positions were registered onto the map. Seeing as the Cymbeline could also pick up any metal, we could plot the movement of motorvehicles and equipment across the river and even were able to plot dust roads and paths over a period of time as the people and equipment followed the road and the co-ords could be plotted. When equipment stopped moving and stayed at a position, those positions were listed as possible enemy positions and were registered as targets.This information was also updated onto the other maps at Golf and Romeo Zulu on a regular basis. One day, on the way back from Wenela to Katima, a SWAPO soldier walked out of the bush at the side of the road and handed himself over to us. He was bristling with weapons, had a new set of camo???s on and was fully kitted out. He said that he had been promised that he would be able to go to university in Moscow if he joined and spent some time with the ???Freedom Fighters??? . He stated that he had been with Swapo for three years now and that most of that time they had not had much to eat and that the promises that had been made were not realizing. His kit was full of food at the time, which was totally the opposite of what he was saying and he explained that they had just been issued with new kit, weapons, food etc, but that he had had enough and had decided to hand himself over. We took him to Katima and handed him over to the Intelligence Officer at the base and I believe he supplied them with some much needed info concerning the build-up of forces across the river. So we spent our days at Katima, waiting for the end of our stint. As was always the case in later years, the gunners and the guys from the armour regiments befriended each other as both were and would always be minority groups wherever we served. We played many soccer games against each other and so-doing some of us made some good friends with them. If I remember correctly, trooper Elworthy was an excellent soccer player and had been selected for some or other SADF soccer team as well. Our Radar set was situated at the North Eastern corner of the base and the armour guys were situated on the South eastern side. So, the days went by and we heard that the armour guys were going home. One night , just before their ???aflos??? arrived, the guns were fired at some ???targets??? on the Kaplyn as an exercise and I believe a donkey was killed by mistake. A week or two later, their ???aflos??? arrived and the armour guys had a braai on their last night, the 23rd of August 1978. We said Good Bye to them and they carried on with their braai. If I remember correctly, the guys that were leaving were told to bed down in the bungalows opposite the mess and the new guys took up their duties in the vacated positions. We all wen to bed and at 01h15 all hell broke loose. I remember waking up to a searing sound and then hearing an explosion not far from our position. This was the first 122mm red eye fired on us and it landed in a mielie field behind the base. It was most probably the fastest I have ever moved and we got to our positions even before the next rocket fell. To start the generator of the Radar Set, one had to get up onto the platform and start it there. I can???t remember who did, but the set was immediately started up and we waited for the next shots. From our positions we could hear the bang as the rocket was fired, see the flames of the rocket motor raising up into the sky and then the motor died . The second rocket descended and fell on the Bungalow opposite the mess. It broke through the roof and as per some armament specialists later, exploded about 1 meter above the floor in the bungalow. At that specific moment, many guys were either running toward the specific part of the bungalow where the missile would hit, or were leaving the bungalow. The reason for this was that the bungalow was designed with two exits, one on each side of the long side of the rectangular building, which meant that all personnel had to move to the centre of the building. It was exactly at that point where the rocket hit. If the rocket had hit the bungalow first or if a later rocket had hit the bungalow, there would have been far less effect. At the time, we only heard the explosion, but did not know the effect of it. With the radar up and running, we started giving through target co-ords to the guns at Golf. One of the prime targets was the ferry across the river on which SWAPO and the Zambian army were now ferrying troops, equipment and supplies across the river. I believe the guns took out the fully loaded ferry with the second shot, effectively stopping the stream of troops, equipment and supplies from reaching the near bank. I believe that this was most probably the most important shot of the battle and turned the odds in our favour. After that initial target, we gave through co-ords of all the registered positions along the bank and systematically wiped out the positions, one by one. During this period, we would hear the bangs of the rockets being fired, see the ???red-eye??? in the sky and soon learnt if we needed to take cover or not. Some writers about this incident state that it was mortar fire, but as a gunner, we were well aware of what shrapnel from a shell looked like vs the shrapnel we picked up the next day which definitely was not the same and was identified as coming from a 122mm rocket. I am not stating that there was no mortar fire, but the explosions around us were definitely from ???red-eyes???. About 20 minutes later, we had effectively silenced the positions along the riverbank and the guns started firing at targets around the town of Sesheke, which is roughly opposite Katima Mulilo on the far bank of the Zambezi. I remember that there was an officer that was either looking after the civilians or had quite a lot to do with them while bomb shelters were being built on the southern side of their houses. In the town there was a microphone system and he was consistently warning the civvies and appealing to them to move to the shelters and if they did not have one yet, to take cover on the southern side of their houses. He must have come from the Boland as he rolled his RR???s and supplied some sort of comic relief during these hours. We would listen to the radio and when the command to fire was given, look toward Golf. The night sky would light up, looking like an intense lightning storm, moments later we would hear the whistle of the shells above us and then hear the massive explosions as they hit their targets on the other side of the river. Experiencing that was and still gives me goose bumps. The unadulterated destructive power of those shells is absolutely awesome. I must say that after SWAPO and the Zambian army stopped firing on us, the effect of those shots coming over was extremely heart warming. The firing continued sporadically throughout the early hours of the morning as new targets were identified and fired upon. Lieutenant (at the time) Schalekamp, joined us and later climbed up onto the water tower to give us the co-ords of visible targets and corrections once the first shots had been fired. He spent some time mopping up wherever he found anything worth firing upon. Later that morning we were told that we could go and get something to eat and the bad news of the bungalow being hit was heard. On arriving at the mess and seeing the bungalow, my life changed in an instant. The bungalow was a mess. Parts of the building, kit, you name it, was strewn across the ground. There was a guy who had been appointed to keep the vultures at bay. At the time we did not know it, but ten of our friends and comrades had been killed and another 10 or 20 injured. There was blood everywhere. Most of the dead and injured had been removed from the area, but the evidence of the ferocity of the blast was to be seen everywhere. Standing in line for breakfast, the coffee can was positioned long before the food and guys would fill up their mugs while waiting for their food. While standing there that morning, some idiot pulled off a shot and everybody dived for cover with hot tea and coffee flying everywhere and burning some of the guys. We all sat and ate in silence and went back to our positions. What I had seen that morning has stayed with me all my life since. It has influenced many of my decisions in my life. In many cases the effect has been negative. The loss of life of those troopers that night, guys whom you shared a part of your life with, played soccer with, ate with, joked with, worked with, just suddenly gone, left a scar. The next day the follow-up went into Zambia and a day or two later they brought a truckload of bodies back. I wanted to see what these guys looked like and wanted to see their dead, possibly to satisfy a feeling of retribution. I walked over to the truck and getting closer I could smell death. I looked at these bodies, my enemy, and seeing them like that felt no remorse, no sympathy. They were all in various stages of rigor mortise and were later layed out on the parade ground for the intelligence guys to inspect. The base at Katima is quite close to a township and we were told that part of our tasks were to protect the local population. Funny though, that night there was not a single person in the township. They had known and I could not understand why they had not told us, seeing as new were their ???protectors???. For many years I walked around with an ingrown mistrust of all black people as I could not understand the issues. Furthermore, the fact that we had killed some of the enemy never made up for the losses we had had. It felt as if the guys that were killed died in vain. Especially after 1994. It is only now, and I thank Arn Durand for giving me the answer, that I can say the following: No, they did not die as part of a well known Op, firing on the enemy and walking away as heroes into the sunset. But, they died, running to get to their weapons, ready to serve their country, ready to take part in a battle that was never given a name, but surely would have been given one, had SWAPO and the Zambian Army been able to succeed in their strategy of retribution for Cassinga. KJ BIGGS, HW DE LANGE, AH ERASMUS, GP ERASMUS, JL LESCH, JJR SCHUTTE, GJ SMIT, WS SMUTS, AD VAN DER MERWE, DM ELWORTHY, WHC BRITZ Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres, There is music in the midst of desolation And a glory that shines upon our tears. They went with songs to the battle, they were young, Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted; They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them. They mingle not with their laughing comrades again; They sit no more at familiar tables of home; They have no lot in our labour of the day-time; They sleep beyond Englands foam.Bobby Thomson
warringtons@eccsystems.co.za
2015-08-06 03:57:50
95

Eddie was the stopper group with Venter in an ambush in the Jati above Etale near St Mary's. They were attacked from the side and both of them died. He was a very tidy soldier and very popular. His death affected the section deeply.

Mark Steel
theplumber@telkomsa.net
2009-12-15 17:46:53
97Andries Blaauw was from Aroab, South West Africa. In early July 1976 he and his twin brother Pieter were members of an army patrol that had a brief encounter with a group of PLAN insurgents. The latter scattered and were followed up by the patrol. On approaching a kraal where they believed some of the insurgents might be hiding, the section dumped their excess kit and fanned out to search the kraal, leaving Andries and Pieter Blaauw to guard the kit. Apparently, while so deployed, a group of insurgents came upon the two brothers, having followed the army patrol's tracks to the kraal. Andries and Pieter spotted them when they were quite close and, taking cover as best they could either side of a tree, they opened fire on the insurgents. The fire fight lasted only five minutes before the insurgents once again fled, but Andries was mortally wounded during the exchange of fire. Peter Chapman
chappiep@hotmail.com
2006-03-15 08:10:32
100 J W Black
blackman@telkomsa.net
2011-07-26 00:06:48
100Hi,

I would like to say that Blikkies was a very humble person, with a very good sence of humor.
Without going into detail, I would like to mention that he was shot in an ambush close to Rundu on the morning of 04 May 1983, right next to me.
He faught bravely and was a true soldier and according to him, his mothers best looking son.
I salute you soldier


Leon Hildebrand
leon.hildebrand@gmail.com
2011-09-07 13:37:55
102

Eddie Bloem was the Flight Engineer on an Alo III (43) that was doing a night ops from Ondangua on 16 July 1986 when it hit a radio mast at Eenhana. He is well remembered by many: http://www.flyafrica.info/forums/showthread.php?t=12615

Johan Meyer
tazzrat@gmail.com
2008-07-22 20:07:35
102Not Eenhana, and not a radio mast.

The place was Okankolo, 17 57 24 S  016 25 32 E.

They hit a stay-wire holding up a radio mast. It was late afternoon/early evening and the wire was not visible.

Regards...
Fred Viljoen
fredviljoen23@gmail.com
2011-04-06 11:30:53
102In die basis was n groot water toring en ek het bo gestaan en kyk hoe die helikopter inkom om te land in die donker.Langs die aanloopbaan was daar n helipad en om dit was baie sagte stof grond wat baie opgewaai het toe die helikopter wou land.Sy ligte was aan en toe het die stof hom verblind want dit was om soos in digte mis te ry.ek kon sien die helikopter beweeg effens oor die basis en gaan die radiomas tref. die helikopter het geval tussen n klomp tente wat gelukkig leeg was.die vlienier het op een van die tent dakke geval en het n groot swelsel op sy voorkop gehad.ongelukkig was die vlugingeneur baie erg beseer en het n deel van die helikopter op hom gele.almal het gehelp om dadelik medise hulp hop hom toe te pas.In my getuienis voor die ondersoek het ek dit gestel dat dit nie die vlieenier se skuld was maar die rede was dat die area om die helipad nooit met gruis opgevuls was om die fyn stof te keer wat opwaai. dit het dit baie moeilik gemaak vir die vlieenierHardy
hardys@iafrica.com
2017-10-01 13:00:26
103Dries died in a Ratel ICV accident while on a practical driving route. The Ratel was on the downhill side of a mountain pass, and had to move over to the far left of the dirt road to allow a fully laden timber vehicle pass. The shoulder of the road gave way under the Ratel and it rolled down hill and landed on it's roof. If memory serves me correctly, Dries was thrown out from the crew hatch and landed under the Ratel when the Ratel landed on it's roof.
Another member of our squad, Cpl JEF Ashpole also died in this accident.
RIP, good friend.
Anton Dekker
antondek@gmail.com
2010-10-18 15:46:59
104

A flight on the 25th Nov 1971 of WASP 83, that was aboard SAS President Steyn, returning from France for the acceptance of submarine SAS Emily Hobhouse, ended in tragedy. While the ship was in Luanda for a courtesy call, the Wasp underwent a main rotor change, and while being test flown by Capt Tiedt to Luanda's airport, it went down in flames claiming four SAAF lives.

 

Please refer to:

Construction Number f.9552 from;

 

http://www.helis.com/database/?menu=7&tfabrn=22&tmodn=102&menudiv=5&menudiv=5

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-21 11:34:32
105

Trevor Donald Bodill [born 21/12/1956] attended Glenwood High School , Durban from 1969-1974 . He was killed on 16/1/1976 in the operational area in an accident while travelling in an armoured car . He was 19 years of age .

Unknown
Unknown@unknown.com
2001-05-30 13:37:59
105

Trevor Bodill belonged to the "Natal" Bodill family. All the Bodill's in South Africa are related. The first Bodill's William arrived in 1860 at Port Elizabeth. Trevor Bodill is decendants are from the Families who lived in Grahamstown and Fort Beaufort

Unknown
Unknown@unknown.com
2001-11-27 09:34:20
105

Extract from Glenwood's "Roll of Honour"
Trevor Donald Bodill
Rank: TROOPER
Unit: S.S.B.
Where Wounded/Killed/Died: Operation Savannah, Southern Angola
Where Buried/Commemorated: To be confirmed
Cause of Death: Armoured car accident
Date of Death: 16/01/1976
Age: 19
Dates at Glenwood: 1969-74

Donna
donna4clarke@live.co.uk
2011-03-03 03:29:50
108Maj Mike Bondesio died of a heart attack at the controls of an Avro Shackleton Johan Meyer
johanm@tsamail.co.za
2008-10-24 13:53:29
108Just a correction on your information.  It is not 33 Squadron but 35 Squadron.
John
jonfran@telkomsa.net
2012-06-12 06:45:28
108Mike Bondesio (who died of a heart attack at the controls of a SAAF Shack in 1983). He managed to limp his crippled MkIII of 203 Squadron into Lisbon on 2 Griffons and one Viper - having to do some fast footwork to avoid the brand new Salazar Bridge. For his extreme professionalism he was awarded the AFC. 
james
james-smi@iafrica.com
2012-06-19 09:12:52
114

In the early hours of Thursday 18 February 1982, SAS President Kruger, oldest of the three Type 12 Frigates of the South African Navy, collided with the replenishment vessel, SAS Tafelberg. Both ships were severely damaged but TAFELBERG returned safely to Simon?s Town. President Kruger sank approximately two hours after the collision when efforts to keep her afloat failed.

14 men from Mess 12, Chief Petty Officers J B Booysen and W M G van Tonder; Petty Officers S A Bothma, G A Brind, R C Bulterman, G W de Villiers, E Koen, H Lotter, R A McMaster, R F Skeates, H W Smit, W R Smith, M B R Whiteley and C J Wium died in the collision and their bodies went down with the ship. A further two men, Chief Petty Officer D Webb and Able Seaman G T Benjamin, lost their lives after the collision and whilst abandoning ship. Of these last named two only CPO Webb?s body was recovered after being sighted by SAS Protea on the morning of 19 February.

See the full story in Three Frigates by Rear Admiral Chris Bennett SAN (Ret)

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2006-06-11 00:59:30
118The surname of my brother was wrong on the official records - it should read BUS, not BOS. He died on the 12th of August 1975 at the age of 23 as an able seaman, as stated. He was on the SAS Kimberley and they were busy with military manouvres on the South Coast of Mozambique. He apparently died due to drowning after suffering a head injury. He was not married and left behind his parents, 4 sisters and a younger brother - who was also in the armed forces at the time, serving in South West Africa (now Namibia).

2003-10-05 20:12:57
119

Dr. Louis Bothma, skrywer wat as lid van 32 Bataljon aan die Grensoorlog deelgeneem het, beskryf hoe die geskiedkundige herontmoeting tussen sappeur Johan van der Mescht en sy Swapo-ontvoerders by die watergat by Elundu aan die grens tussen Namibia en Angola gebeur het.

Woensdag 2 Desember 2009. Oos-Ovamboland. Terug by die berugte watergat  knap duskant die ou Suid-Afrikaanse Weermag (SAW) se Elundu-basis. Hier waar sappeur Johan van der Mescht kort voor dagbreek op Sondag 19 Februarie 1978 deur Swapo gevang en oor die grens na Angola geneem is. Skokgolwe het deur die SAW getrek. Johan, wat byna vier en 'n half jaar van sy lewe in die gevreesde Sao Paulo-tronk in Luanda geslyt het, is allesbehalwe 'n held. Vra maar die mense, dan hoor jy: "Hy het geslaap toe hy die watergat moes oppas; hy het na Swapo toe oorgeloop; hy is 'n verraaier; 'n slegte troep..."

'n Mistroostige suidewindjie rol by die watergat wit stowwe die bosse in toe die betrokkenes in die drama uit die bakkies klim. Aan die een kant Johan, sy vrou, Cheryl, en hul twee dogters, Chantal en Nadia. Teenoor hulle, mnre. Danger Ashipla en Kamati ka Elio, die manne wat Johan gevang het. Daardie jare "terroriste"; vandag Swapo-guerrillas. 'n Kortkop agter hulle volg Danger se seun Stephen, ons tolk wat vlot Afrikaans praat. Een van Danger se 18 kinders. "Dit is nie meer dieselfde nie," se Johan agter sy donkerbril, toe sy blou oe na 31 jaar, 9 maande en 13 dae, weer oor Elundu se watergat gly. Maar Johan, nou 55 jaar oud, is ook nie meer dieselfde nie. Cheryl en die dogters maal senuweeagtig in die ronde. Weet nie mooi waar om te kyk nie. Is hierdie dan nou die plek waar alles begin het? 'n Lang diep gat langs 'n stowwerige paadjie iewers tussen nerens in die bosse...

'n Rukkie later is die geselskappie aan die suidekant van die watergat bymekaar. Min of meer op die plek waar die tent gestaan het. Danger-hulle het van die westekant af op die handjievol Suid-Afrikaanse soldate afgesluip. Die oggend 04:00, pas nadat die maan ondergegaan het. "Ons kon hulle hoor snork," vertel Danger. Hy het met 'n stok teen die kolf van sy AK47 getik, die teken dat sy manne gereed moes maak vir die aanval. Toe het hy 'n handgranaat na die tent geslinger. Dit was chaos. Kamati ka Elio onthou nog hoe Danger geskreeu het: "Forward! Forward! Capture! Capture!"

"Johanna van der Mescht" (soos Kamati Johan uit onkunde noem) het tussen die tent en die watergat gele. Gewond. "Toe tel ek hom oor my skouer en sleep hom weg. Hy was nie so groot soos nou nie. Hy was maer," vertel Kamati.  'n kort, ronde kereltjie; self vandag twee maal groter as toe. "Ons het nog een gevang. 'n Groot Boer. Maar hy wou nie loop nie. Toe maak ons hom dood," vertel Danger en vat aan sy donkerbril met die groot ronde lense waarin die watergat weerkaats. Dis nuus vir my. Daar was drie dooies - Ferreira, Hunter en Bosch. Watter een van die drie was dit? Skielik is daar 'n stokou man met 'n verslete oorpakbaadjie op die toneel. Hy val Danger om die nek. Ons staan oorbluf. "Wie is hy? Waar kom hy so skielik vandaan...?" "Dit is Hosea Martin. Ons noem hom Shimbungu, wat 'wolf' beteken. Hy kom doer van sy kraal af." Danger beduie westekant toe. "Die Boere het op 'n dag sommer net 'n gat hier voor my kraal kom grawe, asof dit hul plek was," vertel Shimbungu. Ons hoor die plek se naam is eintlik Ehono. Johan en Cheryl staan hand om die lyf. Die dogters haak by hulle in. Die Van der Meschts is 'n hegte gesin. Cheryl kan die trane nie teehou nie. Johan fluister iets in haar oor. Danger vertel hoe hulle haastig 'n draagbaar vir Johan geprakseer het. Toe is hulle suid, wes, en uiteindelik noord na die kaplyn (grens) toe met hom. 'n Ander groep onder bevel van 'n Haufiku was ongedissiplineerd. Hulle is reguit op hul spore terug en het in 32 Bataljon vasgeloop. Haufiku het met sy lewe geboet.

'n Ander groep wat tegelykertyd die Elundu-basis moes aanval, het nooit in posisie gekom nie. Dinge het skeefgeloop. Maar die operasie het in sy hoofdoel geslaag: Om 'n wit Boer lewend te vang. Nogal in sy tent, nie in Angola nie, maar in Suidwes-Afrika self! "Waar gaan ons nou?" het Johan aan Kamati gevra toe hulle oor die kaplyn gaan. "Oshakati toe." Johan het geld gevra. "Ek wil my vrou bel." Maar Kamati het nie verstaan nie. Eers later by sy makkers gehoor "bel" beteken "phone". Anderkant die kaplyn is Johan saam met Danger agterop 'n voertuig gelaai en na die People's Liberation Army of Namibia (Plan) se gebiedshoofkwartier by Ohaipeto geneem. Almal was in ekstase. Danger Ashipala was 'n held. Toe Cassinga toe. Die eindbestemming was Luanda, waar Johan saam met die berugte 'kolonel' Callan se huursoldate opgesluit is.

Johan se beurt om te vertel: "Ek was maar net 'n doodgewone ou wat die water moes skoonmaak. Geen rang gehad nie. Die infanterie moes die watergat oppas. Ek het hulle nie eens geken nie. 'Elke week was hier 'n ander seksie. Moet my nie vra wie die bevelvoerder daardie nag was nie. Ek weet nie. Dit was my laaste Grenskamp. Ek en Cheryl was pasgetroud; Chantal maar sewe maande oud..."

Later stap Johan en Danger alleen water toe. Ons kan nie mooi hoor wat hulle praat nie. Maar toe hulle omdraai, skud hulle blad en se Danger vir Johan: "We are friends now."

Soos Kitchener aan die einde van die oorlog vir die Boere gese het. Ovamboland se son het geen genade nie. Ons klim terug in die bakkies. Nie grappies om terug op die Grens te wees nie. Die jare het aangestap. Tyd wag nie vir die helde nie. Danger is al 'n man van 65. "Het jy ooit in die bos gebid?" waag ek dit. "Ja, ja. Ons is Christene net soos julle. Ek het baie gebid," se die man wat voor die oorlog 'n bokser was en nou 'n polisie-kommissaris in Windhoek. Hy vertel hoe hy die hele oorlog deur geveg het, maar nooit gevang is nie. Daar was lospryse op sy kop. Vroue, selfs 'n familielid, is gestuur om hom te verraai. Koevoet het gereeld foto's van dooie "terroriste" aan sy ma gewys: "Hier is Danger. Ons het hom doodgeskiet." By die polisiekantoor op Eenhana word ons gul deur kommissaris A.K. Shivute en sy dienaars ontvang. Maar ons moet lastige vrae beantwoord. "Hoekom het die Boere in Namibie kom veg?" Johan moet praat. Danger kry hom aan die arm beet: "Haal af jou goggles en jou keppie en praat met die mense." Johan draai na my toe. "Wat moet ek se?" "Se vir hulle wat in jou hart is. Not dit." "I am here because of the reconciliation between me and Danger. I believe your country is doing very well. It was not a nice war. I was no chief. The big chiefs stayed behind..." Toe trek die groepie polisiemanne los met 'n strydlied. Johan stap bakkie toe. Tyd vir 'n koue bier. Hy is nie die held nie. Danger Ashipala is. Maar Danger kan dit nie wees sonder Johan nie.

- Beeld
T Jenkins
lenianti@yahoo.com
2009-12-15 13:16:14
119An interesting story but some add ones. The person that was shot and left for dead was a big guy by the name of Cloete (he had head trauma and was shot in the stomach. He survived though. I do not believe that SWAPO had any intention of taking a prisoner. That was just pure luck for them and they turned it into positive propaganda for them. The reason I say this is that SWAPO set up a 70 plus man L-shaped classical ambush. The ambush kicked off as Hunter & Bosch were getting ready to wake the next set of guards. Grenades were thrown at the tent (luckily old m7 South African grenades, which were useless). Strategically placed LMG and normal assault weapons were usd. The firepower lasted for approx 15/20 min. and the SADF guys had run out of ammunition. Only then did the SWAPO forces have the guts to advance and kill the remaining people. Luckily in the bigger picture their ambush was a failure (apart from van Der Mescht - prisoner, and 3 dead, which is a tragedy and my condolences go out to their families). I say a failure because - On an open killing field well lit by mortar lighting from Elundu who were supplying mortar fire and light to assist the SADF (it actually had the opposite effect but was the right thing to do). SWAPO only killed 3 out of 11 soldiers. An ironic/sad add on - Ferreira, Bosch and Hunter were best friends. May they RIPKraut
kraut58@gmail.com
2017-06-26 13:55:19
122Rfn Boshoff drowned while crossing the Kunene River between Namibia and Angola on the 20th or 21st June 1984. He, Rfn. L. Wasas and myself went across on a log to Angola and had to swim back to Namibia as the log had disappeared downstream. They both drowned and were found 26KMs downstream 6 days later. In my opinion Rfn. Boshoff was exhausted and appeared to have been sucked under by a whirlpool effect and Rfn. Wasas went through an area of rapids and was possibly knocked unconcious. I was their section leader Cpl. T.W.White.Cpl. T.W.White
trevorw@live.co.za
2010-08-18 15:17:09
123'Bossie' was a member of my Squadron (A Squadron - 1973 : 1SSB Bloem). In October 1973, we had come back from the border and were spending our last days as 'ou manne', before 'klaring out', at De Brug, on random manouveres with Citizen Forces members on course. It was weekend and the PF's at the time left De Brug for Bloem for the weekend - we stayed at De Brug for a 'slow' weekend and to look after the verhicles. When night fell, Bossie, Flip, Ernst, and one more guy - I don't remember his name -, took a 60 (Armoured Car) to go and hunt for rabbits - 'hase jag' on the open plains of  De Brug. It was not long before some guys from another unit arrived in a 'garry' with the news that there was an accident - Bossie had fallen off the armoured car on full speed, and landed under the wheels. He was killed. For men who had done border duty in the Caprivi and Southern Angola / Zambia, and had gone through a tough year in die armoured corps, it was a devastating blow. For the driver, Flip, and Ernst, who were also my school friends in Zeerust for five years, this was an incident that we would never forget as long as we lived. Bossie was burried in Welkom in full military hounors and we marched proudly that day - not for the miserable accident that claimed his life, but for what he stood for and what he contributed during 1973 at 1SSB. I will always remember Bossie as one of the most jovial and outgoing positive souls, I had the honour to serve with and be friends with.
I heard from friends many years later that Flip died in a car crash - I could never get that confirmed though. The men I served with at 1SSB A Squadron in Bloem during 1973 (our corporals then were Mike Muller, Killer Steinberg and the like) were tough and good guys, going on to serve their country with pride and honour in their Citizen Force units.
Frans Ellis
frankmar@vodamail.co.za
2011-06-15 11:20:04
124

Rfn G.M. Boshoff - Witbank Commando was killed in a follow up operation (after an attack on farmers in the Transvaal/Rhodesian border town of Alldays.



2004-02-22 21:43:40
124

Rfn George Boshoff was a member of the Witbank Commando and was doing his first three month camp after completing his two year national service.

On 10 November 1983 he was part of a SADF / SAP pursuit tracking four heavily armed insurgents who had crossed the border from Zimbabwe into Northern Transvaal. The insurgents had attacked a local farmer and his elderly grandmother in their vehicle the evening before, and both were fortunate to escape with their lives. The SADF cornered the four insurgents on a farm some 20 kilometres outside of Alldays, and in the ensuing fire fight all four insurgents were killed, but unfortunately so was George Boshoff.

His death was doubly tragic for his family as he was only 18 days away from completing his camp. Also, his older brother had been killed in a vehicle accident some three years previously.

(Information extracted from news report in the Cape Times - dated 11 November 1983)
Peter
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2008-06-23 07:46:47
125Ek is jammer , ek kon niks meer daai oggend doen.
RIP
Willem LS Duiker
nvt
2011-11-18 23:46:29
126

Bosse lost his life while on guard duty with Gnr Bezuidenhout on a farm near Tsumeb, well below the danger line. A small band of terrorists sneaked up on the two and shot them at point blank range. They were both members of 1 Medium Battery, 4th Field Artillery Regiment. Both had Western Transvaal colours in Cricket and Rugby. They grew up together as best friends, and had no family (having been brought up together in a childcare facility)

Unknown
Unknown
2001-05-30 13:37:59
131

This is probably "Botha, D" as listed on the Klapperkop monument.

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-20 14:42:52
137

Name : Piere Botha 
Military Number: 81196776 PE 
 Date of death: 6 Sep 1985
Age: 20
Unit: Technical Services Corps

Piere Botha died in a shooting incident at 61 Base Workshops, accident in Weapon Workshop - bullet ricochet off Workbench, killing Piere.
(Information from "South Africa War Graves Project)

Chris Bester
chrisbester37@yahoo.com
2010-12-13 09:44:17
140

In the early hours of Thursday 18 February 1982, SAS President Kruger, oldest of the three Type 12 Frigates of the South African Navy, collided with the replenishment vessel, SAS Tafelberg. Both ships were severely damaged but TAFELBERG returned safely to Simon?s Town. President Kruger sank approximately two hours after the collision when efforts to keep her afloat failed.

14 men from Mess 12, Chief Petty Officers J B Booysen and W M G van Tonder; Petty Officers S A Bothma, G A Brind, R C Bulterman, G W de Villiers, E Koen, H Lotter, R A McMaster, R F Skeates, H W Smit, W R Smith, M B R Whiteley and C J Wium died in the collision and their bodies went down with the ship. A further two men, Chief Petty Officer D Webb and Able Seaman G T Benjamin, lost their lives after the collision and whilst abandoning ship. Of these last named two only CPO Webb?s body was recovered after being sighted by SAS Protea on the morning of 19 February.

See the full story in Three Frigates by Rear Admiral Chris Bennett SAN (Ret)

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2006-06-11 01:02:02
141I was serving with the parachute regiment in Ondangwa during 1976. Corporal Boucher was with 95 Tactical Air Unit - SAAF. His unit was guarding the Ondangwa Base. I believe there was a fire in one of the tents at the Air Force camp area. Willy (I think that was his name) rushed to assist. He was killed by an exploding fire extinguisher...I was told. It was sudden..it was brief. All I know is, that Corporal Boucher was a brave man..a very brave man indeed!

2002-01-27 17:32:54
145

On 2 January 1976 2Lt Brandon was in command of a Platoon of men approaching Cela from the North, during the South African withdrawal from Angola. He was advised that Cuban troops occupied the hillocks, or dimples as they were known, ahead of them so he led his patrol on foot towards these, camping overnight in rainy weather once they had reached the latter. Early the following morning Brandon led a section on a reconnaissance, leaving Corporal Vincent Rawlings and the remainder of the Platoon in the bivouac they had established. After leading his section up a footpath to the crest of the hill, 2Lt Brandon climbed onto a large flat rock but was immediately shot and killed by enemy machine gun fire, which broke out. They had walked into an ambush. At great personal risk, Corporal Rawlings moved forward and retrieved 2Lt Brandon's body under enemy fire, an act that earned him the Honoris Crux in Silver.

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2008-01-25 05:23:47
145Ek het Daryl goed geken. Ons het hom Brandy genoem. Ons kompanie het bestaan uit 3 peletons en ek , Herman vd Westhuizen (Wessie), en Etienne van Tonder was die ander 2 peletonbevelvoerders.Ons bevelvoerder was maj Charlie Hochapfel en 2e in bevel was kapt Junior Botha. Brandy het 'n wonderlike geaardheid gehad en het met sy motorfiets huistoe gery vanaf 5SAI in Ladysmith as ons afgehad het. Ons 3 peletonbevelvoerders was avontuurlik, maar Brandy se dood het ons hard aarde toe gebring. As ons 3 gekuier het, het hy altyd voorspel dat hy die een sal wees wat in 'n geveg sal sterf. Herman vd Westhuizen
herman.vanderwesthuizen@pgwc.gov.za
2012-02-11 12:28:08
145Whilst we were based at Cela, I was allowed to use one of the deserted farmhouses as "kitchen". The coffee was "instant" but as the weather was not the greatest, Daryl spent many hours there chatting about "klaaring out", civvy life and the fact that everything was ready for him to go and study at the PmB campus of Natal University. When the new 2nd Lts arrived to take over, he and the other officers expected to leave asap. I cannot remember if there were logistical challenges but on the very day day that he was supposed to leave for home, they were sent out on one more important assignment. He was not happy but, typically of men in uniform, he obeyed the instruction. I remember him telling me to keep the coffee going for his return but ......Jan Wepener (the skinny chef)
thewepeners@gmail.com
2015-07-27 04:44:37
147

22 Sep 1989: Two members from 85 Combat Flying School were killed when their Atlas MB326M Impala Mk I, Serial No. 582 crashed near Sabie during a routine training flight. The casualties were:

  • 86641594PS Lieutenant W Bredenkamp. He was 20
  • 85331866PS Lieutenant Deon Joubert. He was 20.
Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-22 12:51:46
149

An ex-colleague of mine told me a few years ago that he was on that train. I called him earlier today and without referring to the accident, asked him where he was on 25 March 1977. Het asked me "what time" and I said "about 02h00". He said "sitting upright in my train bunk at Keetmanshoop station." He is very creative with the pen and he and an excellent memory, being an ex history teacher. I asked him to send me a few notes. Unfortunately it's in Afrikaans and here it is:-

"

Keetmanshoop - 25 Maart 1977

Iets maak my wakker en ek trek my regop aan die *rand* van die boonste slaapbank in ons 6-man kompartement in die 4de wa van ons troeptrein wat na die grens op pad is * ons is almal van Regiment Westelike Provincie. Dis 02:10.

Die volgende oomblik is daar *n slag en ons word almal geskud. Die ander 5 ouens val almal uit die slaapbanke en sommige word beseer toe hulle op die oopgeslaande tafel val. Almal hardloop uit na die perron en daar*s chaos. Willem (?) sit en huil op die perron.

Ons hoor toe *n trein met 2 *units* en 25 oop trokke met tonne ystererts het in ons trein wat voor die stasie staan, teen *n effense helling afgekom en in ons vasgery. Die *units* is ontspoor en die 1ste wa ook, maar die 2de een het dwarsgedraai en die ander trein se een *unit* het regdeur *n kompartement gery. Vyf van ons manne is dood, terwyl die 6de een in daardie noodlottige kompartement sonder *n skrapie deur die venster geval het. Gary Bricknel * wat vir die WP krieket speel * is een van die oorledenes.

Daar word vir volunteers gevra om die beseerdes te help en altesaam 90 manne word later na milit?re hospitale afgevoer. Twee RP*s met ammunisie word voor die telefoonhokkies op die perron staangemaak en beveel om enigeen wat 2 meter van die hokkies kom, te wond. Almal wil net teruggaan * land toe * maar kmdt Ivan Bester van die Paarl * ons bevelvoerder * s? later di? oggend dat ons voortgaan en gaan veg, en om 14:00 vertrek ons trein weer noorde toe. Heelwat van die waens is beskadig, maar hulle is intussen vervang.

Willem herinner my later hoekom hy gehuil het en ek word koud. Ons was op Kaapstad in wa 1, maar *n halfuur voor ons sou vertrek, het een of ander offisier ges? ons 6 moes na wa 2 gaan, na die kompartement waar die 5 man gesterf het. Tien minute voor ons vertrek is ons weer aanges? om na wa 4 te gaan.

Dit was nog nie ons tyd nie!"

Hein Odendal
heinodendal@yahoo.com
2008-07-23 15:52:57
149

Info from http://cricketarchive.com/Archive/Players/13/13046/13046.html and http://content-www.cricinfo.com/southafrica/content/player/44238.html :-

Full nameGary Arthur Bricknell
Born13th August 1954, Cape Town, Cape Province, South Africa
Died25th March 1977, Keetmanshoop, SWA/Namibia (aged 22 years 224 days)
BattingRight-hand batsman
BowlingSlow left-arm orthodox
TeamsWestern Province B (Main FC: 1975/76-1976/77); Western Province (Main FC: 1975/76-1976/77)

Gary Bricknell, the young Western Province left-arm spinner, was killed in a train crash at Keetmanshoop, South-West Africa, on March 25. Only 22, he had taken 58 first-class wickets at 21.38 in his brief career.

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2008-07-23 16:01:54
152

Danny Holder
dannyholder@bigpond.com
2010-07-30 14:54:13
153

In the early hours of Thursday 18 February 1982, SAS President Kruger, oldest of the three Type 12 Frigates of the South African Navy, collided with the replenishment vessel, SAS Tafelberg. Both ships were severely damaged but TAFELBERG returned safely to Simon?s Town. President Kruger sank approximately two hours after the collision when efforts to keep her afloat failed.

14 men from Mess 12, Chief Petty Officers J B Booysen and W M G van Tonder; Petty Officers S A Bothma, G A Brind, R C Bulterman, G W de Villiers, E Koen, H Lotter, R A McMaster, R F Skeates, H W Smit, W R Smith, M B R Whiteley and C J Wium died in the collision and their bodies went down with the ship. A further two men, Chief Petty Officer D Webb and Able Seaman G T Benjamin, lost their lives after the collision and whilst abandoning ship. Of these last named two only CPO Webb?s body was recovered after being sighted by SAS Protea on the morning of 19 February.

See the full story in Three Frigates by Rear Admiral Chris Bennett SAN (Ret)

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2006-06-11 01:07:20
154

Military vehicle accident - Armour car rolled and fell on member

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-21 20:51:02
157

Capt Anthonie (Tonie) Johannes Brits 61286936E

Born 07 Sep 1944 - Springs, Transvaal (Gauteng).

Matriculated in 1972 at Hoër Seunskool Hugenote, Springs.

Joined the Army on 03 Jan 1967 and studied B.Mil (B.Com) at the Military Academy, Saldanha and was Sportsman of the year in 1968 - played rugby, cricket and tennis - and completed his studies in 1968. He was stationed at "81 Voorraad Depot" (don't know what the English for that would be) when he applied for a transfer to the Air force to be trained as a pilot during 1971 and despite being 27 years old, this was approve and he started his pilot training at Central Flying School April 1972. He died in a airplane crash on 13 June 1973 whilst doing weapons training in Bloemfontein. He was due to receive his wings during the span of 1973.

Conrad Brits
jcbrits@mweb.co.za
2009-09-28 21:25:48
158Colin was on the same pupil pilots course as me. He was a mischevious fellow. He was due to leave the SAAF at the end of the year and would probably have become an airline pilot. He was killed while giving flying instruction, in a Kudu, to a newly qualified pilot in Potchefstroom.

2003-10-28 05:32:32
160On 15 February 1979 Mirage F1.AZ 246 flown by Capt. Wassie Wasserman had an engine flame out near Cullinan in South Africa, pilot ejected safely. Maj Britz (in Mir F1.AZ 200) did a slow fly-past to survey scene and crashed as well. He ejected, but the seat failed to deploy in time.Johan Meyer
johan@luxliner.co.za
2006-06-30 13:12:34
160

Maj Frederik Wilhelm Christiaan (Chris) Brits 65851354E

Born 08 April 1946. Matriculated 1973 at Hoër Seunskool Hugenote, Springs.

Joined the Air force as pupil pilot on 14 Mar 1966. During his career he was attached to various units, was flying instructor and was a member of the Silver Falcons. It was his desire to be a fighter pilot and this brought him to Waterkloof Airforce Base as Mirage F1 pilot.

He died on 15 Feb 1979 in a air crash outside Cullinan.

Conrad Brits
jcbrits@mweb.co.za
2009-09-28 21:30:57
162

2 Lt Roelie Britz from 32 Bn Gp was killed by a crocodile on the night of 14 November 1978 when he went for a swim in the Kavango River. His body was never recovered.

Information from Louis Bothma's book, Die Buffel Struikel.
Dion Rossouw
grossouw@wdsl.co.za
2007-01-24 20:26:54
162Roelie was killed in 1977 and not 1978....I was at Buffalo when it happened....was my 1st border camp. He was one of the teachers at the school in Kimbo.Paul Gouws
paulgouws@live.com
2016-12-11 10:31:00
163

Schackleton 1718 crashed in the Stetteynskloof mountains near Rawsonville in the Western Cape after encountering bad weather on a training exercise, with the loss of all 13 crew members. The aircraft was on it's way to join a Royal Navy ship taking part in "Capex" off Port Elizabeth.

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-21 21:11:22
166

'I saw too much suffering'

Oct 29 2008 03:34:32:270PM - (SA)

Breggie Hoffman (Piorek), Johannesburg

I was an assistant nurse at the Windhoek State Hospital in 1976 when a soldier was brought in with burns from a landmine that exploded when they drove over it in the road.

The soldier was young - 18 or 19 years old - his name was Anton Broodryk from Koppies, Free State. After two weeks he was transferred to Voortrekkerhoogte Hospital in Pretoria, but he sadly passed away a couple of days later.

Till this day I can't forget that soldier's face or his name.

(extracted from: Die Beeld)

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2008-11-13 11:01:24
166Anton Leon Broodryk was born on 8 March 1956 and passed away on 13 April 1976 he grave is in Heilbron Free State, a few meters away from his Paternal Grandparents' graves.
His Father Willie and his Mother Marjorie farmed in Koppies/Heilbron area.
Irma Eugenie Broodryk
eugenie.broodryk@gamil.com
2011-02-01 18:56:56
166Was terug geruk toe ek die deel lees in Beeld van die verpleegster. Was saam in Infanterieskool en Parabats. Altyd saam gery op pas vanaf Oudtshoorn na Jhb en hom op die pad afgelaai in die Vrystaat.

Onthou jou nog ou maat.
Johan Nel
johan.nel@trident.co.za
2011-06-23 11:32:07
167

RFN M.A.BROWN , OF THE KAFFRARIAN RIFLES DIED ON SERVICE DURING TRAINING AT OUDTSHOORN IN 1965 .THIS WAS DUE TO THE EXCESSIVE HEAT OF OVER 37 C,HE DIED OF HEAT EXHAUSTION IN THE EARLY HOURS OF THE MORNING IN DECEMBER OF 1965.TRAINING PROCEDURES WERE LATER MODIFIED DUE TO THE FINDINGS OF THIS DEATH

.



2001-05-30 00:00:00
170

14 Julie 1983 sal nooit uit my gedagtes gaan nie. Die dag toe jou lewe weg geruk was. Naby Baken 53.

Marius Wentzel
wenmar@live.co.za
2009-12-02 15:46:07
170hy was in 8SAI vir opleiding 82-83mww
wenmar@live.co.za
2010-09-04 21:09:50
170

I was in the same platoon as cpl Bruwer and remember the claymore mine accident clearly. Rfn Groenewald was critically injured in the same incident. We were on the Angolan border and had set up claymore mines. Someone decided platoons had to change positions. Terrible descision. Just before the chopper landed another mine was accidentally detonated. We lost a brave soldier that day and two others were seriously injured. We heard the explosion and were only a few hundred meters away.
Rest in peace cpl!!

wayne
wforrester@absamail.co.za
2012-08-01 04:02:08
171

In the early hours of Thursday 18 February 1982, SAS President Kruger, oldest of the three Type 12 Frigates of the South African Navy, collided with the replenishment vessel, SAS Tafelberg. Both ships were severely damaged but TAFELBERG returned safely to Simon?s Town. President Kruger sank approximately two hours after the collision when efforts to keep her afloat failed.

14 men from Mess 12, Chief Petty Officers J B Booysen and W M G van Tonder; Petty Officers S A Bothma, G A Brind, R C Bulterman, G W de Villiers, E Koen, H Lotter, R A McMaster, R F Skeates, H W Smit, W R Smith, M B R Whiteley and C J Wium died in the collision and their bodies went down with the ship. A further two men, Chief Petty Officer D Webb and Able Seaman G T Benjamin, lost their lives after the collision and whilst abandoning ship. Of these last named two only CPO Webb?s body was recovered after being sighted by SAS Protea on the morning of 19 February.

See the full story in Three Frigates by Rear Admiral Chris Bennett SAN (Ret)

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2006-06-11 01:07:47
174

Dawie Burger was my friend when we were at school in Worcester, Cape, South Africa. He was a helicopter pilot who trained at Valhalla and Swartkops Military bases. It is more than a quarter of a century since he died and I am not at all sure of the details, except that he met his end while flying. I vaguely remember that he died somewhere around the border of Mozambique and Swaziland and SA, but I may be wrong.

I mention what I know so that future researchers can start searching with a little bit of help.

Francois Greeff, London, 2003. goodgreeff@hiddencode.co.uk

Francois Greeff
goodgreeff@hiddencode.co.uk
2003-07-29 11:40:01
174 I am Tamryn Burger my Dad Louis Burger nicknamed Vaaitjiie is Dawie's brother. Dawie birthday was 3rd October 1956, he dies when he was 21 and he was not flying the helicopter as some people like to believe, they flew into a small hill under bad weather conditions, near Ermelo. Tamryn
tamryn88@yahoo.com
2010-07-21 18:14:23
174Ek boer naby Sheepmoor , klein dorpie naby Ermelo .Weet waar die ongeluk plaasgevind het  . Berg suid - wes van Sheepmoor . Sterkte vir julle met verlies , al is dit lank terug .E-pos my vir meer besonderhede of sel no. Henry
Henry
henryg@homemail.co.za
2011-11-11 03:46:06
179

I wonder if you could help me. We are searching for details on my father in Law. He died during the Angola War - his name is on the honours list, but we do not have any details on him at all - person no 179.

All the details we have for him are: Force no - 65943037PE, Name - Joseph Johannes Burger. We do know that a got a Honouris Medal. My husband cannot remember him at all. His parents were divorced and his mother never talks about his father at all.

Please could you perhaps find out any information on him.

Your help would be greatly appreciated

Yours sincerely

Helen Burger

Helen Burger
helen.burger@ntlworld.com
2001-09-10 09:18:02
179Dad, we miss you! Anyone with any info please let us know. Jeff
jeffburger@ymail.com
2008-09-22 14:46:01
179WO2 JJ Burger was my CSM during National Service during 1975 at 2 SAI Bn Gp in Walvis Bay.
He was very involved in Ops Savannah - there is quite a bit of reference to him in books on the war at that time.
B G Kirby
slaapstad@hotmail.com
2010-08-09 21:15:36
179I want to thank everyone that helped us:
Jeff Schur
Hans Fouche
Koos Moorcroft
Rowley Medlin (9F) R.I.P
Jeff Burger
jeffburger@ymail.com
2011-12-08 13:15:25
179And Mr Kirby
Thank You.
Jeff Burger
jeffburger@ymail.com
2011-12-08 13:25:51
179Yes, I remember Sgt Major Burger from 1975 at 2 SAI. I was fresh out of infantary school posted to 2 SAI as platoon weapons instructor. SM Burger was my CSM. Can remember him as being a wonderful person to us instructors, can also remember taking his young children to the movies in Walvis. Me and another Lance Corp. whose surname I can remember- Mike ?Jimmy de Scande
jimmy.descande@gmail.com
2012-10-03 03:22:12
179Hi Helen, Are you still searching for details re the late JJ Burger? He was as JB Kirby the WO of Delta Coy(company) 2SAI BNGP 1975. The coy was dissolved after basics. There was a diaspora of guys to other units just to escape Walvis Bay, we???d do anything to get away! Other companies where under strength and Delta was thus disbanded for their sake. He was then transferred to the HQ Coy for the remainder of that year (as I was). That year was the beginning of the serious involvement of the SADF in Angola. He accompanied the battalion to Ruacana where we were based for the remainder of that year. We occupied the construction area of the dam wall. Our D Squadron(armoured cars) went up to Caluquec(?) daily to escort refugees out of Angola. Later the same year during Operation Savannah a shall section moved into Angola. I don???t recall him been part of that force, I think he was remained at the base camp at Ruacana Customs Post. I was a national service man and my time was then up. I did hear a couple of years later that he died in a motor vehicle accident somewhere between Voortrekker Hoogte and Pretoria on the Ben Schoeman Highway. I remember the year as 1978. He was then married, I do not remember her name, she was a very attractive, blonde, and the Walvis Bay Ahoy Festival Queen. I played in the marching band as lead drummer and we marched/played in the festival. The only contact that I had with her was on a weekend me and a couple of other guys assisted them to move house (we were volunteered). She was friendly and rewarded us with a cold drink. I don???t recall seeing any children at that stage, there may have been. As a Sergeant Major he was a fairman and closer to the troops than most. I hope this helps in some way. Donald Kirsten
laughter.unique@gmail.com
2015-07-08 22:18:07
183

SAAF Member - Kamieskroon - Military vehicle accident

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-21 21:45:30
185

Rfn Buys served in A Coy (Pl 1 Sec 3) of 11 Commando (Kimberley) and was killed on 12 Dec 1977 when the buffel he was travelling in detonated a "cheese mine".

Rfn Buys as well as Cpl Mark Wilcox were killed as a result of injuries sustained in this blast.

Unknown

2003-01-25 07:37:23
185

MY NAME IS CHRIS J LOTTER. I WAS THE OPS MEDIC WHEN THIS ACCIDENT OCCURED. DOC RICK MORRISON AND MYSELF TRIED TO SAVE BUYS AND WILLCOX. BUYS DIED OF SEVERE HEAD INJURIES AND WILLCOX FROM CHEST INJURIES...THE ROLLBAR ON THE BUFFALO CAUSED THE INJURIES. 7 OTHER GUYS WERE ALSO INJURED.BOTH WILLCOX AND BUYS WERE CASAVAC'ED TO ONDANGWA BUT BOTH DIED FROM THEIR INJURIES.

CHRIS LOTTER
chris@beltaservices.co.za
2011-08-22 15:15:32
186

Paul was killed on the Oshikango border post by a booby trap/land mine(s). This was just before the usual 40 days to complete our 2 years national service. Paul was one person who just got on with everyone. He was in my bungalow for some time. Paul was a replacement driver as the regular driver for this Eland had gone down to Grootfontein to write an exam. I was a gunner in the 32Charlie car on the same operation and we dislodged a landmine by riding over the edge as we crossed over into Angola. We found this out later...Tough day!!

Brian Worthington
bworthington@bcgs.wa.edu.au
2009-04-22 10:48:45
188

I was both shock and saddened to come across this story of Andrew Byrd:

"He was based at the Mpacha Sickbay, Sector 70, and the circumstances around his death, was covered up somewhat, he had been trained as a normal ward medic at Klipdrift the SAMS Basic training centre in Jan-Jun 1986, before being shipped to Mpacha, on completion of Basic and 2nd phase training, he was a young eager to please guy, who volunteered to go out with an mobile infantry patrol along the cutline (the bulldozed open area that formed the country?s border) between Zambia, and what was then South West Africa. The plan was that he would do the patrol with the infantry who on completion of their patrol would hand him over to continue on another 3-day patrol with an armoured car patrol before they returned to base. The infantry patrol returned as planned, and 3 days later when the armoured car patrol returned the Lieut. Patrol Officer came to the sickbay to register a complaint that he?d had to do his patrol without a medic. It was only then that it was discovered we had a medic lost in the bush for 3 days. The Lieutenant who had commanded the Infantry patrol was called and he showed that he?d dropped Pte Byrd off at a waterhole on the cutline by one of the firebreaks, instead of where the main Mpacha road intercepted the firebreak. A patrol was sent out to collect Andrew, who was found dead by the water hole, with 2 bullet wounds. The San tracker reported that he?d formed a simple boma around himself, but there were Hyena paw prints in the immediate vicinity. It was thought that Andrew who had not completed any formal bush or Ops medic training, had remained where left for 3 days waiting to be collected and had been too scared to move away from where he was left, and at night he?d be scared by the animals like the Hyenas sniffing around, and too scared to light a fire to scare them away as that could attract possible enemy insurgents His rifle was found loaded, on fully automatic, and the safety off in his hands with 2 rounds fired., the position of the body and rifle was that he?d been sat with his back to a tree, and it appeared that he?d fallen asleep exhausted with his finger on the trigger and while asleep he'd slipped to one side and caught his finger on the trigger and had fired 2 rounds into his chest (1 round lodged into his chest the other went straight through). The position of the entry wounds we?re not in keeping with suicide, and the fact that his rifle and medical supplies etc had not been taken indicated that it was not enemy action.

The result of this situation was that both patrol Lieutenants were reprimanded and told to brush up on their patrol procedures ? one for leaving Andrew in the wrong place and not waiting for the pick up, and the other for alerting HQ that the medic had not been collected at the pick up point. Nothing was raised in regards to sending an untrained person on patrol."

May he rest in peace.

Johan Meyer
johanm@tsamail.co.za
2009-03-31 10:46:45
191

This is probably "Cahasa, A" as listed on the Klapperkop monument

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-20 14:44:33
195 02 Sep 1984: 76586106BT Able Seaman Crispin John Canner from SAS Unity died from a gunshot wound when he was accidentally shot by a fellow soldier while standing guard duty at the Slangkop Radio Station. He was 24. Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-04 05:26:58
198

Middag

sal nooit vergeet toe ek en Carstens met ons matrasse moes strand toe gaan op sondag r&r. terwyl almal swem moes ek en hy slaap op ons matrasse omdat ons aan die slaap geval het met n sessie in n klaskamer.dit was nou met opleiding by 1Recce op Bluff in 1987. het gehoor dat hy in kontak gesneuwel het maar nou eers gelees basies waar.ons glo en vertrou hy in Hemel en geniet homself.Al my liefde en gebede aan sy naasbestaandes.

 

Fanie
fanie@kolobemining.com
2012-03-30 08:53:34
198RIP Harry. Dink nog steeds aan jou elke dag na soveel jaar. Ek sal kom groet sodra ek eendag in die hemel kom, tot dan, als is nog cool hier onder. Christine
homebrew-namibia@live.com
2013-06-30 09:57:21
202

Explosion

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2002-11-25 08:46:09
202

21 Sep 1982: 76905249SP Rifleman Dumba Catumbele from 201 Battalion SWATF was killed in an accidental explosion in an ammunition bunker at Omega. He was 23.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-21 12:38:08
206

On 11 February 1985, a patrol from 32 Battalion's Charlie Company were in the vicinity of the Bale River, when their over-eager company commander took a short cut, against earlier advice from headquarters, and blundered straight into a well-prepared SWAPO base, manned by some 100 insurgents. In the 25 minute battle that ensued, Charlie Company suffered heavy casualties.

In all, 12 men from Charlie Company were killed in this action or died of their wounds soon afterwards, and many more were wounded. The seven fatalities in the inital contact were:

  • Lieutenant Dave Light (killed instantly by a bullet that struck him below his left eye).
  • Rifleman P. Kahete (severe schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman A. de Almeida (a gunshot that penetrated both lungs)
  • Rifleman P. Jose (multiple schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman K. Kalonga (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Rifleman J.C. Chihamba (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Lance Corporal J.A. Sachilombo (multiple schrapnel wounds, including to abdomen)

After dark, while the casualties were being moved to a temporary emergency base, another three wounded men, all suffering from massive chest wounds, died. They were

  • Riflemen J. Fernando,
  • M. Joaquim and
  • M. Chipoya.
  • During the night another badly wounded Rifleman, M.A. Kinguelke, also died. The final death was that of Rifleman M. Muema, who succumbed to his schrapnel wounds at 10:00 the next morning.

    Later, radio intercepts indicated that SWAPO lost 15 men killed and a number wounded in this contact, and a further two SWAPO insurgents were killed by Charlie Company and one captured when they approached the base on the morning of 12th February.

    Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-09 09:17:18
207Bruce Chinery died on 11 Jul 83 flying Impala Mk I No 477. He had a birdstrike at low level near AFB Waterkloof and resultant flame out. He ejected but died in process. Johan Meyer
johanm@tsamail.co.za
2008-10-24 14:07:32
207I was stationed as an ATC at AFB Waterkloof at the time and was in the control tower with about 4 others at the time, who witnessed it. 40 Sqn was stationed at FAWK flying mainly the Impala Mk I. Capt/Maj "Sticks" Stighling was one of the PF pilots at the sqn at the time. Lt Bruce Chinery advised that he wanted to perform a practiced simulated engine failure on take-off from RWY 01, which would entail converting speed into height before turning away from the runway for spacing so that one can position to land back in the opposite direction [RWY19]. He was cleared and took off, became airborne at/about the middle marker, and at about three quarters/four fifths along the runway (about abeam the then 12 Sqn hangar) he commenced his zoom climb but also started turning right [east] before he had reached the max attainable altitude. He then veered left [north] to complete the left-hand approach back onto RWY19. It would appear that he had not gained sufficient height to enable him to reach the runway, he disappeared from sight [appeared to be stalled] in the valley north of the base and crashed into the south side of the valley closest the base. There was no visible sign of an ejection from the tower; just a gut-wrenching ball of smoke & brief flames. Had he ejected, the aircraft would certainly have crashed into the houses in the suburbs in/along the valley. I believe in my heart that Bruce stayed with his aircraft to avoid hurting/killing innocent civilians in the houses. I do not recall the official Board of Inquiry [Capt Cobus Toerien : 3Sqn] finding anything about any alleged bird strike on take-off.Kobus vd Berg
itxtradersza@gmail.com
2016-07-15 11:02:19
208

On 11 February 1985, a patrol from 32 Battalion's Charlie Company were in the vicinity of the Bale River, when their over-eager company commander took a short cut, against earlier advice from headquarters, and blundered straight into a well-prepared SWAPO base, manned by some 100 insurgents. In the 25 minute battle that ensued, Charlie Company suffered heavy casualties.

In all, 12 men from Charlie Company were killed in this action or died of their wounds soon afterwards, and many more were wounded. The seven fatalities in the inital contact were:

  • Lieutenant Dave Light (killed instantly by a bullet that struck him below his left eye).
  • Rifleman P. Kahete (severe schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman A. de Almeida (a gunshot that penetrated both lungs)
  • Rifleman P. Jose (multiple schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman K. Kalonga (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Rifleman J.C. Chihamba (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Lance Corporal J.A. Sachilombo (multiple schrapnel wounds, including to abdomen)

After dark, while the casualties were being moved to a temporary emergency base, another three wounded men, all suffering from massive chest wounds, died. They were

  • Riflemen J. Fernando,
  • M. Joaquim and
  • M. Chipoya.
  • During the night another badly wounded Rifleman, M.A. Kinguelke, also died. The final death was that of Rifleman M. Muema, who succumbed to his schrapnel wounds at 10:00 the next morning.

    Later, radio intercepts indicated that SWAPO lost 15 men killed and a number wounded in this contact, and a further two SWAPO insurgents were killed by Charlie Company and one captured when they approached the base on the morning of 12th February.

    Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-09 09:14:25
213On 9 November 1987 during the SADFs attack on FAPLAs 16 Brigade, B Company of Combat Group Charlie was pinned down in front of the FAPLA positions and drawing heavy fire from assorted weapons A Ratel was surprised by a T-55 which appeared out of the bush less than 60 metres away. The Ratel gunner, Rifleman Adriaan Thom, placed some twenty armour-piercing rounds from his 20mm gun just below the tank commander cupola, some of which appeared to have penetrated, for an internal explosion destroyed the tank. The commander then ordered the infantry section to debus, soon after which the Ratel was itself knocked out by another T-55. The gunner, Rfn. Adriaan Thom from Ruyterwacht in Cape Town, and the driver Rfn. Muehlenbeck were both killed. One other member of this section, Rifleman P.G. Claasen, was killed by small-arms fire a few moments laterG. Rossouw
grossouw@wdsl.co.za
2005-12-03 17:38:28
216

Operasie Kropduif (die aanval op Eheke) op 28 Oktober 1977, sou die donkerste dag in die geskiedenis van die Suid Afrikaanse Spesiale Magte se bestaan wees.

Nadat die Suid Afrikaners aan Angola onttrek het in 1976, sou Swapo die geleentheid gebruik om operasionele basisse bykans teen die SWA grens te vestig. Hierdie basisse is vanaf twee groter streeks hoofkwartiere ondersteun. Cassinga sou die sentrale deel van Swapo se aanvalle op die SWA grens ondersteun, en Eheke die oostelike deel van Owamboland en die Kavango.

Daar is besluit om Eheke eerste aan te val. Drie kompanies van die nuwe 32 Batteljon sou te voet oor die grens, en Eheke vanaf die suide aanval. Op dieselfde tyd sou 'n groep van die Verkennings Kommando's, noord van Eheke afgeooi word, en met eerstelig die basis uit die noorde aanval.

Alles het van die begin verkeerd gegaan. Die Spesiale Magte is sowat 15 kilometer te ver noord uit die vliegtuie gelaat. Om dinge verder te kompliseer was die terrein plat en sonder bakens. Eers teen dagbreek was die verkenners in 'n situasie om sinvol te kon navigeer. Toe Drie Twee nog ook halfpad na die teiken, teen 'n verwoede Swapo mag vasloop is daar met reg gevra of die operasie nie afgelas moes word nie. Ook veterane soos Sers Maj FC van Zyl vra vrae. Die bevelvoerende offisier Brig Gleeson, in Rundu het teen die beter wete van die grond bevelvoerders besluit dat die operasie moes voortgaan.

Toe gebeur 'n volgende tragedie. Eheke het uit 'n groter kompleks bestaan as wat die foto interpretasie kenners raak gesien het. Behalwe vir die basis in die suide was daar ook 'n basis in die noord ooste. Hierdie kompleks is totaal misgekyk. Teen drie uur die middag loop die verkenners in 'n trop beeste vas. Die veld was bebos maar onder is die hout en dekking verwyder. Die bees wagtertjie wys na die loopgrawe voor hulle.

Die Operateurs vorm 'n linie met die ondersteunings groepe na agter. Aan die linkerkantste buite flank is Michiel 'Vingers' Kruger met 'n RPG, dan aan sy binnekant, Gert Eksteen met 'n LMG, dan FC van Zyl, Wentzel Marx met 'n LMG, Gary Walker met 'n RPG, Grant Clark, nog een, dan Antonie Badenhorst en dan Luit Chris Strydom. Aan hulle regterkant is nog groepe besig om vorentoe te beweeg. Dan bars alle hel los. Die seksie aan die linker flank het vasgeloop in die deel waar die basis se loopgrawe 90 grade wegswaai van die lyn van die aanval. In plaas daarvan dat hulle soos die res van die aanval die vyand frontaal aanval, loop hulle hulle vas in 'n vuur nie net van voor nie maar ook van die kant. Amper soort van verby die loopgrawe geloop!!

Hierdie toeloop van gebeure sou die lewe van ses jong mans kos. Letterlik binne sekondes. Die eerste om te val was FC van Zyl, die man wat die res van die seksie geinspireer het toe niemand meer lus was nie. Bykans op dieselfde oomblik sterf Vingers Kruger, die man heel buite op die flank. Tussen hulle twee stoor Gert Eksteen se LMG. Hy gaan sit op sy hurke om sy wapen se probleem uit te sorteer. Toe sy regterhand aan sy wapen raak, skiet 'n projektiel hom net bokant sy regter middelvinger deur sy hand. Sy wapen ook stukkend. Aan die regterkant gaan dit nie beter nie. Wentzel Marx, Gary Walker, Grant Clark, Antonie Badenhorts sneuwel almal. Luit Strydom word ook gewond. Gert Eksteen het nerens om heen te gaan nie. Hy haal sy pistool uit en veg met sy linkerhand verder. Op 'n stadium word twee van die ander groep deur 'n RPD masjien geweer vas gepen. Hulle kan hom nie raak skiet waar hy agter 'n boom le nie. Toe die gunner weer om die boom kruip skiet Gert Eksteen hom met sy pistool dood.

Met durf en determinasie veg die aanvallers teen die oormag en wen stukkie vir stukkie die stryd. Gert Eksteen is nie meer nodig nie. Sy hand bloei te veel. Hy beweeg terug, waar hy Kapt Meerholz aantref met 'n skoot deur die been. Hy help Meerholz so aba-aba terug na die mediese pos. By die mediese pos pluk hy sy middelvinger wat net aan 'n velletjie hang af en gooi dit in die Angolse stof. Sy hand word verbind. Hy gaan terug na sy gesneuwelde makkers en bring hulle een vir een terug.

Ek glo nie Gert Eksteen het die storie ooit vroeer aan enige iemand vertel, voor die Maandag aand in Januarie 2004. 'Ek het my hand by die werk in 'n ongeluk seergemaak' sou hy altyd se as iemand hom vra. Meer wou ek nie vra nie. Ek was op 'n baie persoonlike en privaat gebied. Maar ek is dankbaar. Helde almal van hulle, maar medaljes word ongelukkig nie in getalle toegeken nie, al is die dapperes ook 'n seksie van agt Recces. Hulle kon maar vir almal van hulle gegee het. Daardie dag is net 3 Honoris Crux toegeken. Corrie Meerholz sou een kry.

Leon
leonbez@lantic.net
2007-02-12 21:05:24
220Donald Graham Clench [ born 27/9/1962 ] attended Glenwood High School , Durban from 1976-80.He was a fireman in the SAAF , based in Pretoria . In the early morning of 21/5/1985 the SAAF firemen were called to assist the Pretoria fire brigade in extinguishing a fire that had started in a nearby petrol depot . When the tank exploded , 3 national servicemen , including Donald Clench , were burned to death .

2001-05-30 13:37:59
220All three firefighters served in the SWA/Border war, Amn Knoetze, L Cpl Clench, Sgt WJ Hawkins. Ren? Ludick
ablebrokers@telkomsa.net
2007-05-08 12:56:25
225I (Rfn G S Pretorius, 843243BG) was at this stage the ops clerk in the operations room at Sector 10 HQ Unit (Oshakati). I was ordered to report to the ops room to man the radios by Col. E Viljoen, the second in command of the unit, who informed me that two troopers of 1 SSB (seconded to the 10th Panser Troopers) walked into a "kraal", unaware of two enemy soldiers that was hidding in one of the huts. The two troopers, Cloete and van Heerden, received fatal shots from the enemy within the hut after identifying themselves to the local population of the kraal. Van Heerden was apparently shot through the forehead with a Makarov pistol and died instantly. Cover fire was laid down by the 10th Panser Troopers which killed the enemy soldiers in the subsiquent battle that took place. I wrote the incident report down for the ops officer on duty who forward it to Army HQ (Pta) in sitrep form.

See incident of J van Z van Heerden also of 1 SSB.



2001-05-30 13:37:59
225I was standing in the chow line that morning, it was hot and muggy, as always, standing in front of me was Van Heerden. Little did I know that later that day, I would be called out to attend the incident, as I was crew commander on 6x6 Muscle, ratel "re-action force" 10 panzer, along with my buddy's from "A" squadron, We arrived at the infamous kraal, where my two brothers in arms were lying dead, having been shot by a TURR, supposedly seated in the darkness of a kraal, holding a pistol at the door, as the two walked in. I will never forget firing my first round at the Kraal, with my turrent mounted five "0" browning, it was unfortunately my last as well, as the second round jammed in the breach-block, and that was the end of that, I grabbed my R5, and continued firing at the kraal, as the remaining 4 noddy's fired with all they had, flattening the trees around the kraal, and enveloping the entire kraal area, and its structures in huge leaping flames, as everyone cried, tears streaming down their faces, firing away. The heat emminating from the kraal was so intense, and we where all soo close, we had to retreat slightly, as the flames lept higher and higher. The only thing that survived from the kraal, was a stray cat, I saw it running away, from my elevated position from the ratel. I return the next day, with the CMDNT, and the story that was going to be spun to their parents, was that they died having discovered a munitions cache under the pig stye pit, thereby presenting thier folks with a credible fabrication, that would ease the reasons from their son's death. We drove back to Oshakati, were assembled by the ranking CPT, and had an "Op-Fok" session for 3 hours, we were forced to crawl through the KAK GAT, but many refused. The CPT offered water in jerry cans, and promptly kicked the precious liquid onto the ground in front of us, ..only to be met with laughter and clapping, from the squadron..well done CPT !! We apperently had to learn our lesson for being too relaxed in the operational area, somehow I doubt that the CAPT's methods were the correct way of achieving this. To Cloete and Van Heerden, I didn't know you well, but will never forget you guys, "Hamba Gathle", god bless, and thanks for watching our backs. Wayne Sardinha L/CPL - 1SSB (1987-1988)

2005-04-17 00:12:58
225

I Bazil Johnson (2Lt) 1987. Reading the story of the two troops that were shot while searching a kraal is still so vivid in my memory. I was the ops-officer on duty that day when the call came through to the control room that the platoon had drawn fire and that two boys were down. The speed that myself and the signalers reacted to get the major in the ops room and to contact the choppers for a casavac was amazing. This was the first time in my 2 years national service that I visibly saw empathy in the voice and face of a PF company commander as he was speaking to the platoon commander. I had to repeatedly ask the chopper pilots to get out there, to no avail. They refused stating that they will not fly their machines where the possibility exists that they could be taken out. The value of a chopper was more than a national serviceman's life. I would for the rest of my life from that day have no respect for chopper pilots. My task thereafter was to right the casavac and situation reports to be sent to pretoria, etc. The shocking realisation for me was the age of only 18 or 19 years of each of them. And they were dead and I was only 20 and had on many occasions with my platoon from 2 SAI Infantry, residing in the same base, inspected kraals just like this one. Rest in peace my fellow soldiers from that time. If only we were in that war for the right reasons!!!

bazil johnson
baziljohnson@hotmail.com
2010-02-28 21:43:08
225Please feel free to contact me with regards to the death of my two friends . There were four people walking into the kraal that day . Two of us survived . JJ did not die instantly . He passed away after we removed him from the kraal with me right next to him . Thereafter we flattened the kraal with 4 x Eland . I was his best friend at that stage and were fortunate to fly back to S A to attend both their funerals . Had to return to border next day and were not allowed to speak to anyone about the incident . Van Heerden died by Makarof pistol & Cloete by grenade scrapnel . 2 x Choppers collected their remains . This all happened not too far from Oshakati on a normal day patrol . We were later deployed to Angola Isak van Heerden 83251074 BG
isak@edelweiss.co.za
2016-10-18 06:25:04
228Lt. Richard Glynn (not Clynn) was shot down in a Bosbok on the night of 03 Sept '87 whilst engaged in an operational sortie directing artillery fire onto targets in Angola. He was 20years old.A.D. Parker

2006-09-13 14:01:02
230I was in the same action as Dylan, base attack on SWAPO. Dylan was one of the intelligence officers, his grave is in Winterton, near where his family farmed and near where I farmed. We used to visit every year when I lived in the country and we planted a paper bark and thorn tree there over his grave so he would have a little shade where he rests. Even though it was long ago I remember it like yesterday, the caspar's of 101 driving past they were to be the "stopper group"
Dylan was with one of these vehicles. The base was bigger than thought and as always polititions wouldn't allow the neccessaty support required to attack a base as big as this one, so no support 2 81 mortars and a half arsed impala attack, 11 died on that day and a lot of wounded of which I was one, so perhaps this is why I feel it more than most when I limp along But I always think of Dylan most. I've been to his grave several times since leaving SA but not for some 9 years now I hope he is resting well under the shade of the tree 
near to the Drakensberg, his body ests there and my heart still longs to be there 
Sean
sencol@xtra.co.nz
2012-01-21 13:55:46
230Bob was a wonderful chap. I have visited his grave and praised God for his life. I knew him at 5 Recce. More some other time. RIP Bob

Chris Scales
cfscales@gmail.com
2013-05-25 16:03:35
230Bobsfamily have lifted his remains and donated the tomb stone to Maritzburg College. We had a fitting unveiling at the College chapel on Saterday 25th of May 2013. His Dad and brothers were there. It was such a fantastic day and brings some closure. Dylan would be proud!!Miles Jackson
mgjackson67@yahoo.com
2013-05-27 07:16:26
230I was Bob Cobbold???s platoon instructor at SA Intelligence School in 1986. He was a great guy, there were a number of College old boys in my platoon, Slab McKenzie, Vic Hogg etc are the names I remember. I recommended that Bob go on officers course and I heard later that after he got rank he went to 5 Recce as an Intelligence Officer, a monument to his dedication and character, only the best went there. I then personally volunteered for 1 Parachute Battalion and ended up there and later at 44 Parachute Brigade. His death on Operation Firewood came as a shock to me as were the deaths of the Delta Coy Parabats who died there too. My second cousin, Werner Oberholzer was killed in Ops Protea in the early 80s and I remember the grief my family went through at the time. I can only imagine how terrible all of this must have been for Bob???s parents and family, even 30 years after the fact. I hope all is well with you. I will never forget Bob Cobbold and his ultimate sacrifice, a brave man.Hulme Scholes, formerly Lt JH Scholes, 44 Parachute Brgd
hscholes@mweb.co.za
2017-10-28 02:08:12
231

Schackleton 1718 crashed in the Stetteynskloof mountains near Rawsonville in the Western Cape after encountering bad weather on a training exercise, with the loss of all 13 crew members. The aircraft was on it's way to join a Royal Navy ship taking part in "Capex" off Port Elizabeth.

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-21 21:55:33
233I am pretty sure this is Iggie Coetzee from Platoon 3, Ops Company SAMS. He was killed by a landmine while on patrol in Owamboland. The company had a minute of silence for him at the time of his funeral.Colin van Rensburg
cvanr45@iway.na
2013-04-05 12:31:28
236

 

Kamieskroon - Military vehicle accident

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-21 21:56:46
236Leon (Pokkel) was my oom aan my Pa se kant. Hy was PF in die Lugmag. Ek dink hy was op Ysterplaat gestasioneer. Hy was in die proses om goedere te vervoer toe die voertuig waarin hy was van die pad geloop het en hy verongeluk het.Floris Coetzee
floris.coetzee@bme.co.za
2015-07-01 08:10:53
237

Ops area - enemy action - contact

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-21 22:04:31
237wally coetzee died in an ambush near Hacaondo, Angola at a waterhole.
nil
nil
2011-01-13 20:21:17
239

De Doorns - Military vehicle accident - Motorcycle accident

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-21 22:15:56
241

Shaun Hammond (SHammond@tu.gov.ab.ca)

Date sent: Fri, 13 Aug 1999 10:27:25 -0600

John

241: Rfn H.D. Coker.

I went to school with Dudley Coker. Quiet reliable guy, a decent man. He did his NS at the same time I did; I believe he was with 3SAI (Grahamstown?). Dudley was killed as a result of a motor vehicle accident involving his section being transported in (as I recall) one of those miserable Gladiators. There was a bad crash and fire, with the troops trapped in the rear. The word spread quickly around the SAI Battalions about the incident, leaving all of us with a sick feeling about the losses. RIP.

Shaun Hammond

Shaun Hammond
SHammond@tu.gov.ab.ca
2001-05-30 00:00:00
241

13 Sep 1970: Six members from 5 SAI and one member from 3 SAI were killed while being transported in a Gladiator Troop Carrier back to Ladysmith Army Camp. Their vehicle was involved in a head-on collision with a Newspaper Delivery Van between Colesburg and Philippolis and the vehicle immediately burst into flames with the men still trapped inside.

The casualties were:

  • 241 66458696N Rifleman Hilton Dudley Coker (3 SAI). He was 19.
  • 528 65395287N Rifleman John Grinyer (5 SAI). He was 20.
  • 808 6732700N Rifleman Peter Alfons Ernst Leonhardt (5 SAI). He was 19.
  • 85368238567N Rifleman Kevin Eric Mack (5 SAI). He was 18.
  • 90368444918N Rifleman Richard Neville Marriott (5 SAI). He was 17.
  • 108868222322N Rifleman Gregory George Olyott (5 SAI). He was 18.
  • 144868307446N Rifleman Mark Felice Vallero (5 SAI). He was 18.
John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2014-09-13 10:12:53
243

In 1983 Donald was on patrol in the operational area. His unit was ambushed and Donald was hit across the body by a burst of RPD machine gun fire.

My heart breaks for those that died and those that lived.

Our youth was wasted.

S.Porter
portershaun@yahoo.com
2007-02-04 12:36:04
243

this is a correction as to the facts of Donalds death.Donald took a hit from a mortar bombwhile moving out of an ambush zone

s.porter
portershaun@yahoo.com
2010-03-24 12:26:28
243I knew Don from basics.He was always going to be in the thick of the fighting. From the first 3 months in ETALI camp he proved this.His section was very dedicated to him and there was always an aura of comraderie within it.They all came from Natal if I can recall. In 1978 I went up to operation Askari with Fighting group Delta. On the way up I met with one of the men in that section. It was here where I heard of Dons passing. If I have the story straight this is how he felt it unfolded. Dons platoon had been ambushed. In the initial fighting he sustained a wound and had to himself retreat for medical assistance. This entailed leaving his men and going through a dry river bed to medical assistance. Once patched up he started to make his way back to his men on the other side of the dry river. He met his men retreating and at precisly this moment a motor landed amongst them. Apparently there were 2 more men from the original 1978 section that were also killed and there wounded.I have never been able to verify the story or who were the other men. Don was in my eyes a true leader and somebody we all looked up to.God Bless his soul and those of the rest of the old section. I know for them that survived the scars will never heal. Having served with them was a proud moment.Lance Graven
lance@specialisedoils.com
2017-08-15 21:24:56
244Robert Condo served with me in the dog unit based at Bourkes` Luck. He died during a training exercise.White CJ
whitecolinj@gmail.com
2012-01-17 02:03:49
248James was one of the nicest guys at Buffalo, he always had a smile on his face.
I was not present at the incident but about five kilometers away and heard gunshots and radio communications. 
The bats who were in our area, and were obviously not adequately informed as to our presence, came across Jame's platoon and opened fire assuming they were enemy (being black troops) James tore his shirt open and stood up facing the oncoming fire to indicate they were not enemy and took four bullets to the chest.
By laying low he may have saved his own life at the cost of his troops, I believe James's actions epitomizes what 32BN was really about.
Clinton
clinton@emailhome.co.za
2010-10-04 21:08:28
248JAMES CONROY was a good friend of mine and I really enjoyed his company -always had a good laugh -I was in DELTA 15 When I heard of his death ! Respect to you and Salut James ! Anton Hart Anton Hart
anton.hartbrokers@gmail.com
2017-05-29 06:56:52
250

Corporal Tim Conway served in Ovamboland during 1976. It was here one evening, that his unit came under sustained mortar and machine gun fire by insurgents. Corporal Conway was fatally wounded by shrapnel during the opening engagement. (see person No.1662 also)

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2006-02-27 13:46:12
250 I was Tim's platoon leader atthe time. We we in base in "no-mans-land" a few hundred metres south of the Angolan border. I recall that afternoon the mail arrived and Tim was one of the few who got a parcel from home. We had an Int Cpl visiting us and that night at about 21:00 one of our lookouts reported what appeared to be torch light beams flashing about 1 to 2 kms away. Shortly after that we heard the thump of mortars being fired and we all ran for our dugout positions. Tim went to check on the Int Cpl, being concerned that he would not know where to go. On running toward his dugout with the Int Cpl following the first mortar exploded something like +-15 meters from Tim and he went down having taken schrapnel in the chest. He was given immediate medical treatment and then CASEVAC'd and died on route.John Mellitchey
johnmellitchey@gmail.com
2012-01-06 11:30:07
250

I served with Tim in the same platoon but not in the same section. Earlier the day of 16 December 1976 we spend some time together during the day chatting about the love ones back home. Enjoying some of the eats that we received from the states. The attack happened just after stand to the evening of 16 December 1976. We heard the enemies mortar base plates and I immediately realized we are under attack. It felt like forever before the first mortar shell landed near our base. The attack lasted about 40 min but it felt like hours. Soon after the noise ended I heard someone moaning and realized one of us were hurt and soon afterward heard that it was Tim. He was taken to a tent and preparations started to have him CASAVACTED. I went to see him and his first question was ???if all his men are OK???. I assured him they were OK and that was the last time I saw him alive. They CASAVACTED him but soon afterwards we were informed he died. I was then told I must take over his section. At that stage I was a youngster of 21 sitting with a section in mourning. It was not easy but we pulled through. I just want to take the opportunity to salute my old army buddy.

SSERS AJ de Villiers
kobus10@mweb.co.za
2012-10-10 09:59:08
252Edward, Stephen Cooper was born on 15 November 1970 in Port Elizabeth. He died on 31 July 1989 in Lohatlha in a Samel accident. He is survived by his parents, June and Johnny Cooper, His sister Jackie and brother Robert. After more than 20 years still sadly missed and always loved. June Cooper (Mother of Edward Cooper)
journey@mwebbiz.co.za
2010-04-01 15:21:54
252

Edward was a bright and charming young man and his loss was sorely felt, he was doing his battle phase training at Lohatla Army Battle School as part of his NCO's course when he was tragically killed in an Samel accident. His unit was the South African Corps of Military Police - Provost School. His name was also on the honor roll at PE command when I was based there as Lieutenant. 

God of our fathers, known of old--

Lord of our far-flung battle line--
Beneath whose awful hand we hold
Dominion over palm and pine--
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget--lest we forget!

AG Edwards
edwardsct@gmail.com
2010-07-24 06:52:05
253Not sure if I've got the right Cooper, but he could have been the one who fell asleep under the Samil and got reversed over... very sad!

2001-05-30 13:37:59
253Cpl James Cooper (Regiment Algoa Bay) was in command of a Buffel while on patrol in KwaNobuhle, Uitenhage during the "State of Emergency" 1986. On crossing an intersection, an oncoming vehicle drove into the Buffel, wedging between front and rear wheels. This caused it to flip head over. It is very unfortunate that Cpl Cooper died in this incident. He was a good man, in both military and civilian worlds.Roc W
antheawilson@telkomsa.net
2016-04-16 03:17:59
254Glen was a good friend...I knew him well. He got the nickname "Chapstick" as he was a medic who handed out chapsticks for sore lips. I knew him from spending a lot of time on patrol with him and he was a sweet and gentle guy with a great understanding of his job as patrol medic.
It was during an ops from Ombalantu that some of our guys ran into an old terr base and detonated some booby trapped explosives. There were some casualties and the medic on standby was sitting drinking his first beer of the evening in his PT clothes... he got called to get his kit to go out with the chopper when Chappie walked in still in his full uniform and said that he felt like going out anyway. He grabbed his kit and rifle and took off to the sick bay to get the doctor and I saw them walking to the waiting chopper on the other side of the skietwal... the chopper took off. It was late afternoon..possibly around 17h00 or 18h00.
The following details I have gleaned over the years and pieced together what might have been what happened.
Apparently they found some troops who had been injured and one killed by the boobytraps. They had stabilised the injured ons and were carrying one to the waiting chopper on a regular army canvas stretcher...Chappie at the front and the doctor behind...Chappie stepped on a vehicle size mine which would have been triggered by a anti personnel pressure plate... or smaller mine. The explosion effectively disintegrated him and killed the person on the stretcher too. The doctor behind was saved by the body on the stretcher absorbing the blast, but he suffered a lot of sand shrapnel blast and I recall him back at base in a stretcher being casevaced to Grootfontein. He was concerned about his eyes as the blast had sent sand into his face.
The doctor didnt say anything about Chappie... and none of us put two and two together at the time. We assumed that Chappie was on a chopper tending to hurt troops on the way to Oshakati or Ondangua. Later that evening at around 21h00 I was called by the company 2IC and told that "some medic, Coppard" had been killed... and asked if he was in our company.
I remember standing at the famous old baobab tree, absolutely distraught...I sat there in the dark for quite some time before I went back to the tent and told the other guys who were there. We were all good buds and the news was awful. We never found out anything about how he died.
Years later I spoke to someone who had been at Grootfontein and had processed all the killed in action bodies. He recalled a body bag coming in almost empty but for a boot with a foot in it. Other details seemed to match the bigger picture.
Chappies was from Joburg and I believe he left behind a mother and a sister. I cannot recall if his parents had separated or if his dad had died.
Glen was a good friend and we got along well. He was a really good guy.

JB
johannwessels@hotmail.com
2012-06-23 12:19:12
254Glen and I did our medical orderly training together at SAMS in April / May 1978 and after this we went back our respective units; he to Middleberg and me to Tempe. He and his family were the most hospitable people during this time and thereafter; his mother being the most caring of people to the national servicemen who stayed in their house. The news of his death was shattering. To see his name on television that Sunday night in Aug 1979 was a gut blow. Why should such a such great, caring person like this meet an untimely end like while looking after wounded colleagues ? And in such a horrendously brutal manner. In April 2017 when in Pretoria I was compelled to visit the two SADF memorials (near the Voortrekker Monument and Fort Klapperkop) to pay him the respect he is due. Rest in peace. Gavin Cooper
gavin1959@iafrica.com
2017-08-03 02:52:30
257

He was the RSM of 5 Maintenace Unit and was killed by an landmine explosion

Knight P. J.
pietknight@polka.co.za
2010-07-22 19:56:21
258

Douw was killed in a RTA whilst on a mission to LBG Grootfontein. His Convoy was returning from Rundu.

Unknown
Unknown
2008-10-22 09:59:06
258

21 Sep 1988: 86231719BG Rifleman Douw Cornet from 7 SAI attached to 202 Battalion SWATF was killed when his Buffel Troop Carrier overturned at Mashari. He was 19.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-21 12:44:56
260

Costello was trajically killed near Rucana in 1983 by a bunch of drunken 101BN behind a Patmor during a training exercise.

Steve

2008-03-11 18:05:23
26012 Sep 1983: 82200346BG Rifleman Michael Anthony Costello from 7 SAI was killed in a military motor cycle accident. He was 20.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-12 12:17:25
261F.P. Couvelis was with Regiment Erongo, SWATF when he died on May 13th 1983, just outside Cahama Stephen Walker
uniglide@ozemail.com.au
2010-04-13 09:53:32
262John Harold Cox was stationed as a pilot on Impala light fighter aircraft at 5 Squadron, Air Force Base Durban (5 Sqn, AFB DBN).  On 10 Nov 75 he was en route on a low-level flight from Durban to Bloemfontein (AFB Bloemspruit) where 5 Sqn were scheduled to do a Weapons Camp at the De Wet Bombing Range.  The weather was bad and when they departed from Durban and deteriorated gradually as they progressed on route.  Unfortunately they flew into the ground near Nottingham Road.  He had a passenger in the back seat, a Corporal (name not known).  Both were keilled when the Impala Mk1 struck the ground
Anton Kriegler
antonkr@telkomsa.net
2011-08-04 14:40:26
263

O/Kpl. Carl Creamer was verbonde aan 8 SAI. Bn. Alpha kompanie.Op daardie stadium het ons diens gedoen vanaf Oshigambo, in 53 Bn.

Die presiese datum ontgaan my, maar dit was op 'n Donderdag oggend in Febr. 1983. toe hy en sy makkers in 'n landmyn voorval betrokke was.

O/Kpl. Creamer was die enigste oorledene. Van die ander lede het baie ernstige beserings opgedoen.

WAS DIT DIE MOEITE WERD GEWEES !!!!!!!!!!!



2001-05-30 13:37:59
263

I remember the day is if it was yesterday ... not the date ... just the day ...

We were doing a stint at Oshigambo (Google earth). Craemer was in our platoon, and yes, as the previous writer witnessed, just made L/CPL due to his fantastic organisational skills and leadership abilities. It was a day of deep sorrow indeed. Here's a man with so much in his favour, and he was removed from us in an eyewink! If I'm not mistaken, he was either busy with varsity, or would just have started ... As the previous writer asked ... WAS DIT ALLES DIE MOEITE WERD !!!

L/Cpl Craemer had to leave Oshigambo (Latitude: 17° 47'19.45"S Longitude: 16° 4'45.07"E) early that morning to go and get provisions in Ondangwa (Latitude: 17° 52'30.10"S Longitude: 15° 57'7.53"E). A team of sappers swept the road between Ondando (Latitude: 17° 54'16.49"S Longitude: 16° 2'45.48"E), and Oshigambo every day to check for mines. Due to the early departure of L/CPL's Craemer's convoy (7 am), they bundu-bashed all the way next to the gravel road, in a southerly direction as they knew that the sappers were not done yet.

This is the worst bit ... they emerged from the bush just in front of Ondando and upon doing so, the Sappers busy sweeping, saw them. They all waved and Craemer's convoy continued to Ondangwa. What we heard after the incident was that the Sappers thus assumed that the 2-Buffel convoy travelled all the way from Oshigambo on the gravel road, and they subsequently ceased their sweeping activities for the day, as they thought 'the road was clear'.

When Craemer's convoy returned from Ondangwa, they assumed that the sappers completed the sweeping, and continued north on the gravel road back towards Oshigambo. A light drizzle broke out, whereafter Craemer stopped and told the troops to take out their ground-sheets for covering. Apparently this was +/- on a horizontal line between Oneputa and Lyakahani. (Latitude: 17° 51'2.54"S Longitude: 16° 5'0.19"E). Craemer was the the driver of the 1st Buffel. According to eye-witnesses in the 2nd Buffel, as he pulled away, still busy fastening his belts, the Buffel apparently detonated 3 cheese mines on each front wheel, with horrible consequences. Craemer was casavaced in a chopper, and we heard later that morning that he passed away.

I still have the photos of the wreck after it was towed back to Ondangwa base.

Our deepest sympathy and condolences to his family, which we beleived were either only his Father and Mother, or an elder brother as well.

Up till today, we SO miss you CPL Craemer ! A man who we all looked up to !

If I remember correctly, some of the names that come to mind who 'we' constituted was ... Herbert Atkinson, Piet Beetge, Bees Bezuidenhoudt, Brian Jones and Neels le Grange (who I think drove the 2nd Buffel).

Jaco du Preez, 8 SAI, Alpha Company, Peloton 5
jjdup@worldonline.co.za
2008-04-27 22:58:24
263Carel Leopold Albert Craemer was born 27-5-62 Date of death is 3/2/83 His unit was 8 SAI A Comp Force No 80536899BG I add the info on behalf of his mother.JP Nel
jp@tfn.co.za
2015-12-26 02:55:27
263Ek was die bevelvoerder van Craemer se buffel. De Preez se beskrywing is redelik akkuraat, behalwe dat ek die bevel gegee het om te stop sodat ons re??njasse kan aantrek. Het ons nie gestop nie dink ek die lewensverlies sou groter gewees het. Ek het die 3de Febr 2016 weer aan die gebeure gedink en vra ook nog altyd of dit alles die moeite werd was. Klomp manne se lewens is na die dag verander. As hulde hierdie ooit lees, maak kontak met my.Dirk Postma
d.postma@vodamail.co.za
2016-02-05 13:54:14
263Dirk, ek was seksieleier op 2de buffel net agter julle. . Barries Barnard
hercules@lantic.net
2017-08-31 04:44:30
265

Michael's dad "Doc" Craul was my mother's (Lynette Robertson) cousin. I was 12/13 at the time of Mike's death. My mother told me that Mike was killed by a gunshot when one of the guards on duty went "bossies". He spent a few days with my family during a vacation at Stilbaai. Although the contact we had with him was only occasional he made an impression on me as a child because he was so vibrant, fun, full of life. On occasion we had lunch with his parents at the Picardie Hotel in Paarl, a BIG treat for a kid! His parents were the owners (or managers I am not sure) of the hotel during that time.

Yvette Naude (Cronje)
yvette.naude@up.ac.za
2007-05-10 09:31:58
265WO11 M.G. Craul died in a shooting incident at Ondangwa on 14 November 1976.

Information extracted from www.moth.org.za
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2009-11-17 01:25:18
267

At the bottom of one of John's photos, marked "memorial", is a Sktr DP Croezer. He was at school with me and active in Settlers High cadets, at that stage affiliated to the Regiment and dominated by SSgt Tex Silva.

I am told he was killed when his vehicle was taken out by an RPG. His brother was apparently in the same vehicle at the time and was later posted to CTH.

Andre Van Der Bijl
bija@iafrica.com
2001-07-17 14:03:01
267

I was on the same patrol on this fateful day and in 1983 I went on another mission called Operation Askari when I lost another rifleman by the name of Callie Fourie. I will never forget Croeser and Fourie. You will always be the real heroes of this damned war we fought.

Rest in peace.
Anthony Kruger
mwnatfin@mweb.co.za
2009-09-19 22:15:58
274

EEN VAN DIE 7 GOUDVELDERS



2009-06-23 04:15:21
274GP DA Silva was een van die Goudvelders wat op 6 jan 1983 in die Kaokoveld naby Etengua omgekom het in n Landmyn insident. Sover my kennis strek is sy graf ook in die Helde-akker vir SAW en SAP lede in Welkom se begrafplaas.. Die ander lede te wete: P.Uzzel ,BJ du Toit,FM Griessel,JL vd Merwe,JH Diederichs.RIV.Sodeliet Sapper
rowallan@tiscali.co.za
2013-04-19 07:37:33
276

Military Vehicle Accident.

Unsure whether he was 31 or 32 Battalion?

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2002-11-25 08:44:37
281Sgt K G Dalgleish was killed on 5 January 1982 whilst being a flight engineer on a Puma piloted by Capt J Robinson and Lt M Earp. They were doing trooping between Ondangwa and southern-Angola when shot down. I believe there were 13 troops killed with them in the crash.

2003-05-31 11:02:21
282You are definitely missed not only by your immediate family but all your cousins, uncles and aunts. you were a wonderful cheerful person sadly missed, you could have gone on in life and become some great.Shane Dammert
dammert@cybersmart.co.za
2007-02-16 16:26:41
284

This is probably "Daniels, J." from the list on the Klapperkop Monument

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-20 14:49:51
287

We served in the same PLT and Section, I was the section leader. Brave and dedicated man. Stayed in Swaziland and did NSM as a volunteer if I remember correctly. RIP always thinking of you and Forbes.

Trompie Terblanche
hpcsharks@gmail.com
2011-06-08 16:01:38
288Lieutenant Day was a Sabre pilot who crashed his aircraft in the Pilanesberg in the vicinity of where Sun City was to be built. Newspaper clipping can be provided if necessary.Marius Ackermann
mariusackermann@gmail.com
2011-02-02 11:19:41
289

On 11 February 1985, a patrol from 32 Battalion's Charlie Company were in the vicinity of the Bale River, when their over-eager company commander took a short cut, against earlier advice from headquarters, and blundered straight into a well-prepared SWAPO base, manned by some 100 insurgents. In the 25 minute battle that ensued, Charlie Company suffered heavy casualties.

In all, 12 men from Charlie Company were killed in this action or died of their wounds soon afterwards, and many more were wounded. The seven fatalities in the inital contact were:

  • Lieutenant Dave Light (killed instantly by a bullet that struck him below his left eye).
  • Rifleman P. Kahete (severe schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman A. de Almeida (a gunshot that penetrated both lungs)
  • Rifleman P. Jose (multiple schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman K. Kalonga (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Rifleman J.C. Chihamba (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Lance Corporal J.A. Sachilombo (multiple schrapnel wounds, including to abdomen)

After dark, while the casualties were being moved to a temporary emergency base, another three wounded men, all suffering from massive chest wounds, died. They were

  • Riflemen J. Fernando,
  • M. Joaquim and
  • M. Chipoya.
  • During the night another badly wounded Rifleman, M.A. Kinguelke, also died. The final death was that of Rifleman M. Muema, who succumbed to his schrapnel wounds at 10:00 the next morning.

    Later, radio intercepts indicated that SWAPO lost 15 men killed and a number wounded in this contact, and a further two SWAPO insurgents were killed by Charlie Company and one captured when they approached the base on the morning of 12th February.

    Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-09 09:19:02
296I did JL's with Guy in Oudtshoorn A Company 1984, our pathes parted when we both got different postings on the border. I later heard, (although after all this time I am not to clear on the details)he was shot and killed by one of his own troops.

2002-11-15 22:30:20
296Guy was an only son to a single parent (his mother). I knew Guy having attended high school with him and also through other social activities. Guy's death at the hands of one of his troops was a tragedy and a shock that affected many people. I often think of Guy and the other young men like him who paid the ultimate price in South Africa's bush war.RS

2008-08-25 13:52:12
296guy was in actual fact killed by sakk troop who wounded the platoon sarge in same incident,i was in 101 bn and visited the tent at echo tower if memory serves me correctly.what a shame! craig
info@theanchorage.com
2010-10-26 13:31:06
296So glad I found Guy listed here, I did Jl's with him in '84 He was in my company and if I remember correctly my Platoon, (It was a long time ago). I seem to recall he was posted to the SAKK and was doing a Boarder tour at the time, I was serving in 101Bn at the time and heard he was in the area and was hoping to hook up with him sometime soon when I got the news that he was shot by one of his troops after he reprimanded the troop for being drunk. I remember him with great fondness, often thinking of him over the years. Probably my fondest memory of him was he could never keep hold of his bush hat, lost it all the time. I seem to recall there would always be one "Staal Dak" in the ranks every time we fell in, there would be Guy with his helmet bouncing around on his head while the rest of us wore our Bush hats.
I will remember you always Guy, you will never be forgotten and as we who served with you grow old and grey, you stay forever young in my heart.
Sean Leask
sleask@sky.com
2012-07-18 04:45:39
29812 Sep 1987: 87094348CK Rifleman Fanie de Bruin from the South African Cape Corps was killed when his Buffel vehicle overturned during a contact and subsequent hot pursuit operation against insurgents in Northern Owamboland. He was 21.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-12 12:39:17
304We went through basics at 2 special services,shared a tent with Frikki ,endured 2 weeks of rain and mud at rooisloot spanbevs course and we attended a radio comms exercise at zeerust partook in bondel sport at 2ssb and more Frikki was a short medium built guy with straight brown hair and rounded face ,he had an infectious smile and was always so calm spoken and polite with a good sense of humor, what a brother, always got along with everyone. Frikki was asleep in the back of his ratel 90 . We had just travelled through the night in convoy , moving further into Angola and closer to cuito. Im not sure which element we we engaging next, there were so many.i was in the command ratel 3 zero ahead at the edge of a shona taking cover in the trees just before daybreak, as there were inevitably going to be bogies flying another sortie, looking for us, we had to deploy camo nets and fox holes before the sun broke the skyline.We had not received any signals to warn us that morning,but from experince the bogies didnt usually fly before 7 am. we were in this state, i was on top of the ratel dropping the camo net when i heard the high whinning of those mig engines getting clearer and louder .i guess they flew undetected by flying under the radar. knowing instantly that it was not friendlies i screamed at the top of my lungs "bogies" and jumped on the radio to warn the entire column behind us ,about 3 or four clicks. It was then that i saw them, tree top height side by side comming up the shona directly at us,,my heart sank when i realized this may be it. Not moving that fast, less that 100 meters away, their helmets so white with the red star so clear. The star on the forward cockpit and that sandy color, no mistaking the mig 21. so close, that if i had my R4 in my hand , i swear i could have put a round right in his head. i could not believe they did not open fire or drop the bomb,,but they had other intentions. It was not us they saw it was the dust trail they tracked. It was too late,,some were still digging fox holes ,some were still pulling down the camo nets,but Frikki had been driving all night and so lay down on the bench in the back . The bogies climbed and released their single 500 pounders. As they descended on parachute, everyone saw and scrambled . Pierman-White was running when shrapnel from one explosion severed his leg above the top of the boot, and he fell to the ground. Unfortunately the other landed right behind Frikkis ratel , shoving its rear literally into the ground. all the 90mm ammo inside , which was in racks right behind frikki started going off, and left nothing of poor frikki. there were more casualties from this incident including echelon. Rest in peace brother, Brad Saunders
brad@swmedical.com
2009-01-10 19:53:20
307

One of a squad of Parabats from 1 Parachute Battalion, he was flying in a SAAF SA-330C Puma helicopter, # 132, which was transporting men from 1 Parachute Battalion, when the helicopter was shot down by enemy 23 mm AA fire south-east of Cuvelai in Angola, crashing inverted. None of the Parabats or SAAF crew survived. The Parabats who died that day are commemorated on the Wall of Rememberance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein.

Peter
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2007-12-31 04:58:58
307I believe that he grew up in Rheederspark, Welkom, in the Free State and attended Welkom High School. The name, the date, the unit and the manner of KIA are all consistent. C Daniel
clem.j.daniel@gmail.com
2010-08-10 11:53:04
307I remember meeting him in 1981 or 1982 when he was on leave.  He had two younger brothers; I was friends with his youngest brother, Colin.  Colin and I went to Christian Brothers College.  This was in Welkom.  He made a good impression and was obviously very paraat.  Their father had been killed in a mine accident, if I recall correctly.Anonymous
the.grey.wolf@lycos.com
2012-03-17 08:41:45
310

13 Sep 1987: Six members of 32 Battalion were Killed in Action in a single incident during Ops Modular in Southern Angola.

A 32 Battalion Anti-Tank Ratel 90, Callsign 13, Commanded by 2/Lieutenant Jose Raymond Alves became bogged down in a muddy shona while engaging FAPLA manned Soviet T-55 tanks. Before the men could extricate themselves, their Ratel 90 was hit and destroyed at point blank by a Soviet T-55 tank shell. The tank round penetrated the Ratel through the side door and detonated inside the main ammunition storage container. This resulted in an explosion within the Ratel causing the vehicle to catch fire. The Ratel crew and passengers were all killed instantly in the explosion. The burnt out Ratel was later destroyed by SADF Engineers to prevent its capture. Captain Alfred Desmond McCallum was the Commanding Officer of Foxtrot Company.

Those Killed in Action were:

  • 74316175PK Captain Alfred Desmond McCallum. He was 28
  • 83502815BG 2/Lieutenant Jose Raymond Alves. He was 20.
  • 83302422BG Lance Corporal Matthys Michael De Klerk. He was 20.
  • 832441178BG Trooper Marthinus Johannes Kuyler. He was 20.
  • 81533671SP Lance Corporal Joao Rodrigues Mananza. He was 33.
  • 76928621SP Lance Corporal Waite Tchipango. He was 31
Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-15 02:00:28
312

Able Seaman, Platoon 18, Viking Co., SA Marines

Martin Malan
martinmalan@worldonline.co.za
2008-11-14 08:46:07
314Hellsgate Training Area - Parachute Accident John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-04-21 09:15:51
315

Gerhard de Lange and I matriculated at the same school in 1982. In 1984 we were both deployed in Namibia/Angola as part of A-Coy, 1 Para. We were sweeping an area between Ondangwa and Oshikango-my platoon to the east and Gerhard's platoon to the west of the road. A Swapo contingent walked into their TB just after sunset, during stand down, and Gerhard was killed in the contact. I cannot recall the date but it must have been around June 1984 and not January as stated. I was a platoon commander then and Gerhard's platoon commander was 2nd Lt D Benade.

L van der Merwe

2008-02-08 23:20:56
315

I saw his story on a program called grensoorlog on Kyk-net. What a waste of a young life, his mom looked so strong but you could still see the pain of a parent loosing a child although it was a long time ago.



2008-09-24 21:11:02
315Ek was daar die aand, sal Delange nooit vergeet.Theron Theunissen
bali@tvcabo.co.mz
2012-05-16 11:43:05
316 I remember it distinctly. The run-up to the attack was as follows: After the successful operation Reindeer and the battle at Cassinga or (Moscow and Vietnam) bases, SWAPO had to do something to save face and they came up with Ops Revenge. The strategy was to attack and annihilate Katima Mulilo, Wenela, Golf and Mpacha. A force of SWAPO and Zambian military personnel and equipment was gathered on the other side of the river and longer range weapons were positioned along the riverbank between Sesheke and their border post "Katima Mulilo" which was situated just across the newly scraped no-mans land from Wenela Base, which in turn was situated at the point where the Zambezi River turns into Zambia and the so-called Kaplyn started. I was a Gunner and at the time part of a mortar locating crew. We had come to the Caprivi around three months before and were first situated at Golf and Wenela. One day we were still quietly going about our business when the Genie invaded our camp and began to dig in the Ops room and other key buildings and positions. At the time we should have realized that something was happening, but no information was passed on to us. A couple of weeks later a third set was flown up from South Africa and a tower was built at Katima to raise the screen up on to. Our group was then moved to Katima and we began registering enemy positions along the riverbank using the Cymbeline Radar Set to do so. At that time, there were no known co-odinates that could be used to survey in any of our gun positions or those of the Radar Set which would be necessary to be able to give adjustments to the guns at Golf and/or, the mortars at Romeo Zulu which was situated out of town along the river. This was soon remedied as a surveying team arrived from SA and used the known co-ordinates at Mpacha as a base and performed what we called then "trekmeet" all the way from Mpacha to the Radar Platform at Katima, the base at Golf and the mortars at Romeo Zulu. At least we were now on the same grid. From these known points a map of the area was drawn and the co-ordinates of the enemy positions were registered onto the map. Seeing as the Cymbeline could also pick up any metal, we could plot the movement of motorvehicles and equipment across the river and even were able to plot dust roads and paths over a period of time as the people and equipment followed the road and the co-ords could be plotted. When equipment stopped moving and stayed at a position, those positions were listed as possible enemy positions and were registered as targets.This information was also updated onto the other maps at Golf and Romeo Zulu on a regular basis. One day, on the way back from Wenela to Katima, a SWAPO soldier walked out of the bush at the side of the road and handed himself over to us. He was bristling with weapons, had a new set of camo???s on and was fully kitted out. He said that he had been promised that he would be able to go to university in Moscow if he joined and spent some time with the ???Freedom Fighters??? . He stated that he had been with Swapo for three years now and that most of that time they had not had much to eat and that the promises that had been made were not realizing. His kit was full of food at the time, which was totally the opposite of what he was saying and he explained that they had just been issued with new kit, weapons, food etc, but that he had had enough and had decided to hand himself over. We took him to Katima and handed him over to the Intelligence Officer at the base and I believe he supplied them with some much needed info concerning the build-up of forces across the river. So we spent our days at Katima, waiting for the end of our stint. As was always the case in later years, the gunners and the guys from the armour regiments befriended each other as both were and would always be minority groups wherever we served. We played many soccer games against each other and so-doing some of us made some good friends with them. If I remember correctly, trooper Elworthy was an excellent soccer player and had been selected for some or other SADF soccer team as well. Our Radar set was situated at the North Eastern corner of the base and the armour guys were situated on the South eastern side. So, the days went by and we heard that the armour guys were going home. One night , just before their ???aflos??? arrived, the guns were fired at some ???targets??? on the Kaplyn as an exercise and I believe a donkey was killed by mistake. A week or two later, their ???aflos??? arrived and the armour guys had a braai on their last night, the 23rd of August 1978. We said Good Bye to them and they carried on with their braai. If I remember correctly, the guys that were leaving were told to bed down in the bungalows opposite the mess and the new guys took up their duties in the vacated positions. We all wen to bed and at 01h15 all hell broke loose. I remember waking up to a searing sound and then hearing an explosion not far from our position. This was the first 122mm red eye fired on us and it landed in a mielie field behind the base. It was most probably the fastest I have ever moved and we got to our positions even before the next rocket fell. To start the generator of the Radar Set, one had to get up onto the platform and start it there. I can???t remember who did, but the set was immediately started up and we waited for the next shots. From our positions we could hear the bang as the rocket was fired, see the flames of the rocket motor raising up into the sky and then the motor died . The second rocket descended and fell on the Bungalow opposite the mess. It broke through the roof and as per some armament specialists later, exploded about 1 meter above the floor in the bungalow. At that specific moment, many guys were either running toward the specific part of the bungalow where the missile would hit, or were leaving the bungalow. The reason for this was that the bungalow was designed with two exits, one on each side of the long side of the rectangular building, which meant that all personnel had to move to the centre of the building. It was exactly at that point where the rocket hit. If the rocket had hit the bungalow first or if a later rocket had hit the bungalow, there would have been far less effect. At the time, we only heard the explosion, but did not know the effect of it. With the radar up and running, we started giving through target co-ords to the guns at Golf. One of the prime targets was the ferry across the river on which SWAPO and the Zambian army were now ferrying troops, equipment and supplies across the river. I believe the guns took out the fully loaded ferry with the second shot, effectively stopping the stream of troops, equipment and supplies from reaching the near bank. I believe that this was most probably the most important shot of the battle and turned the odds in our favour. After that initial target, we gave through co-ords of all the registered positions along the bank and systematically wiped out the positions, one by one. During this period, we would hear the bangs of the rockets being fired, see the ???red-eye??? in the sky and soon learnt if we needed to take cover or not. Some writers about this incident state that it was mortar fire, but as a gunner, we were well aware of what shrapnel from a shell looked like vs the shrapnel we picked up the next day which definitely was not the same and was identified as coming from a 122mm rocket. I am not stating that there was no mortar fire, but the explosions around us were definitely from ???red-eyes???. About 20 minutes later, we had effectively silenced the positions along the riverbank and the guns started firing at targets around the town of Sesheke, which is roughly opposite Katima Mulilo on the far bank of the Zambezi. I remember that there was an officer that was either looking after the civilians or had quite a lot to do with them while bomb shelters were being built on the southern side of their houses. In the town there was a microphone system and he was consistently warning the civvies and appealing to them to move to the shelters and if they did not have one yet, to take cover on the southern side of their houses. He must have come from the Boland as he rolled his RR???s and supplied some sort of comic relief during these hours. We would listen to the radio and when the command to fire was given, look toward Golf. The night sky would light up, looking like an intense lightning storm, moments later we would hear the whistle of the shells above us and then hear the massive explosions as they hit their targets on the other side of the river. Experiencing that was and still gives me goose bumps. The unadulterated destructive power of those shells is absolutely awesome. I must say that after SWAPO and the Zambian army stopped firing on us, the effect of those shots coming over was extremely heart warming. The firing continued sporadically throughout the early hours of the morning as new targets were identified and fired upon. Lieutenant (at the time) Schalekamp, joined us and later climbed up onto the water tower to give us the co-ords of visible targets and corrections once the first shots had been fired. He spent some time mopping up wherever he found anything worth firing upon. Later that morning we were told that we could go and get something to eat and the bad news of the bungalow being hit was heard. On arriving at the mess and seeing the bungalow, my life changed in an instant. The bungalow was a mess. Parts of the building, kit, you name it, was strewn across the ground. There was a guy who had been appointed to keep the vultures at bay. At the time we did not know it, but ten of our friends and comrades had been killed and another 10 or 20 injured. There was blood everywhere. Most of the dead and injured had been removed from the area, but the evidence of the ferocity of the blast was to be seen everywhere. Standing in line for breakfast, the coffee can was positioned long before the food and guys would fill up their mugs while waiting for their food. While standing there that morning, some idiot pulled off a shot and everybody dived for cover with hot tea and coffee flying everywhere and burning some of the guys. We all sat and ate in silence and went back to our positions. What I had seen that morning has stayed with me all my life since. It has influenced many of my decisions in my life. In many cases the effect has been negative. The loss of life of those troopers that night, guys whom you shared a part of your life with, played soccer with, ate with, joked with, worked with, just suddenly gone, left a scar. The next day the follow-up went into Zambia and a day or two later they brought a truckload of bodies back. I wanted to see what these guys looked like and wanted to see their dead, possibly to satisfy a feeling of retribution. I walked over to the truck and getting closer I could smell death. I looked at these bodies, my enemy, and seeing them like that felt no remorse, no sympathy. They were all in various stages of rigor mortise and were later layed out on the parade ground for the intelligence guys to inspect. The base at Katima is quite close to a township and we were told that part of our tasks were to protect the local population. Funny though, that night there was not a single person in the township. They had known and I could not understand why they had not told us, seeing as new were their ???protectors???. For many years I walked around with an ingrown mistrust of all black people as I could not understand the issues. Furthermore, the fact that we had killed some of the enemy never made up for the losses we had had. It felt as if the guys that were killed died in vain. Especially after 1994. It is only now, and I thank Arn Durand for giving me the answer, that I can say the following: No, they did not die as part of a well known Op, firing on the enemy and walking away as heroes into the sunset. But, they died, running to get to their weapons, ready to serve their country, ready to take part in a battle that was never given a name, but surely would have been given one, had SWAPO and the Zambian Army been able to succeed in their strategy of retribution for Cassinga. KJ BIGGS, HW DE LANGE, AH ERASMUS, GP ERASMUS, JL LESCH, JJR SCHUTTE, GJ SMIT, WS SMUTS, AD VAN DER MERWE, DM ELWORTHY, WHC BRITZ Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres, There is music in the midst of desolation And a glory that shines upon our tears. They went with songs to the battle, they were young, Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted; They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them. They mingle not with their laughing comrades again; They sit no more at familiar tables of home; They have no lot in our labour of the day-time; They sleep beyond Englands foam.Bobby Thomson
warringtons@eccsystems.co.za
2015-08-06 04:03:07
317

Full Names: Jacques de Lange
Unit: 5 Signal Regiment
Date of Death: 21/02/1988
Place of Death: Angola during the war.
Cause of Death: According to an official army report member was killed in an airstrike attack by enemy aircraft.

J.A. Koch
conundrum@webmail.co.za
2001-05-30 15:13:44
317

Little do people know in how much danger the troops of 5 Signal Regiment came into danger while in Angola. 5 Signal Regiment had 3 troops in Northern South West Africa, 511Tp, 512TP and 513Tp. Since most of us were foreign language speakers such as Spanish, Portuguese, Russian and others we were an essential part of the intelligence gathering information body at that time. We deployed many times with the forward recce units with the front line many kilometeres behind us.

Even though I did not know De Lange personally I can testify of the courage we had to display while under attack. Our Vehicle were high priority targets for the FAPLA and Cuban Forces. When we got attacked by air everybody but us could run to their Fox holes or bunkers. We sat like siiting ducks in our vehicles doing our thing. We were not used but abused by the system.

My self and a few others took place in OPS Modular, Hooper, Packer and Displace without leaving the bush. You will always be remebered by your friends: Mushky, Speedy Gonzales, Tony Villar, Granger, Frenchie Macquet, GV Smith, and others.

I will never forget.

Marco
Marco
Unknown
2002-12-14 05:50:32
317

I klaared out some two months before De Lange was killed. I was part of the January 86 intake. Speedy, Villar and Granger were taught, "our thing", by me and a few other guys. I heard that Speedy was present when it happened and was wounded in the chest. I will never forget 513tp. I will never forget the day I left. Speedy, Villar, Granger and I cried like babies. It was something that one cannot explain. How can "manne" cry like that? I still remember the day that Speedy nearly electicuted himself, by cutting a live wire with his teeth, and the drum roll that Villar taught me. To all ex "BRUSH" operators I salute you.

Unknown
Unknown
2003-07-05 01:52:47
317Frik van Loggerenberg "Loggies" 511 TP, Mashari, OndurorunduLoggies
fvanlogg@sunint.co.za
2007-05-28 15:08:58
317

Don't forget Sgt Gerrit Maritz who was killed at the same time. MTSRIP !!!!

Good but scary days - still have dreams about them and was treated for PTSD about 7 years ago.

John P Smith (GV)
zs6an@worldonline.co.za
2009-03-25 16:24:24
317

Any guys out there from the Grootfontein 'BRUSH' base , from the 1981/82 days? Wishing all of you guy's the best.

steve quirke
quirkesp@elec.durban.gov.za
2009-04-24 07:28:43
317

It is amazing that just because people heard that we were in Signals, that we had an easy time up there. I was 512 TP in Mpacha and I remember how the stuff used to fly there.

Used to go out with 32 BN to triangulate enemy positions and get the noodles shot out of us.

Has anyone got a copy of the B.R.U.S.H emblem to email to me

Craig Oosthuizen
craig027@live.co.za
2009-05-02 03:59:40
317

5 Signals Regiment links:

Linked in Group

Stuart's Story

5 SIG on Google Earth

 

JD
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-27 13:27:33
318If anyone knows my brother send me a E-MailWillem de lange
silver.delange@hotmail.com
2013-01-03 22:17:08
320

Hughes De Rose attended Pinetown Boys' High School and did National Service with 1 Parachute Battalion.

While the details of what happened are sketchy, he and his best friend, Raymond Light, also a pupil at Pinetown, were involved in a contact with SWAPO terrorists.

As the fire fight subsided, the group realised that one of these boys were missing.

I'm not sure who went back for who, but at the end of the day, both Paratroopers were dead.

The one had paid the highest price for the other.

parabatchaplain@aol.com
Parabat Chaplain
parabatchaplain@aol.com
2003-05-12 16:27:47
320

Towards the end of 1987 two platoons of D Company (Jan 1986 ? Dec 1987), 1 Parachute Battalion were seconded to 5 Reconnaissance Regiment. The platoons were under command of Capt PA Pienaar (Pine), 2IC of D Coy and the platoon commanders were Lt J de V Kruys and 2Lt F J Wiese.

Together with members of 5 and 2 Reconnaissance Regiments, the members of D Coy took part in an attack on a Swapo base in central Angola. The operation was named Ops Firewood.

The attack commenced at dawn on 31 October 1987 and the SA forces only withdrew after dark on the same day. It was estimated that more than 300 Swapo fighters were killed during the battle.

At the end of the day Cpl N S Olivier, L/Cpl R M Light, Rfn H N de Rose, Rfn D W van Rooyen and Rfn W F Ewels were dead, killed in action. Several other members of D Coy was also wounded during the battle and Rfn J m Schuurman died on 1 November 1987 of his wounds.

Capt P A Pienaar the 2IC of D Coy who was in charge of the two platoons was killed in West Africa almost 10 years later, on 29 October 1997.

The names of these members of D Coy appear on the Wall of Remembrance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein.

We remember our comrades who paid the highest price on that day in 1987. They were all heroes and proud paratroopers.

Ex Alto Vincimus - We Conquer from Above



2003-08-28 14:16:25
320

I fought alongside this man who had great courage! He will always have a special place in my heart. We had some great times back then nearly 21 yrs ago !

Always remembered, never forgotten! Remember fortune favours the brave !

Carl Robberts
bokcarl@live.co.uk
2008-07-03 23:32:50
320De Rose and Light are gone, but not forgotten. It has been 23 years now, but the memory, and pain do not fade. 
We were at the same school and served together at 1 Parachute Battalion.
We all feel the loss, and honour the sacrifice you both made.
With respect, your comrades and friends.
Lance Knepscheld  Cpl Platoon 4 Charlie Company 1 Parachute Battalion, 86-87
Lance Knepscheld
lanceknep@gmail.com
2010-09-06 15:21:39
320Hey buddy miss you guys so much, 25 years today, will never forget the good times. So long Pal enjoy your jumps in that big DZ soft landings till we meet again.
Craig Animal Davel
fultonmaintenance@gmail.com
2012-10-30 00:22:49
323AW De Villiers used to be a member of Quebec battery 62 mechanised battalion (G5's),The battery was busy in ops Modular just north of the Lomba river. AW De Villiers was sent out to find a sutable alternate site for the battery early in the day. The battery was involved with artilery support until late in the night when eventualy we packed up and moved. Unfortunately AW De Villiers had fallen asleep next to a tree that was in the path of the oncoming trucks and guns, AW Deviliers was found later in the tracks left by the convoy.

2002-08-06 08:54:37
32611 Sep 1983: 72232945BG 2/Lieutenant Deon De Villiers from 3 Medical Battalion Group was killed in a military vehicle accident in Bloemfontein. He was 26.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-11 01:35:08
327

In the early hours of Thursday 18 February 1982, SAS President Kruger, oldest of the three Type 12 Frigates of the South African Navy, collided with the replenishment vessel, SAS Tafelberg. Both ships were severely damaged but TAFELBERG returned safely to Simon?s Town. President Kruger sank approximately two hours after the collision when efforts to keep her afloat failed.

14 men from Mess 12, Chief Petty Officers J B Booysen and W M G van Tonder; Petty Officers S A Bothma, G A Brind, R C Bulterman, G W de Villiers, E Koen, H Lotter, R A McMaster, R F Skeates, H W Smit, W R Smith, M B R Whiteley and C J Wium died in the collision and their bodies went down with the ship. A further two men, Chief Petty Officer D Webb and Able Seaman G T Benjamin, lost their lives after the collision and whilst abandoning ship. Of these last named two only CPO Webb?s body was recovered after being sighted by SAS Protea on the morning of 19 February.

See the full story in Three Frigates by Rear Admiral Chris Bennett SAN (Ret)

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2006-06-11 01:08:14
329I was in the same unit as Cmdt Johan de Villiers, Chief of Staff Logistics. He was killed in the bomb explosion in central Pretoria. The bomb was timed to go off just after work when military personnel had left their offices and were on the street waiting for lifts to take them home. He was a very pleasant permanent force career officer who had a wife and family. He was an enthusiastic cyclist and was very fit. A number of other people were killed or injured in the same bomb blast.Chris
chris@jockfs.co.za
2014-11-16 12:48:39
330Crashed following mid-air collision with Piper Pa-31 Navajo ZS-KTX.

2003-09-30 20:09:36
330Crashed following mid-air collision with Piper Pa-31 Navajo ZS-KTX over Swartkops. His co-pilot was Lt Leon Goldstein and their Airhostess was F/Srg Annerie Niemand. 14 people died that tragic day.

2003-09-30 20:23:13
330Jannie De Villiers was my father. Left behind me, my older sister and my mother. I was only 10 months old at the time. If anybody has anymore information regarding the crash please contact me. Elaine De Villiers
hendlerhartofs@telkomsa.net
2007-05-03 09:30:12
330JIT De Villiers - Jannie or Jan to his family and friends and "Jit" to his colleagues died on 14 July 1982 over Laudium while descending to land in a MAC between ZS-KTX and ZS-JLZ.
Jan was born in South West Africa, but lived in South Africa for all of his adult life - he lived in El Doraigne, Verwoerdburg at the time of his death.
He left a wife and two small daughters.
He is still missed.

Colin Beazley (Brother in Law)
Colin@Bespokenet.com
2011-04-21 08:16:23
330My name is Ann, JIT sister in law. Jannie will always be in our hearts. We often think and say a prayer for him. He was a lovely caring husband to Janet and loved his kids. 
He was a very good pilot and this tragic accident should have never happened.  
Ann Bezzina (former De Villiers)
18valletta@gmail.com
2013-07-30 19:44:07
331

29 Sep 1977: Four members from 4 SAI were killed in a friendly fire incident at Okalongo when a soldier who was watching the rear of the ambush position suddenly turned around and opened fire on his fellow soldiers. The soldier in question subsequently appeared in the Windhoek Supreme Court on a charge of murder but was medically diagnosed as having acute schizophrenia and subsequently declared medically unfit to stand trial.

The casualties in this unfortunate incident were:

  • 69206464PE Sergeant Jan Pieter Albertus Furstenburg. He was 24
  • 74413659BB Corporal Leslie Muller. He was 19.
  • 74281734BG Rifleman Jan Joachim Jacobus de Vos. He was 18
  • 74382862BG Rifleman Cornelius Johannes Lourens. He was 19
Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-30 11:37:59
331

J.de Vos was van 4SAI. Grensdiens 1977 in Ovambo by Umungelome Basis. Hy en drie ander Sers Furstenburg, kpl Muller en Lourens het omgekom Sept/Okt 1977 deur eiemagte se vuur. Ek dink de Vos was van Swellendam se omgewing as ek reg onthou. RIP

Jan Louwrens
louwrens@live.co.za
2013-07-05 22:21:45
332Willie De Vos fell in an ambush near beacon 32 on 21 June 1979. (From the book-"Buffalo Battalion by L.J. Bothma")Chris
chrisbester37@yahoo.com
2010-07-06 16:33:01
336Lance Corporal C L "Chris" De Wilzem (Mil no : 73508434) were killed in action in the Gaza Province, Mozambique, during Operation Melon. Chris were part of  D Squadron, Rhodesian Special Air Service.                                         Information:  Rhodesian SAS ROH. Chris Bester
chrisbester37@yahoo.com
2010-11-28 15:51:29
337

I was present where this person died after being shot down during ops Savannah in the Puma helicopter. His death was not due to crash. I tried pulling him out of the burning helicopter but was unable to do so due to heat and exploding ammunition. This was more than an aircraft crash which seems to be wrongly stated on the records. There was one survivor who was badly burnt and airlifted for treatment.

hslab
hslab@absamail.co.za
2006-07-01 17:47:35
337

Place of death - Dondo (200km South East of Luanda)

hslab
hslab@absamail.co.za
2006-07-01 17:57:56
339

Explosion

Unknown

2002-11-21 17:04:03
342jaco delport was not killed in the border war ,but in a vehecle accident in intellegence school at discobbelos Kimberly during junior leaders course. 83602979 bg lt anthon van der hoven
nvt
2007-07-24 14:27:19
344

If this is Leon, then he died in a shooting accident in training at Oshivelo with the Durban Regiment, I was part of the following section to fire live ammunition at targets pinned in the bushes simulating a contact, the instructors had moved us up not realising Leons section were not yet clear of the area behind, an estimated 200 x R1 rounds were fired at the targets into the bushes behind where ten of our own men were taking cover, surprisingly Leon was the only casualty. I am sorry I never met him as he had only joined our platoon that morning.

  

Duncan Stewart
thestewarts@3i.co.za
2013-01-24 04:56:47
344After demonstrating how the fire and movement range should be used by one of my staff, it was handed over to a DR Regiment Major - who told his Platoon Commanders to "carry on". The range should have been handed over to one officer not to three as when the first section was consolidating, a section from a following platoon opened fire and Delport was shot. I was OC of Oshivelo then and was very upset by the incident. There could have been more casualties. Whoever that Major was - was remiss in his duty as range officer.MS Foster (Capt PF Reserve)
msfoster@mweb.co.za
2013-02-10 13:44:02
344After demonstrating how the fire and movement range should be used by one of my staff, it was handed over to a DR Regiment Major - who told his Platoon Commanders to "carry on". The range should have been handed over to one officer not to three as when the first section was consolidating, a section from a following platoon opened fire and Delport was shot. I was OC of Oshivelo then and was very upset by the incident. There could have been more casualties. Whoever that Major was - was remiss in his duty as range officer.MS Foster (Capt PF Reserve)
msfoster@mweb.co.za
2013-02-10 13:44:21
347

Steve was in the equestrian section. He was a nice guy and we met at 1SAI during basics.

Mark Steel
theplumber@telkomsa.net
2009-12-15 17:52:02
347In 1977, Steve Devereaux died of a self inflicted gunshot wound to the head. He had some personal issues and was affected by the loss of his horse to colic. I never knew him personally as he was the intake after me, however I saw that his interaction with his fellow troops was always jovial. The incident took place in December at Oshigambo. 
Steve suffered the loss of fellow platoon member, Lance Corporal Paul Dossena earlier in the year at Okongo, ( a volunteer from the USA killed in a land mine explosion). In addition,  Lance Corporal Cias Malan, who was with Steve at Okongo,  lost his legs in an ambush near Oshigambo on November 17, 1977.




William Currie
gandaganda80@gmail.com
2013-05-02 14:42:52
349

Killed in an armoured car accident on the road between De Brug training grounds and Bloemfontein.

Unknown
Unknown
2004-09-30 10:44:04
349

Charles and I were friends and were candidate officers at School of Armour in 1976. We were returning from De Brug after a training session when his armoured car (Eland 60) rolled. Charles was killed in the acident.

Always thinking of you Charlie! RIP

Albert van Niekerk
drvanniekerk@aol.com
2011-01-04 20:04:10
351

Rifleman J.H. Diedericks was a member Goudveld Commando. On 6 January 1983 he and a number of others from this unit were on patrol when their vehicle tripped a landmine, killing five of them and injuring the rest. Two of the latter were so badly injured that they succumbed to their injuries the following day.

For details, see entries for B.J. du Toit, F.M. Griessel, P. Uzzel and J.L. van der Merwe.

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2009-11-18 20:59:28
352

Lt Diggle died in an aircraft accident after a partial engine failure. He was acting as co-pilot for Lt Mc Guinness when the attempted forced landing went wrong and the aircraft crashed into trees.



2008-09-06 16:26:26
353

Pierre Digue was a dear friend of mine. To my knowledge, he was based at 1 SAI Bn Tempe and attached to 61 Mech Bn Gp at the time of his death. Pierre died in action during late 1987 in Operation Modular. I wasn't there at the time, but rumour has it that he had volunteered for a task - and that he was killed when his vehicle encountered a Soviet 23 mm AAA gun deployed in a ground role. That was so typical of him. Pierre, we will always remember you.



2002-02-17 18:24:56
353

My name is Andre and Pierre was my twin brother (non-identical). We were born in Grays hospital Pietermaritzburg, Natal the 23rd of February 1962 and lived in Natal for our first 12 years where after we moved to Bloemfontein. We both attended Jim Fouche primary school grade 6 and 7. Pierre then decided to complete his High school years at the High Technical School in Bloemfontein. He was a man‘s man. A real lion amongst the men and had many true friends.

One of his favorite passions in high school was singing in the choir. Pierre was never a great sports lover or I never regarded him as wanting to get physical through sports and that is why his career in the army was such a contrast to how I experienced him in his younger years. Pierre discovered the secret of life long before most of us realise why we are here. And that is to, apart from worshipping the almighty God, to live out your dream, your passion in life. His dream and passion I believe, was to stand up and fight on behalf of many. He was not weak. He fought for the weak. He had some faults like all of us yes, but that did not deter him from fulfilling his destiny.

Pierre had a good relationship with his father. There was a special bond I believe. This investment he received from his father allowed him to be the leader and role model for others, dramatically impacting the lives of many.

Although our interests differed and we thought on different levels, I respect and honour God for who Pierre was. He fought a physical battle that a lot of us have to fight in the spiritual. It is not easy but I believe we are continuously called to fight the good fight on behalf of many, in the same spirit that Pierre did, to stand up and volunteer. Not waiting to be called when conditions are perfect but simply and courageously stating: ‘here I am’.

Andre Digue
Digue@mweb.co.za
2005-12-06 11:14:38
353

Pierre Digue was a permanent force corporal in O Company, 1SAI, Bloemfontein, when I did my basic training there in 1983. He was a tough, uncompromising, at times aggressive, non-com. After basics he was given the drivers' platoon of O Company to whip into shape. I was one of those drivers. He brooked no-nonsense, drove us ceaselessly, did not tolerate slackness and generally gave us a very tough time. Yet we grew to respect him enormously. He was enormously loyal to us and I once saw him assault an entire company who had dared to try and get to our food in the mess. In the end we would have waded through fire to follow him.

In August 1983 he took us to the border to be part of Fighting Group Charlie, which participated in Ops Llama in Angola. Here we learnt a different side of him. He was a funny, caring, intelligent person, a good friend, a fine soldier.

He was with us in Fighting Group Delta when we took part in Ops Askari.

I last saw him at 1 SAI. He was sitting in the driver's seat of a tractor. It was weeks before my national service ended. We had a very candid conversation. I tried to convince him to leave the army, feeling that he could make a success of any career he chose. But the army was in his blood.

I phoned him at his home in Bellville, if I remember correctly. It was New Year's Day, 1986. He sounded genuinely pleased to hear from me. 

Looking back, I can honestly say that I'd learnt more about leadership from Pierre Digue and my platoon sergeant during basics, corporal "Bere" van den Bergh. He could not stand kow-towers and was always fair.

I will always remember him with great affection and enormous respect.

Gustav "Prof" Venter
gustavventer@gmail.com
2009-02-22 23:07:08
353

25 Years on..... the driver's platoon will be having a reunion in Bloemfontein 17/18 October 2009 and hope all that reads this info could possibly pass on this important information so that we can also toast to our beloved corporal. Paul Stone,(082 9310272) Clint Mann, (082-854444).Charlie Dunston and Prof Venter (0836906257).

CLINT MANN
albauto@mweb.co.za
2009-08-01 15:20:30
353

Hein Lorenzen and I were together on JL?s. I clearly remember Sgt. PJ Digue for two reasons. The first is I do not recall him ever wearing a jersey or bush jacket even on those cold winter mornings at MLW or ?Die Brug?. Always in an immaculate short sleeve ?Browns? shirt boldly displaying the three stripes on both arms. Secondly during Platoon commanders course, special weapons training Sgt. PJ Digue singled me our as the ?Engelsman? being one of about four English JL?s, I remember him saying it in a funny yet compassionate way. I would have followed him to hell and back had he asked. Unfortunately before we could be deployed the bad news reached us.

Steven Mavromatis (Engelsman)

Mavro
steven@gilstan.com
2010-09-26 14:36:43
353Pierre, it is 23 years today, Rest in peace my friend you are still in my thoughts. Carl Lategan
Carl.lategan@sappi.com
2010-11-09 20:09:01
353

Sergeant Dique was killed in action on 9 November 1987 by FAPLA's 16th Brigade, a battle in which I also participated.  According to stories at the time he was sitting in the tailgunner's position on a Ratel 20. A mortar shell landed on the Ratel and he was hit in the head by shrapnel that came in under his headset. Stories at the time had it that he ilved for sometime and had medical attention and a blood transfusion, but died shortly afterwards.  Like I said these were battlefield rumours and stories told at the time. Lance Corporal P. F. Botha 84413681BG 4 SAI, A Company , Platoon 3

PF Botha
bothapf@ananzi.co.za
2012-01-24 07:35:00
353 PIERRE AND I SERVED IN 1SAI IN BLOEM HE WAS MY CORP IN 1982 WE SERVED TOGETHER HE WAS NEVER COLD DAY OR NIGHT HOW COLD HE NEVER WORE A JACKET PIERRE BLESS YOU BROTHER WHEN I CLARED OUT HE BECAME PF AND MADE SERGANT ITS A PITTY HE PASSED ON BECAUSE PIERRE WAS A GOOD PERSON ALLTHOUGH HE GAVE ME A NICK NAME WHICH SOOTED ME WELL REST IN PEACE BROTHER THANK YOU FOR TEACHING ME THE RIGHT WAY HILTON HISCOCK
hilton.hiscock@gmail.com
2013-06-07 03:16:56
353I am Pierre???s older brother by 13 months, Johann. I am writing this on the eve of the 28th anniversary of Pierre???s death deep in the Angolan bush. Memories of Pierre came flooding, memories of a caring, strong-willed, determined, and loving person who was always ready to help others, no questions asked. I had the opportunity to join Operation Hooper in January 1988, an Operation planned to relieve Operation Modular of which Pierre formed part of as a member of 4 SAI. Our unit, on our way to Cuito Cuanavale, passed his unit in Angola where I met with Pierre???s commander. Sitting under a tree in the veld he relayed the circumstances surrounding Pierre???s death. According to him it was Pierre???s day off but he insisted in forming part of the operation planned for the day, an operation to halt the advance of the FAPLA 16th Brigade. He was given the anti-aircraft position at the back of the Ratel to observe the battle. The SADF lost 7 killed and 9 wounded on the day, Pierre died approximately 9h10 due to AA fire. I will never forget ??? In loving memory, jou ouboet. Johann Digue
johann.digue@gmail.com
2015-11-08 11:57:01
355

Killed in a Contact

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2002-11-25 08:36:10
357

Alan Dixon was a friend of mine in 101 Transport Company, based in Grootfontein. He was driving a Magirus Deutz one night, loaded with supplies for 32 Bn at Nkurenkuru (sp.), when a front tire blew and the vehicle rolled and crushed him.

For those who were there, and are
For those who were there, and are not
But most of all, for those who were there

 

Jim J.

Jim J.

2001-11-23 06:44:54
357Alan was my dearly beloved brother and this is the first time in 34 years I have known what happened to him.  Thank you Jim JSharon Firmin
northamptonshirelmc@msn.com
2012-07-06 09:21:11
358Lt Dixon passed away when the Buffel vehicle they were travelling in overturned.
He was part of the Kaffrarian Rifles unit in East London.
Frans Botha
frans@crinum.co.za
2013-01-18 01:00:15
358Michael Nixon (not Dixon) was a member of the KRs and was killed in a Buffel accident on 17 May 1993Andrew Whitaker
whitbr@iafrica.com
2015-01-15 00:01:44
358Surname should read Nixon and not Dixon. Frans Botha
Not disclosed
2013-02-15 04:48:45
363Paul was killed when he rolled a Unimog after hitting a land mine in the vicinity of Okongo, Ovamboland. Paul was a volunteer from the U.S.A. He was a good person and was well liked by everyone in the unit. Will Currie
gandaganda80@gmail.com
2013-04-29 14:46:17
365This young officer wasnot killed on the border but was killed during the 1987 floods of natal where he formed part of a crew that were formed to save lives of civilians. during these rescues the rivers banks broke and a wave of rubble overturned his boat and he was lost and subsequently drowned.

2002-05-14 02:39:14
367My brother was navigator aboard a Canberra bomber. The plane was shot down a short distance inside Angola and crashed killing both pilot Wally Maira's and my brother Owen Doyle. They were on a bombing mission and left 12 Squadron on the evening of 14th or 15th March 1979 at about 17H00. Five Canberra's flew in formation and while doing a low level tree top flight and dropping bombs something from the ground fired and hit the Canberra on the side killing the pilot instantly, my brother flew the plane from the navigators position for about 12 minutes with bomb bay doors open till the plane went straight down into the ground. We are proud of you God Bless Colin Doyle

2001-12-31 16:17:45
367Owen was 21 years old when he died, he was a member of 12 Squadron and was flying in a Canberra bomber aircraft. Full names Owen John Doyle. Born 6 July 1957.Trevor Doyle
tdoyle@oldmutualpfa.com
2008-02-08 20:02:24
368John and myself were good buddies from basics in 1980 onward. I missed out on the 3rd Border trip because I came back late from pass, so spent 3 months at Upington doing arbitrary stuff. Heard the news of his and Bruce Whites death at base, was devastated at the loss. RIP Brothers. Terrence W
tericom@telkomsa.net
2016-11-28 09:40:33
371

Pierre was killed in action in SWA, on 12 August 1978, whilst in hot pursuit of a terrorist group of about 45 men strong. He died together with two other paratroopers, Hannes Greyling and Corrie vd Nest. Pierre was walking at almost point when he took the shots.

He was a jovial, strong man, with exceptional vasbyt!

"Come and stand by your glass and be ready,
here is a toast to the men of the skies,
here is a toast to the one dead already
and a toast to the next one to die..."

Dave
daveh@intekom.co.za
2008-12-11 07:46:59
371I remember this as if it was yesterday. I was a medic, 19 years old, at the Ondangwa Air Base that day, and we tried so hard ...Hein Erasmus
heinerasmus@xtra.co.nz
2010-09-25 12:19:32
377

21 Sep 1978: 73427494BG Rifleman JC Du Plessis from 11 Commando Regiment was critically wounded in a shooting incident at Etale Base. He later succumbed to his wounds in 1 Military Hospital. He was 21.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-21 12:45:46
380

28 Sep 1984: 78444866PE Corporal Petrus Johannes Du Plessis from 1 Special Service Battalion died after being grievously burned when a petrol stove accidentally exploded at Oshakati while the armoured vehicles were in a laager. . He was 22.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-28 00:32:51
382

Died in a freak accident. Drowned

Ralph McLean
ralph@southafricawargraves.org
2009-07-09 19:54:10
383The story of a surfboard lost in a fire..... Nothing much can be said...the only people who would have ever held that board in their hands and known the sentimental value would have been my uncle Glenn who died on the border for 'South Africa', my brother, myself, my mother, her brother and sister, and you Hayden. Not even Shaun Tomson would have comprehended fully what lay behind those sprayed Wedge colours originating from Glenns design all those years ago in Warner Beach. I'm gutted Hayden. if it was anywhere, there was only one place other than with us it should go, back to my uncle...RIP Glenn du Plooy, killed in action far from his beloved Baggies Beach Brett Morison
bmorison@gmail.com
2010-02-20 11:57:56
383Glen lost his life serving as a driver with HQ Company, 5SAI. A guy with a cheerful and wicked sense of humour he kept many of his buddies sane during difficult times. He lost is life along with 2 troops from 701 Battlion near Enhana Base. He survived a rifle grenade attack on his vehicle on the Wednesday prior to the fateful Saturday in May 1982. Just a few weeks before we returned to South Africa. We miss you buddy. Peter van Wijk
petevwijk@gmail.com
2011-03-31 15:28:14
386

I knew Jacques du Preez as a gentle, thoughtful person when we were in school together. Apparently he was teaching local children in South West Africa and one night his bungalow was hit by a mortar.

Unknown

2001-07-06 16:14:50
386Jacques Samuae Dupreez died during an attack on the school he was teaching at west of Rundu in the then South West Africa. He was 19 year old when he died on the 4th May 1982. He was Rifleman in 1 Intellegence Corps. The flash is an emflamed sword and he wore a black beret with a Bat-eared fox head (Jakkalskop).
The same night the police base at Nkurenkuru, the military base 1km from the school and the school at Tondoro was attacked. Only the teachers quarters were affected at the school, specifically the house where Jacques and 4 other National Servicemen were housed as teachers and the Principal's house next door.
Jacques died when a hand grenade landed on him some time after midnight of the 4 May 1982.
Christian Goosen
goosen@secunda.co.za
2011-05-01 19:41:03
386Jacques Du Preez' name appears on the memorial plinth at 1 Tactical Intelligence Regiment HQ in Pothefstroom (previously erected in Kimberley).Christian Goosen
goosen@secunda.co.za
2011-05-02 21:18:18
388

Listed on Klapperkop wall as "* G. H. Du RAND"

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-28 09:41:48
388

During Operation Dolfyn, on 1 July 1983 the third platoon of Alpha Company, 32 Battalion, were waiting to be joined by the first platoon at a TB between Dova and Nehone in Angola. When the guards spotted uniformed men approaching the TB, they assumed them to be the first platoon, but they were in fact a group of some 50 SWAPO insurgents, who proceeded to open fire on the third platoon. Still believing that they were under friendly fire, the third platoon scattered into the bush, carrying only their personal weapons, and did not open fire on the SWAPO group as they believed they would be causing friendly casualties. Once they realised their mistake, it was too late to carry out an effective counter-attack with only light weapons and SWAPO was able to loot the TB before making off. The third platoon suffered two fatal casualties, Sergeant G.H. du Randt and Rifleman E. Cassera, whilst 2nd Lieutenant G.W. Roos, Corporal P.G. Grobler and two more riflemen were wounded in the fire fight.

Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje. 

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-09 08:41:24
388The facts described above, although catching, is not in all totally correct.

I will be launching a new publication soon, Striking inside Angola with 32 Battalion.

There the incident is properly described.

For more information about the incident, contact me please at 082 569 4198

Marius Scheepers
mariusscheepers@irodo.com
2011-06-14 15:53:41
388The facts described above, although catching, is not in all totally correct.

I will be launching a new publication soon, Striking inside Angola with 32 Battalion.

There the incident is properly described.

For more information about the incident, contact me please at 082 569 4198

Marius Scheepers
mariusscheepers@irodo.com
2011-06-14 15:54:06
389Cmdt Du Randt was the commander of four field regiment in Potch, on Duty in Ops modular in Angola, Early one evening Cmdt Du Randt was flying around in a Bosbok spotter plane giving our battery targeting information on the enemy when the Angolan brigades started shooting at the plane with SAM missiles guns etc. the plane was hit and crashed in a near by Field where the Pilot and Cmdt Du Randt died.

2002-08-06 09:20:09
390

Sktr du Toit was lid van die Goudveld Kommando. Op 6 Januarie 1983 is hy en ses ander lede van die Goudveld Kommando op n roetiene patrollie toe hul voertuig n landmyn in die Kaokoveld, in die Noord-Westelike operasionele gebied, aftrap. Sktr du Toit en vyf van sy makkers is op slag oorlede, nog twee sou die volgende dag aan hul wonde beswyk.



2001-07-19 23:03:06
391Charles du Toit was killed in an accident at Bandelierskop near Louis Trichardt in 1968 when he was 21 years old. His parents (Faan and Helen) were family friends - I was 12 at the time, so the memory is somewhat limited. His grave should be somewhere on the East Rand where his father was either mine manager or inspector of mines at the time. He was engaged to Mari? (I think) at the time and drove a Triumph Spitfire. As far as I know it was an accident in training when the wing of his aircraft touched or was touched by another and the craft went out of control and fell.Andr? Basson
andreb@esscubed.co.za
2007-05-11 13:37:48
391'The aircraft was doing a 1v1 exercise above cloud and while trying to outmanoeuvre the aircraft on his tail entered cloud with lots of bank on and did not recover. The other aircraft recovered to level visual flight and called Charles to recover without any response. Charles hit the ground after exiting the low cloud base in a steep nose down attitude near Bandelierskop'. (Courtesy of Graham Rochat)Johan Meyer
tazzrat@gmail.com
2009-06-23 12:43:29
395

Rfn E.P. du Toit was killed in an explosives accident with Rfn R.G. Dunn on the SWA Border, Koakoveld

Unknown

2004-02-22 21:50:16
395

Rfn E.P. du Toit was killed in an explosives accident- SWA Border Koakoveld.

4 SAI Assault Pioneer- Middelburg

Unknown

2006-06-16 00:41:20
395

I was in the same platoon with Evert du Toit and Robert Dunn and I remember the incident well. The accident actually happened in Sector 20, Rundu area.

Gerald Alberts
gerald.alberts@neotel.co.za
2009-04-15 15:14:04
399

"I was making comms at last light when I received a flash message to stand by for a signal in code. I got the code book out and recorded the letters and figures but as I deciphered it tears started to well up in my eyes. It read simply: 'Sunray call sign one is dead.'

Our sister group had been lying up at midday when an X Company of some 100 FRELIMO Regulars had followed them. The sentry had spotted their lead scouts and detonated the defence claymores. Kocky marshalled his forces for a sweep through the contact area. An undetected, wounded man shot and killed him as he led his men forward. The group had then come under sustained close-range fire but had fought their way out using mini-claymores to give themselves some breathing space. The loss of Kocky was a hammer blow.

He was liked and respected; his humour; and love of life had touched each of us. He was the best officer I'd served with in any army."

Harry McCallion
SK
sknight26@hotmail.com
2007-07-24 08:08:39
400

Killed in a Contact

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2002-11-25 09:03:53
400

Viljoen du Toit, O/Kpl Medic, 201 Bn, Golf Kompanie, Pel 3.

Sterf in kontak Oos van Kunene rivier wes van Cuamato

Angola April 1988.

Die kontak het plaas gevind tussen SWA Gebiedsmag Romeo Mike (reaksie mag) (wat die gebied gedomineer en skoon gehou het van SWAPO terroriste) en Angolese/Kubaanse magte. 'n Paar Boesmans sterf ook in die kontak en baie ander lede is gewond en "ge-casevac".

Viljoen kon nie na die kontak opgespoor word nie (asook ander lede van die pelaton). Sommige het eers na dag drie in SWA aangekom.

Viljoen se liggaam is later deur verkennings elemente in 'n "vlakgraf" weg van die kontak toneel gevind. Hy was definatief in die kontak gewond en is deur die terroriste weg gevoer.

'n Baie netjiese en deeglikke jongman het sy lewe verloor wat ek sien as die draaipunt van die "bosoorlog" na 'n "semi-konvensionele" oorlog teen die Kubaans/Russies/Oos Duitse/Angolese beskermhere van die Swapo terroris bendes.

Viljoen en almal wat hul lewe gelaat het word gesallueer.

"Die stryd is nie teen die vlees nie maar teen die gees wat nie vernietig kan word nie".

Ek was sy Kompanie Bevelvoerder

Johan Duvenage
duv_sec@global.co.za
2007-11-17 06:48:38
400

Some more details on my Son, Pieter Gerhardus Viljoen Du Toit.

  • Surname: Du Toit
  • Initials: P. G. V.
  • Rank: L/Cpl
  • Date: 18 Apr 1988
  • Corps: SAMS, (not SA Army)
  • Awards: Pro Patria and Southern African Medal (Posthumous)
  • Year: 1988
  • Place: Near Chipeque, 30 km SE from Xangongo, Angola.
  • Date of Birth: 29 Dec 1968
  • Full names: Pieter Gerhardus Viljoen
  • Military number: 84379122 BG
  • Death age: 19 Yrs
  • Unit: Sector 20, 31 Bn, Omega Sickbay, Ops Medic
  • War: Border SWA / Angola
  • Buried on 8 June 1988 at Centurion Cemetery, Hero Acre.
MS and Marienne du Toit
msdt@yebo.co.za
2009-06-11 15:07:52
400 Fires(Johan) v Vuren
johan@jonkmanspruit.co.za
2012-12-30 11:12:51
404

On 21 February 1985 a 32 Battalion patrol from Echo Company were preparing to set an ambush some 30 kilometres east of Cassinga in Angola, when they spotted the tracks left by six men just north of their TB. These six men were then sighted approaching the TB from the east, and sixteen 32 Battalion soldiers went out to intercept them. Hardly had they done so when a heavy and accurate mortar barrage began falling onto their TB and the company prepared to withdraw southwards.

Before they could do so, a further 70 enemy soldiers surrounded the TB from the east, west and south, forcing Echo Company to withdraw northwards under fire. In the ensuing firefight, Lance Corporal L. Dumba was killed and Rifleman B. Paulo was wounded and captured by the enemy soldiers, whilst the latter also captured all of Echo Company's equipment.   

Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2011-01-11 12:41:28
407

Rfn R.G. Dunn (4 SAI) was killed in an explosives accident with Rfn E.P. Du Toit (4 SAI) in SWA Border Koakoveld

Unknown

2004-02-22 21:51:43
409Theuns baby girl was born on 22 April 1988.  She was named after her father - Antonia. Her first born is on the way and the suspected dat is 17 December 2012. Elme van Aardt
maintenance@medihelp.co.za
2012-06-04 04:22:33
409On 11 November 1987 the leading elements of Combat Group Bravo (4SAI) came under small-arms fire during the afternoon during their attack on FAPLA. The order was given for all troops to step out of the Ratels and start with forward attacks. Theuns Duvenhage was the section leader. A mortar exploded next to Theuns and Theuns was struck by shrapnel from this mortar, He died seconds later from this injury. Theuns was just married and his wife was 4 months pregnant with their first baby boy. Andries Groenewald
blgroenewald@mweb.co.za
2009-10-23 12:03:16
409Cpl Duvenhage was KIA on 9 November 1987 not 11 November 1987. He died in combat against FAPLA 16 BrigadeP F Botha
drpfbotha45@gmail.com
2016-10-31 06:03:16
411Lt M J Earp (son of the later Chief of the Air Force, Lt Genl D J Earp), was the co-pilot of a Puma shot down whilst doing trooping in Southern-Angola on 5 January 1982. The pilot, Capt J Robinson, flight engineer Sgt K Dalgleish and 13 soldiers died in the crash.

2003-05-31 11:07:28
413

Richard Ede was our brother and died at the Angolan border on 06 January 1983 at the age of 27. He was survived by his wife Annie and his two sons, Richard and Charles as well as his four siblings and parents. His death came as a great shock to all especially as the government at the time denied the fact that our boys were in Angola at all. I pray every day that his death was not meaningless and that he did not die in vain. We still love and miss you everyday Richard, your ever loving siblings Glynis, Lesley, Thelma and Clive

Ede Family
lesleyf@wilddogpress.co.za
2007-02-19 15:09:06
418

16 Sep 1988: 83435180BG Rifleman Sean Cochrane Ellis from 61 Mechanised Battalion Group was killed in a Military Vehicle Accident between Ogongo and Okalongo. He was 21.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-16 06:00:29
419Ek was saam met Kimberley Kommando op Mapacha vanaf Desember 1977 tot Februarie 1978. Ons was al so te se op pad huis toe, het al klaar ons persoonlike ammunisie terug gehandig toe die insident plaas gevind het. Ons het op daardie stadium gehoor dit was twee Lugmag Kolonelle en 2 siwie ingenieurs wat in die hinderlaag betrokke was. Die persoon wat oorleef het, het deur die bosse gevlug en is vroeg oggend deur die wagte by Echo bunker ( die bunker reg langs die Katima pad ) gesien en is in die basis ingehelp. Ons het die volgende dag opvolg operasies onder bevel van Kmdt A.K. de Jager, bevelvoerder van 13 Sub area, gehad maar daar was nie te veel sukses hieruit gewees nie. Na al die jare weet ek nou vir die eerste keer dat die gesneuwelde Lugmag personeel Kmdt Poole en Maj Els was.Nick de Beer
nickdb@mweb.co.za
2011-06-02 08:18:47
421I was a Tiffy posted with C squadron during the Swapo breech of Resolution 435. We were out patroling looking for Swapo. I did not realy know much of what was happening as I was sitting in the back of a Ratel. We hit a contact, there was a lot of shooting especially from Koevoet. I heard later that Lt Chris Els had been shot & was taken to Ondangwa or Oshikati. The next mornig we were told he was dead. I knew him from a few months previously when we were up at Ruacana. There was some clearing of mines from around the camps. While camped in the bush for a few days he used to come over & chat with the guys. We even played a game of volley ball. I was a bit scared of him as he seemed a no nonsense bloke. Besides he was a Lieutenant & I was just a private so I kept my distance. I believe he was engaged at the time of his death.

2002-04-05 17:23:09
421The incident happened on the 3rd of April 1989. I was an acting Pl Cmdr of B Comp Pl 3 - 61 Mg Bn Gp. We picked up "spoors" early the morning and made contact later that afternoon. I remember Lt. Chris as first class officer who was always prepare to help. Willie Cloete
willie.cloete@samancorcr.com
2006-11-13 11:41:46
421Ek was gestationeer op Ondangwa tydens die April inval. Ek was die onderofisier aan diens to Lt Els ingekom het, dit was vir my 'n besondere tragiese geval en het my diep geraak. Wat aan ons gese is was dat Lt Els in die turret van sy Ratel was toe hulle 'n kontak geslaan het. Die gunner in die kar agter hom het begin skiet sonder om sy wapen te swaai en so Lt Els geskiet. Ek wil nie graag uitbrei oor sy wond nie maar weet dat hy opslag dood was, al was daar nog hipotelamis aktiwiteit oor die volgende paar ure. Toe ek die Lt gecheck het vir identiteit het ek sy beursie in sy oorpak gekry met sy geld in en 'n foto van hom en sy meisie/verloofde, as ek reg onthou was dit 'n blonde meisie en die twee van hulle het in mekaar se arms gestaan in 'n mooi tuin. Dit het my baie diep geraak want dit het dit soveel persoonliker gemaak. Die Bev het besluit om eerder tot oggend toe te wag om sy ours in kennis te stel want daar was geen sin om hulle so vroeg in die oggend wakker te bel met die slegte nuus nie.  Danie Coetzee
Danie@DeoVolenteIT.co.nz
2011-12-26 14:52:17
421Ek was die gunship helikopter vlieenier wat hom opgelaai het, die kontak was baie deurmekaar en 'n baie tragiese geval. Alhoewel  hy tekens van lewe getoon het was hy nie by sy bewussyn nie. Heeltemal n sinnelose lewensverlies. Rus in vrede Chris.Kobus Swart
kswart@flighttrainingadelaide.com
2012-07-29 08:32:17
421Ek en Chris was saam luitenante by 1SDB , hy kortdiens en ek staandemag. Met die 1 April 89 Swapo inval het ons spore opgevolg saam Koevoet ,op die 3de April het ons die middag kontak met die vyand gehad ,hewige vuur deur Caspirs en Ratel 90. Chris was in sy ratel se toring, toe hy getref was, daar was so hewige skietery dat dit moeilik is om te se wie se vuur  hom getref het . Sy drywer het net oor die radio geskreeu hy is raakgeskiet en het op sy stoel ineen gesak. Ek het die casavac berig deurgestuur Oshakati toe ,ons was op daardie staduim  by Umgulumbashe. .Die chopper was baie gou op die toneel met  mediese hulp, Chris het nog geleef toe hulle daar weg is.Dink gereeld nog aan die gebeure van daardie dag, Chris was n dapper soldaat. Rus in Vrede 

Riaan Engelbrecht
engelbrechtr@live.co.za
2012-11-20 05:02:38
421Die voorval wat gebeur het sal my die res van my lewe by bly, ek was maar 19 en nog n kind, alhoewel ons goeie opleiding gekry gedurnde ons "training" maak dit jou nie reg vir lewens veliese nie. Ek was n Ops Medic in Bravo Kompanie wat saam met the ratel 90`s in die kontak was, dis waar - dit was n hengse geskietery.... die volgende oomblik word daar op my geskree van die peleton bevelvoerder af "Medic - Medic" toe vlieg die ratel se deur oop en die 2de in Bevel van die brigade skree op my ek moet kom help. Toe ek myself kry was ek bo op die ratel 90 saam die bevelvoerder en het Luitenant Els aan sy panseroorpak uit die ratel se "turret" waar hy tot by die drywer in gesak het uitgetrek en hom tot op die grond gebring waar ek eers kon sien hy is in die kop getref die "gunship" helicopter met "medics" het hom van daar op die draagbaar wegevoer. Toe ek later terug is in my Ratel het die skok eers deergekom ek het begin bewe en gebid vir hom want hy was nog daar.....En ons kon ook geskiet gewees het. Ek hoop om sy familie eendag te ontmoet - 079 318 3046. God Bless Lauri Bezuidenhout 61 Mech Bravo Kompanie peleton 3 1989
bezuidl@eskom.co.za
2016-10-18 06:43:46
422Pletoon 18, Viking Company, Marines

2007-08-05 19:48:19
423

Donald was killed in Katima Mulilo in the SWAPO mortar attack on the 23 Aug 1978. A shell pierced the roof of a bungalow killing 10 and wounding a number. I was in the mortars of 3SAI and we were stationed outside the camp in which they were killed. He was a great guy and a great soccer player which is where I got to Know him.

He was from the Roodepoort area.

Neil Smith
smiths@usa.net
2007-08-02 01:11:50
423

The unit Dennis Elworthy was in was 2SSB (2nd Special Services Battalion -Zeerust). He was killed at Katima Mulilu in the Caprivi strip SWA in 1978, by a red-eye attack from Shesheke.

He was my best friend. I was shot later on and was unable to attend his funeral.

Brian Dale
Brian.Dale@debeersgroup.com
2007-08-27 15:53:26
423

My name is Deon Erasmus, 5 years after the bombing myself and 4 friends were instructed to demolish the bungalow. What I saw that day when we opened the bungalow doors is still fresh in my memory today. I was from 5 M.W.E.

Deon
goldreef.specialists@gmail.com
2009-01-01 21:47:30
423

My name is Barry Callaghan I was in the attack that night in 1 SSB. Still have bad memories of that horrible night.

I was a gunner in 1 SSB and we had just arrived to take over.

Barry Callaghan
barryc@shereno.co.za
2009-05-04 11:56:34
423My name is Chris Crossley. Dennis Elworthy was actually with 1SSB in the 1978 January intake. He was in B Squadron for operational duty and was posted to Katima Mulilo in July 1978. The attack was from Sesheke where Swapo launched "Red Eye" rockets, one of which made a direct hit on the bungalow where the armoured troop were billited. Ten of the 12 members of the troop were killed in this incident. I was at Ruacana airfield at the time in Troop 1 of A Squadron when we heard about the attack. The crew commanders and guuners of this troop all did gunnery phase with me. In early April1979, I was posted with Troop 1 of A Squadron 2SSB to Mapacha in the Caprivi some 20kms from Katima.

It was an absolute shock to us to hear of the attack and the loss of so many of our comrades in arms. I still remember them to this day. They were fine soldiers. "We will remember them"
Chris Crossley
crossleys@xtra.co.nz
2010-06-25 14:32:10
423My name is Chris Crossley. Dennis Elworthy was actually with 1SSB in the 1978 January intake. He was in B Squadron for operational duty and was posted to Katima Mulilo in July 1978. The attack was from Sesheke where Swapo launched "Red Eye" rockets, one of which made a direct hit on the bungalow where the armoured troop were billeted. Ten of the 12 members of the troop were killed in this incident, and Dennis was one of them. I was stationed at Ruacana Airfield (51 Btn) at the time, in Troop 1 of A Squadron when we heard about the attack. The crew commanders and guuners of this troop all did gunnery phase with me. In early April1979, I was posted with Troop 1 of A Squadron 2SSB to Mapacha in the Caprivi some 20kms from Katima.

It was an absolute shock to us to hear of the attack and the loss of so many of our comrades in arms. I still remember them to this day. They were fine soldiers. "We will remember them"
Chris Crossley
crossleys@xtra.co.nz
2010-06-25 14:35:24
423My name is Chris Boshoff.I was based at Wenela the time of the attack. I was on guard duty that night. The attack happenen at about 1:00 in the morning. I saw the "red eyes" in the sky(a long red stripes). All the rockets and mortars missed our baseChris
chboshoff@anglogoldashanti.com
2010-12-29 21:04:04
423

My name is Bobby Thomson. I was in Katima Mulilo that night. I was a gunner and served at the mortar locating radar (32 Loc Battery)which was situated on a tower next to the heli pad. The second red eye landed between us and the helipad . We then directed fire onto pre-listed targets along the river and in Sesheke and the guns at golf wiped out all their long and medium range weapons within the first 10 - 15 minutes after the attack. I remeber that we were in a direct line between Golf firebase and some of the targets in Zambia. We would see the firing of the guns, then hear the shells come overhead and her the explosions when they landed. Lt Schalekamp gave mopping-up fire orders the next day. The next day we went to look at the bungalow and what we saw remained with me for many a year after that.

Bobby Thomson
warringtons@eccsystems.co.za
2011-02-26 09:25:10
423My name is Erich. I was based at golf, as part of an engineering troop, building the new golf base, as well as being part of the specialsed mine team. The retaliation fire came from our base. The 5,5 cannons shot the hell out of Swapo that night. No red eye landed very close to our base. We had to protect the guns whilst the gunners were doing their stint. They wiped out their targets time and again.Well done to the gunners and Martin Schalenkamp as the Op officer sitting on the water tower that night. 
went into the main Katima base the morning and saw  the bungalow that was hit. It was a sight that I will never forget.
we will remember them
erich
erichvan@gmail.com
2011-03-01 19:34:47
423

My name is Okkie Vosloo. I served with Dennis during that particular time. He was a great soccer player and a very pleasant chap.  The date of 23 August 1978 will forever be in my mind, as this was the day I lost good friends and also because it was my 21st birthday. Hi "Bob Dylan" = Brian Dale, Paul Scully, Jorrie Jordaan and all my mates
Dennis RIP

Okkie Vosloo
okivosloo@yahoo.com
2011-03-02 21:54:37
423My naam is Bertie Visser. Ek was op patrollie,3SAI peleton 4, seksie 3 op die kaplyn ongeveer 5 km weg van Wenela. Swapo het die nag n 122mm vuurpyl oorkant ons posisie in Zambie afgelaai van waar hulle om middernag begin het om teikens in die Caprivi te bestook. Ons was amper in die terug vuur deur die 5.5,s raakgeskiet. Ek onthou nog die vreesaanjaende geluid van die 122mm vuurpyle wat oor ons afgevuur was. Bertie Visser
Bertie.Visser@gmail.com
2011-04-14 22:06:29
423It was a night that will long linger in ones memory."goofy" The Late D Elsworthy was a great fellow as was those who fell around him on that fateful night. God bless their souls and families who sacrificed all .
Soccer was not the same after those who "fell"
"swazi"
mvvz@mweb.co.za
2011-05-01 14:05:12
423My name is Johan van Loggerenberg. I was one off the permanently based poeple in the SAW . i was sleeping in the bugalo that was destroyed.the medic that slept next to me ( Biggs ) was killed that night. I was in the OPS room and it saved my life. The only guy i car remember that passed that night was Erasmus , we met in the mess hours before his death. I am 52 now and still think about this tragic event . Johan van Loggerenberg
johanvl@anglocoal.co.za
2011-06-29 08:21:10
423

my name is eric robinson and i was also with 3 sai based at wenela on the night katima was hit. it was our last night of a patrol when we were ordered to walk to the golf base to lend support to the gunners. it was a spectacular sight seeing these huge plumes of fire coming from the G5 cannons, the whole place was one heat wave. it was an experience i shall never forget. 

ERIC ROBINSON
erobinson@emperorspalace.com
2011-11-20 07:50:51
423 I came across this website and was shocked to hear about what happened at Wenela base in 1978.I did my first border stint there during January and April 1977,I was 25 at the time and part of Wynberg Commando Regiment based in Cape Town.I think we did our refresher training at Katimo Mulilo,it was very tough and the training was carried out by Lt. Hudson,I think he was permanent force and a mean bastard,I think they called him "Shu Shu".I remember we did patrols,4 days out and 4 days in and when back at base we stood gaurd duty.The patrols were not very pleasant,boiling during the day and then rain at night,we got wet most nights,fortunately we were lucky and did not encounter any problems,only enemy was the snakes,spiders,elephants,etc. Later I became part of the reaction force and was based at an airport nearby,cant remember the name.To hear that this base was hit with such a loss is a shock and only a year after we were there.Had a look at the shot of the camp with the bungalows,which I remember well,god it was hot in those bungalows during the day.My heart goes out to all those guys who perished in 78.I did 2 more stints,in 79 Rundu,and 82 Ondangwa airbase,both of which were very quiet I am glad to say.I feel as a commando unit we were purposely sent to quiet areas,although we were always told otherwise,for obvious reasons.I would say the greatest thing about border duty was that plane trip home after 3 months.Rob Moffat
rbmfft@ntlworld.com
2011-12-18 07:05:18
423My name is Marlize (Botha) Visagie.  I was in that attack that night, I was 9 years old and we lived in Katima for 3 years.  My dad was stationed in Katima Mullilo and me, my mom and sister were sitting it out in our bunker in front of our house.  13 long hours of listening to it all.  My dad (Major Dick Botha) had to go into the Military Base for the duration of the attack, as all military personnel were ordered to do.  He saw what happened with those troops, and years afterwards still talked about it with tears in his eyes.  But as far as I can remember, they were all ordered to sleep in the trenches/ bunkers for more than a week prior to the attack.  I guess they were tired of doing so and decided to take a chance that night ...  Really sad.  I would love to make contact with anyone that was part of it or knew my dad.Marlize Visagie
visagie.marlize@yahoo.com
2012-02-01 03:15:28
423

Hi my naam is 'Baldraad' en was saam met Dennis van 2 SDB Zeerust. Dit was ons laaste aand op die grens en ons sou die volgende more terug vlieg.Ek was daai aand op Wanela, so 8 km van Katima. Een troep was op Katima en een op Wenela. Hy was die enigste een van 2 SDB wat gesterf het. Die ander was omtrent almal van 1SDB- Bloemfontein.(Hul eerste aand op die grens)

Hy was n ' great' engelsman en was mal oor sokker. Saam gesweet op Zeerust en saam gelag in die 'pub'. Ek is besig om n storie oor daai 5 dae te skryf soos ek dit beleef het en het toe op die website afgekom.

He was an amazing guy.

 

Riaan Claase
claaseriaan@yahoo.com
2012-06-28 19:01:13
423I am Willie Els. I was part of the Armoured car troup stationed at Wenela that night. Goofy was with me as part of the Squadron fro 2 SSB from Zeerust,we were suppose to fly back home the morning of 23rd August. That night is engraved in my memory for ever...i was present when Brian Dale were shot in Field Unit Morning Star during follow up operatons in Zambia.... We few...we happy few...we band of brothers...for he that shed his blood for me today shall be my brother....ek sal julle mooit vergeet nie boys....Willie Els
willie@erdfab.co.za
2015-02-19 04:58:00
423Ek is Johan Swiegers my bynaam was weerman Doppies( onthou julle die spotprent op die agterblad van Paratus  )
Ek was saam met die artilerie op Golf die nag van die aanval .Ek en Theuns de Bruin van Askam het saam in een banker geslaap. Dit was so kwart voor een die nag toe die eerste Rooi oog ander kant ons geval het .Dit was chaos vir die eerste 10 minute ,gelukkig het ons gou die kanonne gereed gekry en ons eerste bestoking was 10 skote per kannon maw. 80 projektiele Daarna het ons aanhou skiet tot 7uur die volgende oggend .Ek was gelukkig om n opname van die aanval op tape te kry by ons O.P lt.Wessie .Ek het Luit.Kol Constant Viljoen op Lughawe by Mpatcha gaan haal en hom gaan wys waar die rooi oog projektiele geval het .Ja ek was by die bungelo waar die 10 ouens geslaap het dit wil ek nooit weer sien nie . Ek sal graag van die ander gunners wil hoor 
Johan
johanswiegers@xtremeisp.co.za
2013-02-16 12:31:11
423

My name is Hennie Bosman. Was stationed in Katima the night the attack took place. Rude awakaning about 1am in the morning with shells expoding around us. We were right next to the Heli Pad. 4 ops with our Radar set. What a night and proud of our mates the gunners that wiped out the enemy.
later that day we only then realized that one of the bungalows were hit and that sight will always be on my mind.

Hennie Bosman
henniebosman2@gmail.com
2013-06-14 04:28:13
423 I remember it distinctly. The run-up to the attack was as follows: After the successful operation Reindeer and the battle at Cassinga or (Moscow and Vietnam) bases, SWAPO had to do something to save face and they came up with Ops Revenge. The strategy was to attack and annihilate Katima Mulilo, Wenela, Golf and Mpacha. A force of SWAPO and Zambian military personnel and equipment was gathered on the other side of the river and longer range weapons were positioned along the riverbank between Sesheke and their border post "Katima Mulilo" which was situated just across the newly scraped no-mans land from Wenela Base, which in turn was situated at the point where the Zambezi River turns into Zambia and the so-called Kaplyn started. I was a Gunner and at the time part of a mortar locating crew. We had come to the Caprivi around three months before and were first situated at Golf and Wenela. One day we were still quietly going about our business when the Genie invaded our camp and began to dig in the Ops room and other key buildings and positions. At the time we should have realized that something was happening, but no information was passed on to us. A couple of weeks later a third set was flown up from South Africa and a tower was built at Katima to raise the screen up on to. Our group was then moved to Katima and we began registering enemy positions along the riverbank using the Cymbeline Radar Set to do so. At that time, there were no known co-odinates that could be used to survey in any of our gun positions or those of the Radar Set which would be necessary to be able to give adjustments to the guns at Golf and/or, the mortars at Romeo Zulu which was situated out of town along the river. This was soon remedied as a surveying team arrived from SA and used the known co-ordinates at Mpacha as a base and performed what we called then "trekmeet" all the way from Mpacha to the Radar Platform at Katima, the base at Golf and the mortars at Romeo Zulu. At least we were now on the same grid. From these known points a map of the area was drawn and the co-ordinates of the enemy positions were registered onto the map. Seeing as the Cymbeline could also pick up any metal, we could plot the movement of motorvehicles and equipment across the river and even were able to plot dust roads and paths over a period of time as the people and equipment followed the road and the co-ords could be plotted. When equipment stopped moving and stayed at a position, those positions were listed as possible enemy positions and were registered as targets.This information was also updated onto the other maps at Golf and Romeo Zulu on a regular basis. One day, on the way back from Wenela to Katima, a SWAPO soldier walked out of the bush at the side of the road and handed himself over to us. He was bristling with weapons, had a new set of camo???s on and was fully kitted out. He said that he had been promised that he would be able to go to university in Moscow if he joined and spent some time with the ???Freedom Fighters??? . He stated that he had been with Swapo for three years now and that most of that time they had not had much to eat and that the promises that had been made were not realizing. His kit was full of food at the time, which was totally the opposite of what he was saying and he explained that they had just been issued with new kit, weapons, food etc, but that he had had enough and had decided to hand himself over. We took him to Katima and handed him over to the Intelligence Officer at the base and I believe he supplied them with some much needed info concerning the build-up of forces across the river. So we spent our days at Katima, waiting for the end of our stint. As was always the case in later years, the gunners and the guys from the armour regiments befriended each other as both were and would always be minority groups wherever we served. We played many soccer games against each other and so-doing some of us made some good friends with them. If I remember correctly, trooper Elworthy was an excellent soccer player and had been selected for some or other SADF soccer team as well. Our Radar set was situated at the North Eastern corner of the base and the armour guys were situated on the South eastern side. So, the days went by and we heard that the armour guys were going home. One night , just before their ???aflos??? arrived, the guns were fired at some ???targets??? on the Kaplyn as an exercise and I believe a donkey was killed by mistake. A week or two later, their ???aflos??? arrived and the armour guys had a braai on their last night, the 23rd of August 1978. We said Good Bye to them and they carried on with their braai. If I remember correctly, the guys that were leaving were told to bed down in the bungalows opposite the mess and the new guys took up their duties in the vacated positions. We all wen to bed and at 01h15 all hell broke loose. I remember waking up to a searing sound and then hearing an explosion not far from our position. This was the first 122mm red eye fired on us and it landed in a mielie field behind the base. It was most probably the fastest I have ever moved and we got to our positions even before the next rocket fell. To start the generator of the Radar Set, one had to get up onto the platform and start it there. I can???t remember who did, but the set was immediately started up and we waited for the next shots. From our positions we could hear the bang as the rocket was fired, see the flames of the rocket motor raising up into the sky and then the motor died . The second rocket descended and fell on the Bungalow opposite the mess. It broke through the roof and as per some armament specialists later, exploded about 1 meter above the floor in the bungalow. At that specific moment, many guys were either running toward the specific part of the bungalow where the missile would hit, or were leaving the bungalow. The reason for this was that the bungalow was designed with two exits, one on each side of the long side of the rectangular building, which meant that all personnel had to move to the centre of the building. It was exactly at that point where the rocket hit. If the rocket had hit the bungalow first or if a later rocket had hit the bungalow, there would have been far less effect. At the time, we only heard the explosion, but did not know the effect of it. With the radar up and running, we started giving through target co-ords to the guns at Golf. One of the prime targets was the ferry across the river on which SWAPO and the Zambian army were now ferrying troops, equipment and supplies across the river. I believe the guns took out the fully loaded ferry with the second shot, effectively stopping the stream of troops, equipment and supplies from reaching the near bank. I believe that this was most probably the most important shot of the battle and turned the odds in our favour. After that initial target, we gave through co-ords of all the registered positions along the bank and systematically wiped out the positions, one by one. During this period, we would hear the bangs of the rockets being fired, see the ???red-eye??? in the sky and soon learnt if we needed to take cover or not. Some writers about this incident state that it was mortar fire, but as a gunner, we were well aware of what shrapnel from a shell looked like vs the shrapnel we picked up the next day which definitely was not the same and was identified as coming from a 122mm rocket. I am not stating that there was no mortar fire, but the explosions around us were definitely from ???red-eyes???. About 20 minutes later, we had effectively silenced the positions along the riverbank and the guns started firing at targets around the town of Sesheke, which is roughly opposite Katima Mulilo on the far bank of the Zambezi. I remember that there was an officer that was either looking after the civilians or had quite a lot to do with them while bomb shelters were being built on the southern side of their houses. In the town there was a microphone system and he was consistently warning the civvies and appealing to them to move to the shelters and if they did not have one yet, to take cover on the southern side of their houses. He must have come from the Boland as he rolled his RR???s and supplied some sort of comic relief during these hours. We would listen to the radio and when the command to fire was given, look toward Golf. The night sky would light up, looking like an intense lightning storm, moments later we would hear the whistle of the shells above us and then hear the massive explosions as they hit their targets on the other side of the river. Experiencing that was and still gives me goose bumps. The unadulterated destructive power of those shells is absolutely awesome. I must say that after SWAPO and the Zambian army stopped firing on us, the effect of those shots coming over was extremely heart warming. The firing continued sporadically throughout the early hours of the morning as new targets were identified and fired upon. Lieutenant (at the time) Schalekamp, joined us and later climbed up onto the water tower to give us the co-ords of visible targets and corrections once the first shots had been fired. He spent some time mopping up wherever he found anything worth firing upon. Later that morning we were told that we could go and get something to eat and the bad news of the bungalow being hit was heard. On arriving at the mess and seeing the bungalow, my life changed in an instant. The bungalow was a mess. Parts of the building, kit, you name it, was strewn across the ground. There was a guy who had been appointed to keep the vultures at bay. At the time we did not know it, but ten of our friends and comrades had been killed and another 10 or 20 injured. There was blood everywhere. Most of the dead and injured had been removed from the area, but the evidence of the ferocity of the blast was to be seen everywhere. Standing in line for breakfast, the coffee can was positioned long before the food and guys would fill up their mugs while waiting for their food. While standing there that morning, some idiot pulled off a shot and everybody dived for cover with hot tea and coffee flying everywhere and burning some of the guys. We all sat and ate in silence and went back to our positions. What I had seen that morning has stayed with me all my life since. It has influenced many of my decisions in my life. In many cases the effect has been negative. The loss of life of those troopers that night, guys whom you shared a part of your life with, played soccer with, ate with, joked with, worked with, just suddenly gone, left a scar. The next day the follow-up went into Zambia and a day or two later they brought a truckload of bodies back. I wanted to see what these guys looked like and wanted to see their dead, possibly to satisfy a feeling of retribution. I walked over to the truck and getting closer I could smell death. I looked at these bodies, my enemy, and seeing them like that felt no remorse, no sympathy. They were all in various stages of rigor mortise and were later layed out on the parade ground for the intelligence guys to inspect. The base at Katima is quite close to a township and we were told that part of our tasks were to protect the local population. Funny though, that night there was not a single person in the township. They had known and I could not understand why they had not told us, seeing as new were their ???protectors???. For many years I walked around with an ingrown mistrust of all black people as I could not understand the issues. Furthermore, the fact that we had killed some of the enemy never made up for the losses we had had. It felt as if the guys that were killed died in vain. Especially after 1994. It is only now, and I thank Arn Durand for giving me the answer, that I can say the following: No, they did not die as part of a well known Op, firing on the enemy and walking away as heroes into the sunset. But, they died, running to get to their weapons, ready to serve their country, ready to take part in a battle that was never given a name, but surely would have been given one, had SWAPO and the Zambian Army been able to succeed in their strategy of retribution for Cassinga. KJ BIGGS, HW DE LANGE, AH ERASMUS, GP ERASMUS, JL LESCH, JJR SCHUTTE, GJ SMIT, WS SMUTS, AD VAN DER MERWE, DM ELWORTHY, WHC BRITZ Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres, There is music in the midst of desolation And a glory that shines upon our tears. They went with songs to the battle, they were young, Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted; They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them. They mingle not with their laughing comrades again; They sit no more at familiar tables of home; They have no lot in our labour of the day-time; They sleep beyond Englands foam.Bobby Thomson
warringtons@eccsystems.co.za
2015-08-06 04:04:40
423My memories of this incident are somewhat vague.... possibly because they are suppressed to protect me from the memories. I was a driver and convoy leader based at Mapacha. I remember the "panza" guys arriving on the flossie on the Saturday afternoon and bumping into a bunch of guys that i had done basics with in Kimberley before being transferred to State Presidents Guard in Pretoria. I had driven then through to Katima and spent some time with them that afternoon as they settled in. When i arrived back in base at Mapacha, we were immediately put on standby as there was rumour that one of the bases would be hit that night. I slept on the back of my buffel that night so that i would be ready to do any follow-up operations. I remember waking up at approx 01h00 and wondering why there was thunder but yet I could see plenty of stars only to realise that it was the guys from golf that were flattening Shesheki. I vaguely remember driving some of the top brass through to Katima the next day when they arrived to inspect. I remember the sight at Katima was probably the most horrific thing I have ever witnessed and it affected me for many many years afterward but the details have become somewhat sketchy.Kim van Zyl
kim@proteas.co.za
2016-02-01 10:24:25
423Very, very, sad. I am pleased to see that Denise and his friends are remembered for fighting for their country, they were the real heroes and always will be. Fortunately my memory is very vague of that evening but it does come back to haunt me from time to time. There are no winners in war but those who lost their lives should be remembered forever. Craig Sharland
sharland@absamail.co.za
2017-09-29 20:17:16
423Very, very, sad. I am pleased to see that Denise and his friends are remembered for fighting for their country, they were the real heroes and always will be. Fortunately my memory is very vague of that evening but it does come back to haunt me from time to time. There are no winners in war but those who lost their lives should be remembered forever. Craig Sharland
sharland@absamail.co.za
2017-09-29 20:17:20
423Very, very, sad. I am pleased to see that Denise and his friends are remembered for fighting for their country, they were the real heroes and always will be. Fortunately my memory is very vague of that evening but it does come back to haunt me from time to time. There are no winners in war but those who lost their lives should be remembered forever. Craig Sharland
sharland@absamail.co.za
2017-09-29 20:17:23
424

Lance and I shared a tent in in 3 SAI, Hotel Coy, at Bloubos, Potch. He ironed our clothes while I boned our boots. Both of us wanted to become pilots, but I was on the shooting range when the Beddies collected the intake. So Lance went to Dunnottar, I stayed in 3 SAI, later that year I joined the SAAF as terminologist, was invited to Lance's solo party but could not make it. About 2 weeks later, his Harvard malfunctioned and Lance went down in a maize field. The farmer who went to his aid thought that Lance was still alive. Alas, a fantastic young man, full of zest and kindness was no more. One of the casualties of those times.

Jo Nel
xylyl7200@yahoo.com
2009-03-04 14:04:26
42412 Sep 1978: 71494751PE Candidate Officer Lancelot Emberger from Central Flying School, Dunnottar was killed when his AT-6 Harvard, Serial No. 7633 failed to recover from a spin and crashed near Delmas. He was 22.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-12 11:17:56
429Gnr Engelbrecht stepped on a land mine and was killed while on operational duty at Tsumeb. He was a member of 1 Medium Battery, 4th Field Artillery Regiment.

2001-05-30 13:37:59
431

16 Sep 1978: 77633956BG Rifleman Gregory James Engeldoe from the South African Cape Corps was killed when his Buffel Troop Carrier overturned in Northern Owamboland. He was 18.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-16 05:31:08
436 I remember it distinctly. The run-up to the attack was as follows: After the successful operation Reindeer and the battle at Cassinga or (Moscow and Vietnam) bases, SWAPO had to do something to save face and they came up with Ops Revenge. The strategy was to attack and annihilate Katima Mulilo, Wenela, Golf and Mpacha. A force of SWAPO and Zambian military personnel and equipment was gathered on the other side of the river and longer range weapons were positioned along the riverbank between Sesheke and their border post "Katima Mulilo" which was situated just across the newly scraped no-mans land from Wenela Base, which in turn was situated at the point where the Zambezi River turns into Zambia and the so-called Kaplyn started. I was a Gunner and at the time part of a mortar locating crew. We had come to the Caprivi around three months before and were first situated at Golf and Wenela. One day we were still quietly going about our business when the Genie invaded our camp and began to dig in the Ops room and other key buildings and positions. At the time we should have realized that something was happening, but no information was passed on to us. A couple of weeks later a third set was flown up from South Africa and a tower was built at Katima to raise the screen up on to. Our group was then moved to Katima and we began registering enemy positions along the riverbank using the Cymbeline Radar Set to do so. At that time, there were no known co-odinates that could be used to survey in any of our gun positions or those of the Radar Set which would be necessary to be able to give adjustments to the guns at Golf and/or, the mortars at Romeo Zulu which was situated out of town along the river. This was soon remedied as a surveying team arrived from SA and used the known co-ordinates at Mpacha as a base and performed what we called then "trekmeet" all the way from Mpacha to the Radar Platform at Katima, the base at Golf and the mortars at Romeo Zulu. At least we were now on the same grid. From these known points a map of the area was drawn and the co-ordinates of the enemy positions were registered onto the map. Seeing as the Cymbeline could also pick up any metal, we could plot the movement of motorvehicles and equipment across the river and even were able to plot dust roads and paths over a period of time as the people and equipment followed the road and the co-ords could be plotted. When equipment stopped moving and stayed at a position, those positions were listed as possible enemy positions and were registered as targets.This information was also updated onto the other maps at Golf and Romeo Zulu on a regular basis. One day, on the way back from Wenela to Katima, a SWAPO soldier walked out of the bush at the side of the road and handed himself over to us. He was bristling with weapons, had a new set of camo???s on and was fully kitted out. He said that he had been promised that he would be able to go to university in Moscow if he joined and spent some time with the ???Freedom Fighters??? . He stated that he had been with Swapo for three years now and that most of that time they had not had much to eat and that the promises that had been made were not realizing. His kit was full of food at the time, which was totally the opposite of what he was saying and he explained that they had just been issued with new kit, weapons, food etc, but that he had had enough and had decided to hand himself over. We took him to Katima and handed him over to the Intelligence Officer at the base and I believe he supplied them with some much needed info concerning the build-up of forces across the river. So we spent our days at Katima, waiting for the end of our stint. As was always the case in later years, the gunners and the guys from the armour regiments befriended each other as both were and would always be minority groups wherever we served. We played many soccer games against each other and so-doing some of us made some good friends with them. If I remember correctly, trooper Elworthy was an excellent soccer player and had been selected for some or other SADF soccer team as well. Our Radar set was situated at the North Eastern corner of the base and the armour guys were situated on the South eastern side. So, the days went by and we heard that the armour guys were going home. One night , just before their ???aflos??? arrived, the guns were fired at some ???targets??? on the Kaplyn as an exercise and I believe a donkey was killed by mistake. A week or two later, their ???aflos??? arrived and the armour guys had a braai on their last night, the 23rd of August 1978. We said Good Bye to them and they carried on with their braai. If I remember correctly, the guys that were leaving were told to bed down in the bungalows opposite the mess and the new guys took up their duties in the vacated positions. We all wen to bed and at 01h15 all hell broke loose. I remember waking up to a searing sound and then hearing an explosion not far from our position. This was the first 122mm red eye fired on us and it landed in a mielie field behind the base. It was most probably the fastest I have ever moved and we got to our positions even before the next rocket fell. To start the generator of the Radar Set, one had to get up onto the platform and start it there. I can???t remember who did, but the set was immediately started up and we waited for the next shots. From our positions we could hear the bang as the rocket was fired, see the flames of the rocket motor raising up into the sky and then the motor died . The second rocket descended and fell on the Bungalow opposite the mess. It broke through the roof and as per some armament specialists later, exploded about 1 meter above the floor in the bungalow. At that specific moment, many guys were either running toward the specific part of the bungalow where the missile would hit, or were leaving the bungalow. The reason for this was that the bungalow was designed with two exits, one on each side of the long side of the rectangular building, which meant that all personnel had to move to the centre of the building. It was exactly at that point where the rocket hit. If the rocket had hit the bungalow first or if a later rocket had hit the bungalow, there would have been far less effect. At the time, we only heard the explosion, but did not know the effect of it. With the radar up and running, we started giving through target co-ords to the guns at Golf. One of the prime targets was the ferry across the river on which SWAPO and the Zambian army were now ferrying troops, equipment and supplies across the river. I believe the guns took out the fully loaded ferry with the second shot, effectively stopping the stream of troops, equipment and supplies from reaching the near bank. I believe that this was most probably the most important shot of the battle and turned the odds in our favour. After that initial target, we gave through co-ords of all the registered positions along the bank and systematically wiped out the positions, one by one. During this period, we would hear the bangs of the rockets being fired, see the ???red-eye??? in the sky and soon learnt if we needed to take cover or not. Some writers about this incident state that it was mortar fire, but as a gunner, we were well aware of what shrapnel from a shell looked like vs the shrapnel we picked up the next day which definitely was not the same and was identified as coming from a 122mm rocket. I am not stating that there was no mortar fire, but the explosions around us were definitely from ???red-eyes???. About 20 minutes later, we had effectively silenced the positions along the riverbank and the guns started firing at targets around the town of Sesheke, which is roughly opposite Katima Mulilo on the far bank of the Zambezi. I remember that there was an officer that was either looking after the civilians or had quite a lot to do with them while bomb shelters were being built on the southern side of their houses. In the town there was a microphone system and he was consistently warning the civvies and appealing to them to move to the shelters and if they did not have one yet, to take cover on the southern side of their houses. He must have come from the Boland as he rolled his RR???s and supplied some sort of comic relief during these hours. We would listen to the radio and when the command to fire was given, look toward Golf. The night sky would light up, looking like an intense lightning storm, moments later we would hear the whistle of the shells above us and then hear the massive explosions as they hit their targets on the other side of the river. Experiencing that was and still gives me goose bumps. The unadulterated destructive power of those shells is absolutely awesome. I must say that after SWAPO and the Zambian army stopped firing on us, the effect of those shots coming over was extremely heart warming. The firing continued sporadically throughout the early hours of the morning as new targets were identified and fired upon. Lieutenant (at the time) Schalekamp, joined us and later climbed up onto the water tower to give us the co-ords of visible targets and corrections once the first shots had been fired. He spent some time mopping up wherever he found anything worth firing upon. Later that morning we were told that we could go and get something to eat and the bad news of the bungalow being hit was heard. On arriving at the mess and seeing the bungalow, my life changed in an instant. The bungalow was a mess. Parts of the building, kit, you name it, was strewn across the ground. There was a guy who had been appointed to keep the vultures at bay. At the time we did not know it, but ten of our friends and comrades had been killed and another 10 or 20 injured. There was blood everywhere. Most of the dead and injured had been removed from the area, but the evidence of the ferocity of the blast was to be seen everywhere. Standing in line for breakfast, the coffee can was positioned long before the food and guys would fill up their mugs while waiting for their food. While standing there that morning, some idiot pulled off a shot and everybody dived for cover with hot tea and coffee flying everywhere and burning some of the guys. We all sat and ate in silence and went back to our positions. What I had seen that morning has stayed with me all my life since. It has influenced many of my decisions in my life. In many cases the effect has been negative. The loss of life of those troopers that night, guys whom you shared a part of your life with, played soccer with, ate with, joked with, worked with, just suddenly gone, left a scar. The next day the follow-up went into Zambia and a day or two later they brought a truckload of bodies back. I wanted to see what these guys looked like and wanted to see their dead, possibly to satisfy a feeling of retribution. I walked over to the truck and getting closer I could smell death. I looked at these bodies, my enemy, and seeing them like that felt no remorse, no sympathy. They were all in various stages of rigor mortise and were later layed out on the parade ground for the intelligence guys to inspect. The base at Katima is quite close to a township and we were told that part of our tasks were to protect the local population. Funny though, that night there was not a single person in the township. They had known and I could not understand why they had not told us, seeing as new were their ???protectors???. For many years I walked around with an ingrown mistrust of all black people as I could not understand the issues. Furthermore, the fact that we had killed some of the enemy never made up for the losses we had had. It felt as if the guys that were killed died in vain. Especially after 1994. It is only now, and I thank Arn Durand for giving me the answer, that I can say the following: No, they did not die as part of a well known Op, firing on the enemy and walking away as heroes into the sunset. But, they died, running to get to their weapons, ready to serve their country, ready to take part in a battle that was never given a name, but surely would have been given one, had SWAPO and the Zambian Army been able to succeed in their strategy of retribution for Cassinga. KJ BIGGS, HW DE LANGE, AH ERASMUS, GP ERASMUS, JL LESCH, JJR SCHUTTE, GJ SMIT, WS SMUTS, AD VAN DER MERWE, DM ELWORTHY, WHC BRITZ Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres, There is music in the midst of desolation And a glory that shines upon our tears. They went with songs to the battle, they were young, Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted; They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them. They mingle not with their laughing comrades again; They sit no more at familiar tables of home; They have no lot in our labour of the day-time; They sleep beyond Englands foam.Bobby Thomson
warringtons@eccsystems.co.za
2015-08-06 04:14:22
443

Major Ed Every was killed in action when his Mirage F1AZ was shot down whilst on an operational sortie.

Unknown
Unknown
2001-05-30 13:37:59
443After releasing their bombs, Minne and Every broke out to the left while the other pair went right. Minne heard Every shout, : Break left!??? and promptly obeyed. Seconds later he heard Nel shouting, ??? Eject! Eject!??? Reaching the safety of low level, Minne could see the plume of smoke where Major Ed Every???s aircraft had crashed??????.He was 31. Vlamgat. Dick Lord(RIP)Giep Vermeulen
giep.vermeulen@gmail.com
2015-01-16 14:31:44
444

Towards the end of 1987 two platoons of D Company (Jan 1986 ? Dec 1987), 1 Parachute Battalion were seconded to 5 Reconnaissance Regiment. The platoons were under command of Capt PA Pienaar (Pine), 2IC of D Coy and the platoon commanders were Lt J de V Kruys and 2Lt F J Wiese.

Together with members of 5 and 2 Reconnaissance Regiments, the members of D Coy took part in an attack on a Swapo base in central Angola. The operation was named Ops Firewood.

The attack commenced at dawn on 31 October 1987 and the SA forces only withdrew after dark on the same day. It was estimated that more than 300 Swapo fighters were killed during the battle.

At the end of the day Cpl N S Olivier, L/Cpl R M Light, Rfn H N de Rose, Rfn D W van Rooyen and Rfn W F Ewels were dead, killed in action. Several other members of D Coy was also wounded during the battle and Rfn J m Schuurman died on 1 November 1987 of his wounds.

Capt P A Pienaar the 2IC of D Coy who was in charge of the two platoons was killed in West Africa almost 10 years later, on 29 October 1997.

The names of these members of D Coy appear on the Wall of Remembrance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein.

We remember our comrades who paid the highest price on that day in 1987. They were all heroes and proud paratroopers.

Ex Alto Vincimus - We Conquer from Above



2003-08-28 14:18:07
444

I Bazil Johnson(2Lt) 2 SAI infantry Battallion. Wayne Ewels my bud, we spent our primary school years together at the same desk, played rugby as foes for 5 years and greeting you on the runway at Rundu that September 1987, I never expected for you to go so soon. May you rest in peace my friend and may you somehow find this message that I leave for you here.

bazil johnson
baziljohnson@hotmail.com
2010-02-28 22:05:20
444Hey Bud, 23 years sounds like a long time, but it could have been yesterday! You were respected and we still honour you.Barber
llen@lantic.net
2010-06-02 08:22:07
444

So many years ago, but still remember your faces like yesterday , U our hero's !!!!!!

 

Kalahari
Dolfbloem@Ananzi.co.za
2010-08-01 21:23:42
444I think of Wane, Jean, Hughes, Dirk, Raymond and Nic so often. They were so young it is difficult to believe it has been 23 years. It is really good to see others remember them too.

The evening before the attack Raymond was in good form keeping everyones spirits up, he always enjoyed himself. Hughes was a good friend of Raymond and they were together with their crowd. 

Dirk was quiet and kept to himself, he wrote a letter to his parents, I later found out that the army found the letter and delivered it to them. 

Wane was a close friend and he told me he feared the worst, he was one of the nicest people I have ever had the priveledge of knowing.

Jean Schuurman was also a considerate and gentle, a very nice guy.

Nic Olivier did not train with us so we did not know him as well as each other but he was a decent guy and he treated us well. I remember he played chess and was some kind of a champion at school.
Michael Jeffery
silviasboys@gmail.com
2010-08-25 16:26:59
444I've met Jean Schuurman at the pool table at the Ondangwa Ops Hospital during September 1987. I was a 26 year old 2Lt.(doctor) at the hospital and Jean was an ops medic at the parabats, stationed not far from us in the same base.
He called me his neighbor,since he was from Grey College Bloemfontein and I was a Kovsie. I was with the parabats, as one of their doctors, on October 31 during Operation Firewood. When Jean was wounded we did our best to help him untill he was casavaced by copper to Ondangwa. We arrived a day later at Ondangwa. Jean was still alive. I played my music tapes for him in the ward. He got tears in his eyes when Sias Reynecke's "ou Karooland" was playing and wanted us to play it several times.
I took him down to 1 Mil in the C130 the next day (I think it was November 2, 1987). On the way down, somewhere over Botswana, Jean's pupils started dilating and I knew that he was leaving us. I was holding his left hand while he was dying and I was praying for him. I am sure that he was at piece with God.
Every year on October 31, I think of the brave men who died on that day during 1987. Capt Rademeyer, Cpl Olivier, Lt Botes, Light, De La Rose and all the others. May they rest in piece and I hope that the Lord had brought His healing to the broken hearts of the parents and family of these brave men.
Lt Wouter de Bruin
wdebruin4@gmail.com
2011-05-09 07:02:07
444Brave souls each and everyone that passed that fateful day 31/10/1987.
Dear friend and remembered each day Wayne Ewels small in stature like myself, but with heart of a lion.I have and will always live each day to its best
in your and all our fallen friends honour.Rest in peace , missed always.
EWEN SMITH
ewen@ewen3.wanadoo.co.uk
2011-09-20 15:00:24
445

I believe that NO 445 EYBERS was attached to 1 Special Services Battalion in Bloemfontein. The reason for this is that 2SSB had only one intake a year and he was never with us.

Mike James
Mjames0255@msn.com
2008-11-20 10:01:32
445

Tpr Eybers was a driver of an armoured car. He was driving at the head of the squadron when they were ambushed by Cubans north of a town called Ebo on 24 November 1975. His armoured car was hit by an anti tank shell and Eybers took the full impact of the explosion. The car was toppled to its side.

The other two crew members survived the attack and were forced to remain in the car throughout the engagement.

When the squadron withdrew from the battle, the crew had to wait until dark before they could escape.

His body was not recovered and must have been buried by the enemy in the field of honour.

Mike James
Mjames0255@msn.com
2008-11-20 10:21:24
445 Trooper Eybers was with 1SSB and was an armor car driver and was killed in the Early stages of operation Savannah and was given a military funeral in South Africa Coenie BEKKER
southernforklifts@telkomsa.net
2009-09-18 14:41:22
445I have over 35 yrs tried to find Ebyers family but with no luck he was buried and no body has been back to his grave Here is a man who gave his life but nobody wants to remember him But I will till i close my eyes and join you so that we can march together Your soldier friend Coenie BEKKER Coenie Bekker
coenieb@topsecurity.co.za
2011-05-06 15:17:04
445My brother Pieter Gabriel Eybers died 2 May 1975: 70387378N Trooper Pieter Gabriel Eybers from 2 Special Service Battalion was accidentally killed when he fell out of a patrol observation post in the Operational Area. He was 20Maria Eybers
seamusria@live.co.za
2017-03-08 19:54:54
44512 May 1975Maria Eybers
seamusria@live.co.za
2017-03-08 19:57:04
445My brother died 2 May 1975: 70387378N Trooper Pieter Gabriel Eybers from 2 Special Service Battalion was accidentally killed when he fell out of a patrol observation post in the Operational Area. and not as listed otherwise.Maria Eybers
seamusria@live.co.za
2017-03-08 20:16:23
445Coenie Bekker ons was nog baie jonk toe ons broer dood is en nie almal weet van die site nie en ons treur in ons harte nie op n site nie.Glo my ons onthou ons broer. Julle info is verkeerd hy was nie n amour kar bestuurder nie.Maria Eybers
seamusria@live.co.za
2017-03-08 20:33:27
446

Not breaking tradition as a PF instructor, Sgt Furstenburg was a respected hardliner and merciless disciplinarian. On numerous occasions I personally endured his one to one "special treatment", testing my physical and mental capabilities to the uppermost limit. He did however compliment my stamina or ability to "Vasbyt" (which obviously made him go up slightly on my estimation chart).

He was tragically killed in a "friendly fire" incident along with two other soldiers, Rfn Wilters and a Sgt Markx. The incident took place near Ombalantu (Owamboland) during a routine anti-SWAPO night ambush set-up. Feedback was that for some reason the victims apparently stood up without warning, subsequently being mercilessly shot several times by one of their own.

Amazingly only one Rfn had opened fire and apparently every single bullet fired was a hit. Sgt Furstenburg had been shot more than five times. Initial inquest deemed the incident a tragic accident and the individual that opened fire, was granted a "Discharge" on the grounds of "traumatic psychological experience".

More than a year later I had the pleasure of spending 21 days in "Durban Beach" (Detention Barracks near Pretoria) and was astonished to see the "marksman" there. Querying him he explained that he had been charged with murder. Two witnesses had stated that they had heard him gloating about his actions having been deliberate.

Intriguing hey? I do not know what the outcome of the "Court Marshal" was, but what still baffles me is the accuracy of the shots.

LJ
LAlturas@aol.com
2006-12-15 03:09:36
446

Thank you John for your information displayed about my husband no 446 JPA Furstenburg. I got it now for the first time.

Much information was witheld at that stage and after 33 years I read that he was shot 5 times and accurately. The outcome of the courtcase after 3 years was planned murder. High Court Windhoek Namibia.

A very traumatic incident in the lives of my son and myself. We survived and are happy to see the information is on the internet. In fact it is his birthday today and he would have turned 57. He was shot at the age of 24. I still decide to write a book on experiences based on the SWA war as a war widow.

You are doing a great job.

Tossie Theunissen (Furstenburg)
theunisseng@gmail.com
Tossie Theunissen (Furstenburg)
theunisseng@gmail.com
2010-04-12 01:04:01
446I did duty in 1975-6 and was trained during basics by Sgt Jan Furstenburg. 
A tough instructor but what he taught us kept me alive through to 1984 when my duty ended.
I have repeatedly stated that I would enter any battle or operation with Jan F.
He was a damn fine soldier and a good man, it was his job to teach us warfare and he performed that function professionally.
His fine  memory will live with me forever,
"een van Jan se twee soutpiele"
I salute you Jan Furstenburg
Allan korsman
korsmans@iafrica.com
2012-05-17 04:35:01
446I did duty in 1975-6 and was trained during basics by Sgt Jan Furstenburg. 
A tough instructor but what he taught us kept me alive through to 1984 when my duty ended.
I have repeatedly stated that I would enter any battle or operation with Jan F.
He was a damn fine soldier and a good man, it was his job to teach us warfare and he performed that function professionally.
His fine  memory will live with me forever,
"een van Jan se twee soutpiele"
I salute you Jan Furstenburg
Allan korsman
korsmans@iafrica.com
2012-05-17 04:35:11
446

29 Sep 1977: Four members from 4 SAI were killed in a friendly fire incident at Okalongo when a soldier who was watching the rear of the ambush position suddenly turned around and opened fire on his fellow soldiers. The soldier in question subsequently appeared in the Windhoek Supreme Court on a charge of murder but was medically diagnosed as having acute schizophrenia and subsequently declared medically unfit to stand trial.

The casualties in this unfortunate incident were:

  • 69206464PE Sergeant Jan Pieter Albertus Furstenburg. He was 24
  • 74413659BB Corporal Leslie Muller. He was 19.
  • 74281734BG Rifleman Jan Joachim Jacobus de Vos. He was 18
  • 74382862BG Rifleman Cornelius Johannes Lourens. He was 19
Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-30 11:37:51
448Died during basics. During Pole-PT a pole fell on his head. He had to hold it behind his head and do press-ups. It fell on his head and killed him.

2001-05-30 13:37:59
448This accident happened at SAS Saldanha. It was at the end of basics, just before Seaman Farmer was due to report for duty in Simonstown. They were doing pole p.t. The pole was carried by three men above their heads. The pole slipped out of the hands of the two guys behind Seaman Farmer. It fell on his neck, breaking his neck. He died subsequently at the sick bay. Dianne
diannedef@gmail.com
2017-02-19 12:25:30
450

On 11 February 1985, a patrol from 32 Battalion's Charlie Company were in the vicinity of the Bale River, when their over-eager company commander took a short cut, against earlier advice from headquarters, and blundered straight into a well-prepared SWAPO base, manned by some 100 insurgents. In the 25 minute battle that ensued, Charlie Company suffered heavy casualties.

In all, 12 men from Charlie Company were killed in this action or died of their wounds soon afterwards, and many more were wounded. The seven fatalities in the inital contact were:

  • Lieutenant Dave Light (killed instantly by a bullet that struck him below his left eye).
  • Rifleman P. Kahete (severe schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman A. de Almeida (a gunshot that penetrated both lungs)
  • Rifleman P. Jose (multiple schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman K. Kalonga (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Rifleman J.C. Chihamba (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Lance Corporal J.A. Sachilombo (multiple schrapnel wounds, including to abdomen)

After dark, while the casualties were being moved to a temporary emergency base, another three wounded men, all suffering from massive chest wounds, died. They were

  • Riflemen J. Fernando,
  • M. Joaquim and
  • M. Chipoya.
  • During the night another badly wounded Rifleman, M.A. Kinguelke, also died. The final death was that of Rifleman M. Muema, who succumbed to his schrapnel wounds at 10:00 the next morning.

    Later, radio intercepts indicated that SWAPO lost 15 men killed and a number wounded in this contact, and a further two SWAPO insurgents were killed by Charlie Company and one captured when they approached the base on the morning of 12th February.

    Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-09 09:45:38
451By 1991 the SWA War was over - Ido mot want to deny any Honours to this Commandant, maybe you have the date wrongHerman
tracol@telkomsa.net
2008-09-17 20:04:50
452

26 Sep 1988: 86628708BG Gunner Ignatius Wilhelmus Ferreira from 4 Field Regiment was killed in a hit and run accident 9km from Kathu on the Kuruman road when he was struck by a civilian vehicle while assisting to dig out a field gun that was stuck in the sand. He was 21.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-27 04:10:27
454You have this individuals initials wrong, his correct name was Johan Lemmer Caparus Ferreira. He was captured along with Van der Mescht by Swapo just before sunup on 19 February 1978 in Ovamboland, but unlike Van der Mescht , he refused to go along with his captors and was murdered by the Swapo gang .
The leader of the gang Ruben "Danger" Ashipala stated to Beeld newspaper, 14 December 2009 " ???Ons het n??g een gevang. ???n Groot Boer. Maar hy wou nie loop nie. Toe maak ons hom dood.???. Rfn Ferreira was shot numerous times  and bayoneted by his captors. More than 27 bullet wounds and 40 plus bayonet wounds were counted on his body
jochen
jochenstadler@gmail.com
2013-05-27 11:01:21
456

THE SADF Man Who Died In Angola Identified

PRETORIA Sept 11 1992 Sapa

Pathologists have established that the remains of a South African Army medical orderly killed by enemy action while travelling with a Unita convoy in Angola in 1985 are those of Cpl Bruce Andrew Fidler, whose parents live in Florida, Johannesburg.

In a statement on Friday, the SA Army said Cpl Fidler's remains were returned to South Africa by the Angolan authorities in June this year.

The date of Cpl Fidler's death was officially declared as September 15, 1985.

His identity was finally established with the aid of his dental records, the Army statement said.

The young soldier's remains will be cremated on September 15 -- exactly seven years after his death. The service, with full military honours, will be from the Methodist Church in Florida.

Source

JP Bonnici
bonnicijp@gmail.com
2010-01-29 20:08:46
456

Born 23 Feb 1963. Son of Mr. & Mrs. F. W. Fidler of Johannesburg. During a movement his unit was ambushed and he was subsequently captured and interrogated. Cpl Fidler was executed by the enemy during brutal interrogation. He never revealed the presence of his nearby unit although been brutally interrogated thereby enabling them to escape and evade. His remains was repatriated back to South Africa 10 years later and on 15 September 1995 he was cremated precisely 10 years after his death. Corporal Fidler was posthumously awarded the Honoris Crux Silver (only 27 were ever awarded ) for his actions of bravery. Cpl Fidler's name appears on both the roll of honour of 1 Parachute Battalion and 7 Medical Battalion Groups.

Jon
JonToohey@aol.com
2011-04-28 23:53:36
456Rather late than never. Bruce and I where at Florida Park High School together. Bruce became Head Boy. We played first team rugby together and we were both props - two big okes - but unfortunately our collective skill as an English rugby team did not measure up well against the traditional Afrikaans rugby playing schools (Monnas and Helpmekaar etc) We lost touch while both in the army and the next thing I knew was the tragic news. Bruce was a born leader at school already and I am proud to have been quite close to him as a school mate. I went to 3 SAI, then on to Bourkes Luck Doggies from where I completed my service. RIP Bruce, gone but not forgotten.Peter Walters
peter.walters@mintailssa.co.za
2015-02-03 03:22:41
456

15 Sep 1985: 79517090BG Corporal Bruce Andrew Fidler HC (Posthumous) from 7 Medical Battalion Group was attached to 44 Parachute Regiment during Operations in Southern Angola in support of UNITA. His unit was ambushed and in the ensuing firefight, he was captured by enemy forces and was subsequently Reported Missing. Bruce was brutally tortured and interrogated by the enemy before being executed but he never once revealed the presence of his nearby unit thereby enabling the 7 Medical Battalion Group Surgical Team of between 5 and 10 doctors to successfully evade capture and reach South African lines.

His remains were repatriated back to South Africa in June 1992 and he was cremated on 15 September 1992. Corporal Bruce Fidler was posthumously awarded the Honoris Crux for his bravery and selfless devotion to duty in the face of brutal torture. His name appears on the Roll of Honour for both 1 Parachute Battalion and 7 Medical Battalion Group. He was 21.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-16 04:49:15
461

Sgt A.R. Foote's Story

Sgt Foote (A.R) (Bob) was a flight mechanic on the first Alouette 111 that the Air Force lost.

It happened in the du Toit's kloof when the chopper flew into some high tension cables.

All aboard were killed.

I saw the remains arrive at Ysterplaat on a Queen Mary.

Very little left recognisable as a helicopter.

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2001-05-30 00:00:00
4611501 van rooyen g.n. killed in bosbok aircraft accident tinley manor beach.

2001-05-30 13:37:59
461person 1500 cmdt. van rooyen. killed when frelon helicopter he was piloting lost power and crashed at hoedspruit

2001-05-30 13:37:59
462

Eddie Forbes is interested in contact with the relatives of Alexander.

Can be contacted on forbes@tiscali.co.za  
Eddie
forbes@tiscali.co.za
2010-12-10 20:44:40
464

CO F J Forster of 1 Recce died in shooting incident at Katima Mulilo, accident during "livefire" shooting drills

Johan Meyer
tazzrat@gmail.com
2009-04-24 15:35:17
468Tpr Fourie was a Eland Armor'd vehicle support trooper, he was killed along with two of his friends while on a opp's in the south of Angola . A troop consisted of two 60 mm and two 90 mm armored vehicle's better known as noddy's along with 8 support troopers in a Buffel personnel carrier. The troop went into a temporary base formation better known as a t/b for the night, the next morning TPR Fourie along with L-CPL O P Kruger and 
L-CPL P Kruger, who were crew commanders on the two 60 mm Elands (the Kruger brothers were identical twin's) walked out of the t/b perimeter on of them stepped on a antipersonnel mine which in turn detonated a land mine all three were killed. Rumor has it they went for a (pee)      
Brandt
steven@autoexeccorp.co.za
2012-09-04 08:55:29
470Rfn J.C. Fourie was a member of Regiment Groot Karoo, and was killed in action on 31 December 1983 at Cuvelai in Angola, during Operation Askari.Peter
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2008-10-29 20:35:26
470

More info here Regiment Mooirivier and South African Transborder Operations into Angola during 1975/76 and 1983/84

Jakes Louw
jakeslouw@gmail.com
2009-09-10 08:27:32
471I knew "Mannetjies" well as he was in my section.  He died when we were ambushed on the 16th December 1979 near Nkongo.  We knew it was coming as another platoon had been ambushed on the 14th December and we were doing a follow up.  Just before going into the TB on the 15th, Aubrey Riley and I went back on our tracks and saw that our ttracks had been trodden on with Sargent stripe boots.

We headed out from our TB on the morning of the 16th (DingaansDay) and followed the Swapo tracks.  After about 10 minutes we heard a noise to our left flank, the flank we were on.  We went down for a while and listened and then decided to go on.  After a few feet all hell broke loose.

We received heavy fire from the left flank and then the mortars began to fall.  According to the 32Bn folks nearby, the contact lasted about 20 minutes.  At the end of the contact we tried to revive "Mannetjies" who had a mortar land a little way in front of him but were unable to revive him, a tragic loss of a great friend and rugby player.

Of the 33 of us who went into the battle, we had two dead and 16 wounded.  We are told that there were approx three platoons that smacked us.  They left one wounded Swapo behind who did not survive ....  who knows what they dragged away and buried. 

Mark McKay 75300087
Yankeezulu53565@yahoo.com
2012-02-13 18:29:48
471i remember this day so well, i was also there and remember. Mark Watson
watson766@sky.com
2013-07-08 06:01:09
473

Died in shooting incident, at Ladysmith

Ralph McLean
ralph@southafricawargraves.org
2009-07-09 20:03:27
477

Explosion.

Possible Date: 1982-09-23

Possible Name: Lewis

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2002-11-21 17:21:15
478Chris died when the Harvard he flew (7 Squadron, Cape Town) hit the ground during a training excercise for foward air controllers (FAC) at Oudshorn during April 1975. Koos van Rensburg
jp@reprorisk.co.za
2012-05-14 05:29:20
482Gabriel was killed in an ambush during a follow up operation.
He was a part of Romeo Mike 4
Steve Grenfell (Lt RM4)
steve@dunrobinnursery.co.za
2011-09-13 13:29:21
485

Killed while moving from a ambush site towards sound of terrs using a different footpath ran into ambush.

johan
prints@algoanet.com
2006-12-30 10:46:00
485

Dear John

During June 2008, I visited the cemetery at Tsumeb and found the grave of Lt Kurt Gagiano, photo attached. He is listed as person 485 on the ROH website.

I have no nothing of this person other than what is available on the grave e.g. age. What I would like to know is why he was buried in Tsumeb. Was he originally from Tsumeb? I do not know much of the Gagiano family other than of a senior officer in the current air force.

Please use the photo for the website. If I can be of any further assistance, please feel free to contact me.

Regards
Christo Giani
Christo Giani
christo.giani@ananzi.co.za
2008-09-10 21:32:03
485

Hi Christo my name is Ruan Kurt Gagiano. My father's name is Enrico Gagiano and Kurt was his brother. They lived in Tsumeb at that time with his other brother and parents. I got my name from Kurt. My dad is still in the army stationed at Kroonstad millitary base. And Carlo Gagiano from the airforce is his cousin. If you want to make contact with me or my dad just send me a email and my dad can tell you something you might want to know.

Thank you all for all the stories.

my regards

 

Ruan Kurt Gagiano
kruger.ruandi@gmail.com
2010-01-17 19:16:27
485                               

I was sad today when browsing on the internet and i came upon this site. Lt Kurt Gagiano was one of the Lt's in Charley Company, 2 SAI Battalion, Walvis Bay, 1975 to 1976 when i did national service. I remember him very well as i served in the same Company as a Rfn and we did Border Duty together. He must have joined 101 Battalion, SWATF when we left to come home in Feb 1976. R.I.P. Lt Kurt Gagiano, i SALUTE you.

Fred van Loggerenberg
fredvanl@gmail.com
2012-09-28 06:30:00
486

On 11 February 1985, a patrol from 32 Battalion's Charlie Company were in the vicinity of the Bale River, when their over-eager company commander took a short cut, against earlier advice from headquarters, and blundered straight into a well-prepared SWAPO base, manned by some 100 insurgents. In the 25 minute battle that ensued, Charlie Company suffered heavy casualties.

In all, 12 men from Charlie Company were killed in this action or died of their wounds soon afterwards, and many more were wounded. The seven fatalities in the inital contact were:

  • Lieutenant Dave Light (killed instantly by a bullet that struck him below his left eye).
  • Rifleman P. Kahete (severe schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman A. de Almeida (a gunshot that penetrated both lungs)
  • Rifleman P. Jose (multiple schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman K. Kalonga (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Rifleman J.C. Chihamba (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Lance Corporal J.A. Sachilombo (multiple schrapnel wounds, including to abdomen)

After dark, while the casualties were being moved to a temporary emergency base, another three wounded men, all suffering from massive chest wounds, died. They were

  • Riflemen J. Fernando,
  • M. Joaquim and
  • M. Chipoya.
  • During the night another badly wounded Rifleman, M.A. Kinguelke, also died. The final death was that of Rifleman M. Muema, who succumbed to his schrapnel wounds at 10:00 the next morning.

    Later, radio intercepts indicated that SWAPO lost 15 men killed and a number wounded in this contact, and a further two SWAPO insurgents were killed by Charlie Company and one captured when they approached the base on the morning of 12th February.

    Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-09 09:48:33
488Bruce Gaylard was my Mothers cousin. Bruce was killed with H.Booysen in 1962 during flight training where Bruce was an instructor. They were flying a Harvard. Bruce's father was also a pilot and was killed during the second world war. Bruce's mother died in 2002 after a sad life loosing her husband and only son to aircraft accidents. Bruce is buried in the East cemetary in East London, and his mothers ashed are buried at the foot of his grave.Patrick Warner
patrick@sainet.co.za
2006-11-10 13:59:14
490

Killed in Action (Tank took out Ratel)

4th January 1984

Niel Wiid
niel@systemiclogic.net
2009-10-24 12:16:25
491

As far as I can recall Martin was killed at Pomfret in the Northern Cape - 32Bn's base during Parachute Training. He was a keen photographer and was taking a video of a Dakota as it was taking of from the runway. He was standing at the end of the runway and the tail wheel of the Dakota hit him on take-off. He was killed instantly.

Johan Kruys
mwkruys@mweb.co.za
2003-08-27 13:10:06
492

Gerhard Genis. A brilliant scholar. Matriculated from Springs Boys High 1976. Was tragically killed in a Silver Falcons training exercise when the wing of the Impala aircraft broke off.

John
johnnybooysen@tiscali.co.za
2012-08-03 12:16:54
493

An Error of Judgement

From Fields of Air by James Byrom

When things are going well it is all too easy to become overconfident and not give proper attention to one's duties. I Ching (BC 1150)

It was a Wednesday that will live in my memory all my days. 26 May 1971. I was chief sub-editor of the Natal Mercury in Durban, responsible for getting the paper ready for the press. I arrived at work to learn that three military jets had crashed into Table Mountain. Eleven senior officers of the South African Air Force had been killed. It was undoubtedly the worst multi-aircraft disaster in the peacetime aviation history of South Africa.

I was told to stand by for stories and photographs from the Cape Times. Those were the days before computers and desk top publishing and scanning of pictures. The type had to be set in lead -hot-type we called it- and the photographs, or blocks, were etched with acid into metal. They were processes that took time, so deadlines had to be strictly adhered to if the first editions were to catch trains and connections for country distribution. We had a few minutes' latitude with the second edition, which was for street sale and surburban deliveries, but the first edition had to be off my desk by midnight.

As the evening wore on we got the early pages out of the way and began the front page after eleven o'clock. The reporters of the Cape Times were thoroughly professional, and the telex machines had rattled furiously all evening as their stories came over the wires. But there was a delay with the photographs. The later it got, the more anxious I became. I could not hold back the front page, so making up went ahead, with a large space left on the page for a picture. Several telephone calls were made to Cape Town to find out when the pictures would be coming through, but all I got were assurances that they would be sent as soon as they had been cleared by the authorities. As the landline pictures still had to be developed after they had been received, a messenger was standing by in the receiving room to run the canisters to the photographic department, where darkroom assistants were also waiting.

As the clock ticked rentlessly towards midnight, my anxieties grew. Fifteen minutes to go...ten minutes...five minutes...Even if the landline machines began receiving now, the picture that was being run would not be received in time for the edition. And there was still the hole on the front page to fill! I looked up at the wall clock again; and then it caught my eye. There on the wall next to the clock was a large insurance company calender with a beautiful picture of that side of Table Mountain where the crash had occurred. I snatched the telephone from its cradle and asked the girl on the switchboard to get me the Cape Times again. While the call was coming through, I told someone to bring me the calender. Cape Town was on the line. "Sorry about the pictures. They have been released and they will be running within seconds," I was told. "Never mind. I've got a calender with a picture of Table Mountain showing the Rhodes Memorial and the inland side of the mountain. If you can give me an X-marks-the-spot I can use it." I said. The same calender was hanging in the Cape Times newsroom! Over the telephone we were able to pinpoint the site of the crash; and the first edition went to press with that picture as our only illustration.

Two hours later dramatic photographs had been received, and the second edition went to press with a new page one. But our calender picture showed so well where on the mountain the crash had happened that it was retained on an inside page for the later edition.

The three jets were a variation of the Hawker Siddeley 125, a twin-engined executive transport jet. They were the VIP flight of the South African Air Force. The SAAF called them Mercurius, but they were the ninth version of the HS-125, which first flew in 1962. They had a crew of two and, depending on their configuration, could take from seven to twelve passengers in airline seating. The cabins were pressurised and the cabins were fitted with drop-out oxygen masks and toilets. They were technically still on the secret list, to be shown to the public for the first time at the tenth Republic Festival celebration flypast on 31 May. On the day of the crash they were taking part in a rehearsal. Eye-witnesses saw the three jets fly over the saluting dais and then do a right-hand sweep that took them into the clouds. Soon afterwards there was a great explosion as all three crashed into Devils Peak above the Rhodes Memorial. One witness who saw the aircraft a moment or two before they struck said that one appeared to break away from the formation. But if teh pilot had seen the mountain through a break in the clouds, it was too late. The explosion shook the tearoom at the Rhodes Memorial and was heard over a wide area.

The first news to reach DF Malan Airport came from a switchboard operator at Groote Schuur Hospital, who saw two of the jets smash into the mountain. Confirmation came a few minutes later when a game guard reported that he had seen the explosion on the mountain. Immediately police and rescue personnel went into action, but there was little that could be done. The side of the mountain was clothed in thick fog. It was raining and the slopes were muddy and slippery, which made searching almost impossible. After a cold, wet climb, rescuers reported back on the grim scene on the mountain. So completely were the Mercurius jets destroyed that probably only the pilots could have had a split-second look into the face of death. The passengers knew nothing.

Planning for the event had been going on for two and a half months, and because of the unsettled weather in the Cape at that time of year, senior officers had worked out five complex plans to put on the safest and best display possible. These ranged from a magnificant clear-weather displayvin which more than two hundred SAAF aircraft- Impalas, Mirages, Vampires, Canberras, Buccaneers, Skymasters, Shackletons, helicopters, Cessnas, Albatrosses and Dakotas- would fly past at different altitudes in ten action-packed minutes, to a display in thickly overcast weather of helicopters only, flying at five hundred feet. Three hundred and fifty pilots and crew were backed up by five hundred and fifty ground crew and communications staff. The Operation had been planned with great precision. For the various aircraft to arrive over the dais at the right times, bearing in mind the great differences in their speeds, timing had to be calculated to split seconds. There could be no overlaps, nor could there be large gaps between the formations. Precautions had even been made in the event of engine trouble, and pilots were instructed to head for the open sea where lifeboats and rescue squads were standing by.

To understand the disaster, it is necessary to look at some of the planning in greater detail. Several plans had been worked out to make provision for variable weather. However all the plans were subject to the requirement that all flying was to be carried out in visual conditions, that is, the pilots would be able to see the ground at all times. Electronic navigation aids were sited for the safe routing of aircraft, and all these were tested in practice. All pilots received written orders as well as detailed verbal pre-flight briefing, and were shown key points along the routes, from the air and on the ground. The planners worked out holding areas for various types of aircraft, the routes they would take to the dais, the fly-past routes, the heights and speeds, the turning points and the routes from south of the saluting-base back to their bases, DF Malan Airport, the SAAF base at Ysterplaat and the Flying Training School at Langebaanweg. Summersfield was designated a reserve airfield. Planners also made sure that routes, turns and altitudes would prevent collisions between aircraft and, if the weather should turn nasty, they would keep the aircraft away from high ground. To make sure that the various groups of aircraft passed the saluting base within a certain number of seconds, aircraft with different speeds were grouped in blocks and instructed to fly at certain speeds and heights. There were seven speed blocks, and the Mercurius aircraft were grouped with the Vampires and Impalas in the sixth block with a stipulated speed of 250 knots. After the fly-past there was always the danger that the different aircraft might catch up with one another or collide on their return to base. To avoid that, formations were instructed either to fly straight on or turn to the left or right after the completion of the fly-past. Aircraft with longer endurances, such as the Shackletons, Hercules, Dakotas, Skymasters, Albatrosses, Canberras and Buccaneers, were to fly straight ahead. Aircraft with short endurances- Vampires and Mirages- were to turn left and return to DF Malan Airport. Turning right to return to their base at Langebaanweg, the Mercurius jets and Impalas took a breakaway route from south of the saluting base over low ground over the Swart River area. This was the safest route, for if they had turned left to return to base they would have had to fly over high ground, which would have been dangerous in bad weather. The right turn for the Mercurius and Impala aircraft was calculated mathematically at a rate of one turn, that is, three degrees a second. This at 250 knots, from a point thirty seconds flying time, also at 250 knots, south of the saluting-base would have given the aircraft a safe distance of two miles east of Devils Peak. This calculation was tested in practice and found correct by the control staff. Leaders of formations were also given the opportunity to practice the turn and to comment on the practicability of this manoeuvre. The leaders of the Mercurius and Impala teams flew the route and turned twice, once on the day of the accident, but neither made any comments to the control staff about the plan. An extensive communications centre at Goodwood kept formation leaders and control staff under strict supervision, and the positions of formations could be ascertained and correlated with planned positions at all times. The communications system also allowed liaison between leaders of formations and enabled them to report changes in the weather and to receive new instructions from the control centre. There were no breakdowns in this communications system, and it worked perfectly. So what went so terribly wrong on that practice flight on Wednesday, 26 May 1971?

At the various bases and over the saluting dais the weather was suitable for the rehearsal. However, during the fly-past, the base of a broken layer of cloud south of the dais was down to eight hundred feet, and approval was given by control center for formation leaders to reduce height to maintain visual flight. This was in accordance with instructions to formation leaders, including the leader of the Mercurius jets. While flying towards the dais, the leader of the Vampires radioed to the leader of the Mercurius jets. He was thirty seconds behind the Mercurius jets, but he wanted confirmation that they were not behind time according to the tight schedule. When the Mercurius leader confirmed that they were ten seconds late, the Vampire leader increased speed to 280 knots, at which speed he flew over the saluting dais. The distance between the Vampire and Mercurius formations at first decreased, then remained constant, which meant that the Mercurius leader also probably increased speed. When the Mercurius formation flew into the broken cloud soon after flying over the dais, it maintained its planned height of a thousand feet. In doing so, the formation leader chose to ignore the overriding instruction that visual flight was to be maintained at all times. Why did he do that? We can only suppose, as the board of inquiry did, that the leader regarded the flight in cloud as a common occurrence, for as a transport pilot he had complete confidence in his own ability and his instruments. The Impalas, however, which were following the Mercurius formation, were taken by their leader below the clouds where they were able to maintain visual flight as ordered. And what about instrument flying? The Mercurius had weather radar, but even if it was switched on, it is doubtful whether the leader would have had time to pay much attention to it.

The board of inquiry ran through the fatal flight in every detail. It flew the identical course in an identical aircraft. Then, together with evidence from eyewitnesses, it was able to reproduce the exact flight path of the Mercurius formation. It showed that the principal cause of the accident was simply that the formation turned much wider than had been planned and which the leader had been instructed to do in his briefing before the flight. The formation was flying faster than had been stipulated in its attempt to make up the few seconds that it had lost in the fly-past. Now remember that the Mercurius formation had to break to the right thirty seconds after flying over the saluting base and then fly back along the same bearing to Langebaanweg. Thirty seconds was adhered to, but the turn began farther south than the point planned. Again, the higher speed also resulted in a wider turn than had been planned, and the leader had not made allowance for that by turning more steeply. The last, fatal error was in not maintaining visual contact with the ground. That would almost certainly have warned the leader that he was two miles west of his planned flight path and on a collision course with the mountain. The board of inquiry found that the disaster was caused by the leader of the Mercurius formation not maintaining visual contact with the ground, and during the flight in the clouds, making an error of judgement by turning too wide, which resulted in a collision with the slopes of Devils Peak.

Written by James Byrom Fields of Air

  • Mercurius 01: Maj MCdeG Genis, Capt DduP Lombard
  • Mercurius 02: Cmdt LAF Henning, Maj GJ Euvrard, Maj N Beetge (pax, 24 Sqn) Capt GN Snyman (pax, 24 Sqn)
  • Mercurius 03: Maj HHAMC Lomoral, Maj WA Prinsloo, Cpl RN Grobler (pax), L/Cpl E Hayes (pax), Pvt GH Wasserman (pax)  

I was also witness to the crash as we lived on Groote Schuur estate and remember the rattle of my bedroom window as they hit the mountain,the game guard refered to was my father who was first on the scene. There was a memorial service held at the Groote Kerk and we all had to attend,also the whole cabinet attended as they all knew the pilots.The general public had to stand outside the church.

Weeks later we all got a lecture from Oom Piet Ledlie on how to calculate the angle of bank for a rate one turn at different airspeeds.

Thanks to all who posted,it sure brought back the memories,how ever sad they may be. The names of the departed have brought back many memories. I had forgotten that George Euvrard died in this sad accident. I was also acquainted with Willa Prinsloo and Chris Genis. Maj. Lamoral was of Belgian origin, if I remember correctly. A very nice man and fine aviator who struggled to teach me formation flying (with a French accent, nogal).

Francois Joubert
fjoub@sun.ac.za
2009-08-22 18:52:32
497

Casper was at MLW (Mechanised Leadership Wing) with me at 1SAI. On the 11 October 1982, at Oshivello, during a familiarization with weapons used by PLAN. One of the soldiers pressed a button on a Russian grenade that exploded killing 4 soldiers.

  • Candidate Officer CASPER WILLEM JOHANNES GEUSTYN
  • Lance Corporal ALAN RODGER JONES
  • Lance Corporal JACOBUS THEODORUS MEYER
  • Lance Corporal EDGAR SYDNEY WESSELS
Doug Beveridge
dougbev@msn.com
2013-02-14 15:21:19
498Member of Sector 20 Comops, Rundu.nico Fourie
nicolaasfourie@yahoo.co.uk
2006-10-26 23:29:49
500MY ACCOUNTS ARE THAT THIS PERSON WAS KILLED IN AN AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT ON 14 JULY 1976 AT TINLEY MANOR BEACHJOHANN
JOHANNV@IHSJHB.CO.ZA
2007-04-19 14:59:59
500It was a SAAF Cessna 185A Skywagon serial number 712 that crashed with the loss of all four on board. Nick
starship@worldonline.co.za
2010-10-24 15:32:25
503

A Calamitous Incident

Alpha Company was detached for special duties in a terrorist hunting excercise with the Parachute Battalion to the rear of the Cape Town Highlander's position and north-east of Ondangwa, where mining of vehicle tracks had become a common feature. Tragically, late on 25th May, Sgt W.H.B. Gildenhuys, a 27-year-old weapons instructor of No 3 Platoon of the company, whose brother had served in the regiment and whose father and mother had been in the Navy and Airforce, died of wounds received in an extremely gallant attempt to save others when a rifle grenade exploded whilst they were on patrol. Rfn F.E. Eksteen, W.R. Hamber, R.J. Schonken and A.J. Rohlandt were all injured at the same time.

Sgt. Gildenhuys's body was flown back to Cape Town. He was a married man with a baby son, and was popular with everyone. Gildenhuys had been with the Cape Town Highlanders for more than ten years and had been bitterly disappointed at being medically turned down the previous year for service in Angola. At his full military funeral from St Andrew's Presbyterian Church on 30th May, Pipe-Major N. Mouton played the "Flowers of the Forest" lament and Bugler E. van der Spuy sounded the "Last Post" and "Reveille". In the desolate bush country where he had met his death his fellows commemorated his passing with a minute's silence.

He was posthumously awarded the Honoris Crux for his bravery.

Taken from the book "The Cape Town Highlanders, 1885 - 1985" by Niel Orpen, ISBN 0620095075, Page 84
John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2001-05-30 00:00:00
503

Accidentally Killed

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2002-01-16 16:16:40
504It was said that Gavin was killed in a Buffel accident, To this day I still do not know the true story..I would appreciate if anyone that was with him at the time could mail me and fill me in Brother Mark
mark.glinski@afrox.boc.com
2006-11-08 21:10:57
504Change of Email
mark@eurosteel.co.za
2008-01-16 13:32:53
504I barely knew my uncle, I was only 3. But I am proud to be associated with such a great person who is loved by so many. My prayers are with you uncle Gav.Brett Trojanowski
btrojanowski@barloworld-equipment.com
2008-02-07 15:02:24
508Crashed following mid-air collision with Piper Pa-31 Navajo ZS-KTX.

2003-09-30 20:10:46
508Crashed following mid-air collision with Piper Pa-31 Navajo ZS-KTX.

2003-09-30 20:11:04
508He was co-pilot to Capt J.I.T de Villiers and had F/Srg Annerie Niemand as their Air Hostess. 14 People died on that tragic day.

2003-09-30 20:38:05
508At the time I was an Air Force Policeman stationed at Swartkops. We were summoned to the scene of the accident near Erasmia and I had to stand guard, the whole night, at the Civy plane, which was on the top of the hill. Only when it got light the next morning, one could really comprehend the scale of the tragedy. What I saw is to gruesome to describe. The worst was the two kids, one lying face down and one face up. This is a picture I will never forget. The scene of the Merlin at the bottom of the hill was just as bad.Roelf de Bruyn
debruynroelf@gmail.com
2015-12-23 01:50:02
511

18 Sep 1970: 68408459N Private Abraham Jacobus Goosen from 1 Air Depot was accidentally killed in a crane accident at Voortrekkerhoogte. He was 17.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-19 00:25:01
513

Died in motor accident. He was in Sasol commando.



2003-11-15 12:50:32
516L/Cpl Gert Gauche of 1 Parachute Bn died in a Buffel accident near Otavi whilst en-route to a reported farm farm attack. He was the son of a cattle farmer from Hluhluwe in Northern Natal and I was in the vehicle in which he tragically lost his life so close to the end of his 2 year service. Dave O Connor
aoc@regis.co.za
2015-09-11 12:36:34
516L/Cpl Gert Gauche of 1 Parachute Bn died in a Buffel accident near Otavi whilst en-route to a reported farm farm attack. He was the son of a cattle farmer from Hluhluwe in Northern Natal and I was in the vehicle in which he tragically lost his life so close to the end of his 2 year service. Dave O Connor
aoc@regis.co.za
2015-09-11 12:38:09
519sappers cleared the road for a buffel convoy, did not pick up cheesemine.buffel in which Gouws travel went over mine, his head hit the rollbar of the buffel.He was declared brain dead.

2007-08-30 21:07:08
523Rfn Ari Greyling was killed on 16th December 1979 along with Mannetjies Fourie in a fierce gun and mortar battle lasting approximately 20 minutes.  There was nothing we could do for him as he had been shot and a mortar landed on his back.  He died with a bible in his shirt pocket.  I will always remember him fondly, he was a good guy and he even lied us Souties.  I remember him killing and cutting up a locals goat when we got so hungry.  The meat was still warm when we put it on the fire ... without salt it was awful, but the butcher job he did was awesome.  RIP Buddy ...Mark McKay
Yankeezulu53565@yahoo.com
2012-02-14 14:37:36
524Frik Greyling was an amazing section leader, Alpha Company platoon 1, section 2. His skills in the bush, on patrol, was exceptional, never took chances and had an amazing sense of map reading and direction finding. He had a cunning sense of humour, and was liked by all his peers. I remember that fateful day in the ops room at Etengwa base, northeast of Okangwati, as if it happened yesterday. May you have eternal rest, Frik. I salute you and will never forget.Frank Rens
frankrens@lonmin.com
2017-02-14 03:47:33
525

Hannes was killed in action in SWA, on 12 August 1978, whilst on hot pursuit of a terorist group of about 45 men strong. He died together with two other paratroopers, Pierre Du Bois and Corrie vd Nest. A mortar bomb detonated between him and Corrie killing both.

Hannes was up and out of cover lifting the radio from his back so that he could call for a strike when he took the hit. He was a quiet decent man, with exceptional vasbyt!

"come and stand by your glass and be ready,
here is a toast to the men of the skies,
here is a toast to the one dead already
and a toast to the next one to die..."

Dave
daveh@intekom.co.za
2008-12-11 07:41:56
525

I was at his military funeral in Wepener and can still remember the singing of the workers from the Greyling family farm at the graveside. It was a day of sincere grief for all present - fellow Parabats, friends and family. I acted as driver for Col Archie Moore OC after the service and well remember his anguish at the death of this young man and good soldier.

JG
jgeyser@telkomsa.net
2009-10-26 08:00:29
525I remember this as if it was yesterday. I was a medic, 19 years old, at the Ondangwa Air Base that day, and we tried so hard ...Hein Erasmus
heinerasmus@xtra.co.nz
2010-09-25 12:18:05
527

So ver bekend aan my was Sktr. Griesel lid van die Goudveld Kommando. Op 6 Januarie 1983 was Sktr. Griesel saam met 7 ander lede van die Goudveld Kommando op n roetiene patrollie toe hul voertuig n landmyn in die Kaokoveld in die Noord-Westelike operasionele gebied afgetrap het. Sktr. Griesel is op slag oorlede saam met vyf van sy makkers. Twee het die oorspronklike aanval oorleef maar is die volgende dag aan hul wonde oorlede.



2001-07-18 22:17:43
527

As ek kan reg onhou is hy nie opslag oorlede nie hy is oppad na die hospitaal in vliegtuig oorlede. Ek dink ook sy van is verkeurd gespel (Griessel).

Hy is in Welkom begrawe. 5 van hulle is op die selfde dag bymekaar begrawe. Twee van hulle was my nefies (Griessel) + (VAN DER MERWE)

ANSIE GRIESSEL
ansie69@bigpond.com.au
2009-06-23 02:13:50
528

Died in a Military Vehicle Accident, involving his section being transported in a Gladiator. There was a bad crash and fire, with the troops trapped in the rear. The army vehicle he was in collided head-on with a newspaper delivery van between Colesberg and Philippolis, on their way back to Ladysmith army camp.

Ralph McLean
ralph@southafricawargraves.org
2009-07-09 20:09:39
528

13 Sep 1970: Six members from 5 SAI and one member from 3 SAI were killed while being transported in a Gladiator Troop Carrier back to Ladysmith Army Camp. Their vehicle was involved in a head-on collision with a Newspaper Delivery Van between Colesburg and Philippolis and the vehicle immediately burst into flames with the men still trapped inside.

The casualties were:

241
66458696N Rifleman Hilton Dudley Coker (3 SAI). He was 19.
528
65395287N Rifleman John Grinyer (5 SAI). He was 20.
808
6732700N Rifleman Peter Alfons Ernst Leonhardt (5 SAI). He was 19.
853
68238567N Rifleman Kevin Eric Mack (5 SAI). He was 18.
903
68444918N Rifleman Richard Neville Marriott (5 SAI). He was 17.
1088
68222322N Rifleman Gregory George Olyott (5 SAI). He was 18.
1448
68307446N Rifleman Mark Felice Vallero (5 SAI). He was 18.
John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2014-09-13 10:18:05
530F/Sgt Grobler was one of the three SAAF crew members of a SA-330C Puma helicopter, # 132, transporting men from 1 Parachute Battalion, when his helicopter was shot down by enemy 23 mm AA fire south-east of Cuvelai in Angola, crashing inverted. None of the Parabats or SAAF crew survived. Peter
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2007-12-31 04:48:15
530

I was a platoon commander at 32Bn and flew in this aircraft about 30 minutes before it was shot down.  It was an older L-model Puma helicopter as I recall and I joked with Grobler about flying in "this old aircraft", to which he jokingly responded that he was going to beat me up for insulting his chopper.  It flew as the last Puma in the formation of eight when it transported our company, but moved to the fifth position when it transported A Coy, 1 Para later that afternoon.  It was shot down by saturated fire of several 14,5mm weapons, which we took from the enemy the following day.  RIP

Frans van Staden
frans@peoplewise.co.za
2010-01-28 20:40:12
532My Moeder was 16 jaar oud toe sy met Johann Adam Roos Grobler getroud. Uit die Huwelik was hul Seun Henk Grobler gebore. My Moeder het Johann Grobler (Bill) verlaat toe Henk 2jr oud was. Omdat sy eerste huis verlaat het het die hof daai tyd Henk aan sy pa versorg. My moeder het vir baie jare saam my eie pa geveg om Henk op te spoor. My moeder het toe Henk in die weermag was n oproep van sy niggie gekry om te se hulle probeer solank om haar op te spoor want Henk is op soek na haar. Dit was n Sondag wat sy die oproep ontvang het en Hulle het gereel Henk so oor 2 weke van daardie sondag Pas kry en dan sal hul mekaar ontmoet. maar die woensdag voor hy op pas moes gaan is hy oorlede. My moeder is ook nou al in 2012 oorlede en ek weet sy en Henk is weer bymekaar. Lizet van Staden
vanstadenlizet@gmail.com
2017-03-05 04:13:44
533

A young speedy winger by the name of Renier Grobler had a phenomenal rise to Bok colours in 1969. He made his debut when Northern Transvaal beat the 1969 Australians 13-3 and scored a try. He would play two more games for N.TVL and scored a try in the 1969 Currie Cup final against WP at Loftus. That match is fondly remembered for Frik du Preez's "gedrop, geplace en gescore" exploits. The public questioned Grobler's selection, citing inexperience. He gave a good account of himself on tour and was not overawed by the task at hand.

The following year, a series of injuries kept him out of the N.TVL team and in 1971 he was slowly working his way up through the N.TVL B side. On the day 26 May 1971, the touring 1971 French side ripped apart W.TVL 50-0 in Potchefstroom, Grobler a corporal in the SAAF, was a passenger in one of three SAAF Hawker-Siddeley HS -125 (code named Mercurius). 

The SAAF were doing a practice run for the 10th anniversary Republic Day Celebrations in Cape Town and due to low clouds around Rhodes Memorial, the three executive jets slammed into the mountain at high speeds killing all eleven men. Remnants of that crash still remain, but tragically "Rysmier" Grobler was lost to South African rugby forever.

Anon
tonja@ningalooreefdive.com
2011-09-02 11:12:47
534

Wallie was 'n 5 SAI seksie leier wat in Elundu gestasioneer was. Hy was baie goed en moes die laaste keer saam met ons uitgaan voor hy na Vryburg sou vertrek om met die liefde van sy lewe te trou. Ons was in totaal 17 lede wat 'n groep van ongeveer 90 van SWAPO se bestes moes gaan afsny.

Kort voor ons vlug het hy aan my vertel dat die Here die vorige nag vir hom gewys het dat hy dit nie gaan maak nie. Ons het saam gebid tot voor ons vlug. Toe ons later die oggend op die spore van 'n meter breed en ongeveer 7 cm diep afkom, Het die Pel Bev. Clive Logan panniekerig geraak en groot taktiese foute gemaak.

Wallie was voor my op sy fosforgranaat geskiet. Ons was oppad om die ander wat binne die L hinderlaag vasgepen was te gaan help.

Lukas Swart
lukas@akska.co.za
2007-01-12 23:01:27
535

A.S. Groenewald was killed along with his brother and two others when their Ratel 20 APC was hit by ZSU23mm fire during the battle with the 59th Brigade on the 12th February 1988, Operation Hooper.

Great guys who I served with in 1SAI, Bloemfontein 1987.



2002-04-26 15:24:21
535

AS Groenewald was killed with his nephew Pieter, Lance Corporal Kleinhans and Rfn van Nieuwenhuizen at about 17h00 on 14 February 1988. Their Ratel got stuck on a treestump that was left in the tanktrack in front of us. When their ratel got stuck, Corporal Kleinhans got on our Ratel 22A and rode with me until we got to the shona before the attack. 22C then caught up and the Corporal left for his ratel.

About half an hour later we heard that 22C was shot out. It was shot on the left-hand by a ZSU 23-4, but on the right-hand where the Groenewalds sat, a big hole was ripped out of the Ratel. There were two more Groenewalds in the Ratel, the driver and another rifleman. The other rifleman was also seriously wounded in his neck from the shots. The two that were killed were the MAG gunner team.

They were very dear friends, we started army together in Alpha Company 1 SAI and in 2nd phase went to Bravo Company and then to Bravo at 61 Mech.

That day made that Valentine's day will never be the same. One always thinks back to the friends who died that day, the sunset as we drove back, with smoke dwindling upwards and bombs still exploding

Hannes Lombaard
alpha@internext.co.za
2007-12-04 13:38:55
537 02 Sep 1982: Two members from 5 Maintenance Unit were grievously burned in an accidental petrol explosion at Ondangwa on 30 August 1982. Both members were evacuated to 1 Military Hospital Burn Unit where they succumbed to their injuries on 02 September 1982. Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-04 05:21:20
538

P. Groenewald was killed along with his brother and two others when their Ratel 20 APC was hit by ZSU-23mm fire during the battle with the 59th Brigade on the 12th February 1988, Operation Hooper.

Great guys who I served with in 1SAI, Bloemfontein 1987.



2002-04-26 15:23:03
538

Pietie was one of the nicest guys one could ever hope to meet, especially in Angola where he always made you feel better about everything. He came and gave me my post on the morning of 13th of Feb. The next day, 23A, my Ratel was called to assist the stricken Ratel. Henk de Koker and myself carried the wounded to our Ratel, then Henk ran back again into enemy fire to retrieve the burning from 22C.



2003-02-24 12:32:09
538

Pieter Groenewald was killed with his nephew AS Groenewald, Lance Corporal Kleinhans and Rfn van Nieuwenhuizen at about 17h00 on 14 February 1988.

Their Ratel got stuck on a treestump that was left in the tanktrack in front of us. When their ratel got stuck, Corporal Kleinhans got on our Ratel 22A and rode with me until we got to the shona before the attack. 22C then caught up and the Corporal left for his Ratel. About half an hour later we heard that 22C was shot out. It was shot on the left-hand by a ZSU23-4, but on the right-hand where the Groenewalds sat, a big hole was ripped ou of the Ratel. There were two more Groenewalds in the Ratel, the driver and another rifleman. The other rifleman was also seriously wounded in his neck from the shots. The two that were killed were the MAG gunner team. They were very dear friends, we started army together in Alpha Company 1SAI and in 2nd phase went to Bravo Company and then to Bravo at 61 Mech.

That day made that Valentine's day will never be the same. One always thinks back to the friends who died that day, the sunset as we drove back, with smoke dwindling upwards and bombs still exploding.

Hannes Lombaard
alpha@internext.co.za
2007-12-04 13:40:34
539He was 29years of age.Major Lukas Grundling jumped from the plane before his troops, at Wepener, FreeState, SouthAfrica.  It was degrees below zero.  He landed in a farm dam.  Military Court Cases never revealed the exact reason for his death. His family was simply told that he "drowned".  Then again "heart failure from the icy dam" was blamed for his death.  Foul play was suspected. He was survived by his wife Annatjie and three daughters Luanica,Esme,Leonie. Daughter Leonie was reported missing by Knysna Police in Oct2008. I know that Lukas would find her!!    Esme Grundling
edejager@dominic.co.za
2011-06-30 14:02:24
539The roll of honor is about my father, not the idiot Leonie.
The only invitation I want,  is to my mother, Annatjie's, funeral, unless that has already happen.  I have had to learn not to need or depend,  or want family so;  I have zero.  Luanica Grundling.

Luanica Grundling
lulu@chevalint.com
2011-07-01 10:44:32
53907 Sep 1978: 65658270PE Major Lukas Gerhardus Grundling from 1 Parachute Battalion was accidentally drowned at Wepener during a daylight jump with full kit in the early hours of the morning at the start of D Companies Conventional training. He landed in the deep end of a farm dam and became entangled with his kit rope and with the prevailing wind, the chute dragged him under the water. Although he did surface a few times screaming for assistance, by the time help arrived, he had already drowned. He was 29.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-07 00:07:51
542Pieter was a soldier in 4 Recce. He died in a parachute accident during a hi-lo training exercise. Whilst approaching the side door of a dakota, his emergency chute apparently opened by itself and shot out the door. The chute pulled him into the side of the door and the tail, apparently killing him instantly. In the days before the accident he had three roman candles (malfunctions) in a row, and he told me (his brother) that he thinks its a sign. The morning of the jump he had planned to meet with the OC of the base to resign, but chose to go on the exercise instead. After his death no member of his family was allowed to see his corpse, and informal reports from a medic in the unit claims he was alive when found and both his chutes deployed. No official explanation was given for the accident. Pieter was 21 at the time of his death and is buried in Langebaan cemetrie.
Johannes Haasbroek
joe@iway.na
2012-03-12 04:07:48
548

Ons was lede van Echo Kompanie, 8 SAI. In die weermag het ons nie eerste name gebruik nie, net vanne. Hanekom was die tiepe van ou met wie almal oor die weg gekom het. Uitgaande persoonlikheid wat hom nie met nonsens opgehou het nie.

Ons basis was Ciete(spelling?), so 50km binne Angola. Ons was besig met eerste fase operasies vir Ops Askari. Dit laat oggend was toe ons die nuus kry dat (Pierre) Hanekom gesneuwel het. En dit was net 'n week of so voor ons eerste Grensfase oor was, en ons vir Kersfees terug 'States' toe gegaan het op pas. Ek het sy ouers die jammerste gekry, want ek kon net dink wat se skok dit was, so kort voor pas en Kersfees.

Mnr. en Mev. Hanekom, as julle meer wil weet oor wat gebeur het, kontak my asseblief by bg. email adres.

Marius van Niekerk
Auckland
Nieu Zeeland
Marius van Niekerk
mariusvn@paradise.net.nz
2003-02-25 11:37:14
550

18 Sep 1979: 76334911BG Corporal AP Hanneman from Northern Transvaal Command was killed in a Military Vehicle Accident at Potgietersrus. He was 19.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-19 00:34:47
553

15 Sep 1984: 81056012BG Rifleman Otto Bismarck Harms was accidentally killed at Germiston when he was struck by a moving train. He was 19.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-16 05:01:12
55401217066PE Kol D B Harmse Died 29th October 1975 during Operation SavannahMark Goller
markantgol@gmail.com
2015-07-03 06:54:32
557

29 Sep 1990: 83319236BG Rifleman B Hart from 6 SAI was killed in a Military Vehicle Accident on Beit Bridge Road while traveling towards the Vhembe Base. He was 23.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-30 11:39:23
559

This was my brother Abraham Hattingh. He mtriculated at Glencoe Technical High School in 1977. The next year he was called up for service. He died on 7 February 1978 in the Army Base in Potchefstroom. They were busy cleaning the barracks when the lightning struck the electric polisher. He was busy polishing the floor at that moment. He died on the sceen. He died a month before his 18th birthday. He was laid to rest in Witbank with a full military burial.

He is still very much missed by his father and two sisters.

Susan Grobler 083 717 8112 P.O. Box 13214 MIDDELBURG 1050

Susan Grobler

2003-09-11 11:26:29
565

21 Sep 1966: 55404 Able Seaman Phillipus Johannes Havenga from SAS Simonsberg was killed in a diving training accident in False Bay. He was 20.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-21 12:46:36
566

A man who gave his life for his family, friends and country. He gave his best to the end, never considering himself, dedicated to the brave service he delivered upon all!

A true hero, you live through your son ... a dedicated young man with his father's soul (a picture of you inside and out).

Admirer
admirer@lantic.net
2007-03-27 12:39:32
566Pappa, Dis vandag Pappa se verjaarsdag, en ek wens en verlang met my hele hart dat ek vanoggend vir pappa n stywe drukkie kon gee en vir pappa kon se; Gelukkige verjaarsdag, en dat liewe Jesus pappa nog lank vir ons almal moet spaar. Ek wens ek kon vir pappa se hoe lief ek pappa het, en hoe baie ek verlang! Ek wens ek kon weer op pappa se skoot sit as ek nie lekker voel en weet dat pappa alles sal beter maak. Pappa, jy is en sal altyd my held bly, en die grootste wens van my hart is dat pappa en Wynand net vir een dag bymekaar kon wees, pappa sou regtig so trots op pappa se seun gewees het. Hy verdien om na pappa vernoem te word! Pappa, ek is en sal ook altyd baie lief wees vir pappa en ek verlang elke dag van my lewe na pappa. Ek weet pappa is op n beter plek, en dat ons almal (mamma, pappa, Adele, ek en Wynand) weer eendag bymekaar sal wees. Ek bere pappa in n baie spesiale gedeelte van my hart, waar niemand my herinneringe kan wegvat nie. Pappa se klein dogtertjie vir altyd, Lizelle XXX Lizelle Hawkins
ablebrokers@telkomsa.net
2007-05-22 10:02:10
566

Sersant Wynand Jacobus Hawkins: Wynand het in 1977 by die lugmag brandweer aangesluit na 4 jaar by die Pretoria Brandweer, en as korporaal na Langebaan verhuis waar hy vir 2 jaar gestationeer was. Einde 1977 meld hy aan vir Grens Diens te Grootfontein. Hy het bevordering ontvang tot Sersant in 1978, en ontvang die Honoris Crux vir dapperheid.

In 1979 word hy verplaas na Devon, en einde 1979 meld hy weer aan by Grootfontein. 1981 word Sersant Hawkins weer verplaas na Waterkloof Lugmag Basis, en lewer weer grens diens in 1983 by Omega Basis.

Op 21 Mei 1985 is hy oorlede in 'n brand by die Sasol Depot in Pretoria Wes.

"Hy was 'n godvresende man en het 'n hart van goud gehad. Wynand was 'n wonder man vir my en 'n goeie pa vir sy 2 dogters op daardie stadium. Niks was ooit te veel vir hom nie, hy was baie behulpsaam en 'n geliefde persoon. Sy oorlede pa het altyd gese "Jy is my tjom, my beste tjom in die wereld"."

Kirsten Hawkins

2007-05-18 14:11:00
566

Vir n beter Pa sou ek nie kon vra. Met my geboorte, en elke mylpaal in my jong lewe, tot koffie in die bed was hy daar vir my en aan my ma se sy. Pa was soms streng, maar regverdig. Saam het ma en pa my geleer van liefde, respek en eerbied vir mekaar, en vir God.

Pa was altyd reg met n grappie of twee, veral met Ouma en Oupa Hawkins! Ons het baie daar gekuier en gebraai. Dit was Pa se lewe. Hy het altyd baie liefde en wedersydse respek teenoor sy ouers getoon.

My pa moes baie weg gaan grens toe, dan was sy klossie (my bynaam) baie siek, sommer vir dae aaneen. Ek het altyd geweet hy kom terug met ietsie mooi vir my.

Toe Lizelle gebore is, was pa baie trots. Ons was 'n gesinnetjie van vier. Maar diep in sy hart het hy gehinker na 'n seun ook, min wetend dat hy wel eendag sy seun sou kry!

Pa was n man van durf en daat. Een aand is ons almal saam geroep en die nuus gekry, dat ons 'n boetie of sussie gaan kry, ons was so opgewonde! Pa was so trots, en ons het gewag en gewag.

Tot daardie tragiese dag. Ek is by die skool kom haal, en ma het gese "my bokkie jy moet sterk wees", en ek wou weet waar my pa is? ek het net geweet. Verder het alles net te vinnig gebeur. Almal het net gese dit was 'n ongeluk, hy het onherkenbaar verbrand. Ek moet hom onthou soos hy was! Ek mag hom nie gesien het nie, ek kon nie afskeid neem nie. Dit was te veel vir my!! Die begrafnis was vol milkier. Brandweerwaens, kanonskote, en almal wat eerbiedig afskeid neem van 'n geliefde vriend, eggenoot en pappa. Als het gevoel of dit tot stilstand gekom het. In die kort tydjie wat ek gehad he tom hom as my pa te ken, was hy my held!

Adele (Hawkins) Koen

2007-05-18 14:40:48
566Vir die gene wat nie reeds die verhaal van Sersant Wynand Hawkins ken nie: Soos sy dogters hom beskryf; n Man van durf en daad se Adele, en n Pa wat als beter kon beter maak onthou Lizelle. Sy vrou het hom geken as n man wat die lewe vierkantig in die oe kon staar, vir geen oomblik sou terugdeins, maar altyd Godvresend bly staan het. Hierdie man het sy lewe op die spel geplaas om ander te dien, sy land, sy gesin en familie, maar ook sy naaste. Sy nederigheid is net n wonder, want met die inbors van n kryger, en die hand en hart van n seun, pa en eggenoot is dit die kombinasie wat jy selde indien ooit sou teekom. Wynand Jacobus Hawkins is in Pretoria gebore, sy Pa het hom as beste vriend en seun geken. Vandag nog dink sy Ma met tere herinnering aan haar geliefde seun wat soveel vreugde en trots aan hul besorg het. Van sy dae as skool seun aan Laerskool Tuinrand, tot sy Hoerskool loopbaan by Tuine was Wynand doelgerig en wou hy reeds brandweerman word. So het Wynand se loopbaan ontluik tot hy na Waterkloof Basis verplaas is, en die oggend van 21 Mei 1985 van sy gesin afskeid geneem het met die woorde SIEN JOU MORE OGGEND. Die ontploffing by Sasol in Pretoria Wes het die Pathfinder binne sekondes in vlamme gehul en uitgebrand. Sersant Hawkins, Kpl. Clenche en Lugman Knoetze het in die ontploffing gesterf. 25 Mei 1985 is hy in die Nuwe Helde Akker in Pretoria begrawe. Sersant Hawkins het 12 jaar sy lewe gewaag, sy dogters en vrou agtergelaat, maar ook sy ongebore seun waarvoor hul gewag het. Vandag leef die herinnering aan Sersant Wynand Hawkins voort, deur sy dogters, maar ook in besliste tred deur sy seun Wynand Hawkins Jnr. Rene Ludick

2007-05-22 14:27:37
568

Gavin John Harvey was a drummer boy, a child of peace and born with the gift of incredible humour. He ignited laughter wherever he went. His impersonations were spot on, and always a twist to the story. He loved music. He lived for it. It was he who introduced me to Stevie Wonder, Frank Zappa, Chick Corea, The Brecker Bro's... we made a band in high school with Martin Yates, a talented boy of muso parents, who was Gavin's best friend... they indulged my love of ballads and strong melodies and lyrics. All Gavin really wanted to do was to be a muso. In another time and space, that's what he would've been. But The Call-Up hung over his head. First he'd work at the Std Bank for 6 months then join the July Call-up, to fill those inbetween days of waiting.

It was 5 years later that i would write a song with Barney Simon from the Market Theater, entitled 'O Pale Ladies of South Africa'... cos I know that the white women of SA were complicit in condoning the call-ups. My revolutionary urge was to do anything to avoid it, even as I hear my mother say to my brother, who didn't want to go... "But it'll make a man out of you Neil!!!" What kind of a man, Mom? Broken? 'Pale Ladies' was a call to all the wives, the girlfriends, the sisters the oumas to present themselves instead, at the stations, where the trains would wait for the cargo of cannon fodder, our beautiful unknowing boys...we should dress all frilly and feminine...and see what would happen...what could they do? would they take us instead? can you see the power of the meek... it would be a peaceful protest of Gandhi-esque proportions. Obedience in a culture such as ours can be a dangerous thing. Look at how Nazi Germany evolved, whilst the intellectuals dismissed Hitler as a buffoon...just like PW. Alice Miller writes about poisonous paedagogy. We all were taught, from within the marrow of the school systems, to hate and fear the communists and the blacks, out there in the townships..also 'communists'... A few rebellious crazy ones, sometimes consequentially so, would become heroic in their protest. There was little trustworthy to rely on in those days... dark days of censorship and lies...

So Gavin went to Bloem, and none were more surprised than me, to hear he was VOLUNTEERING FOR THE BATS!! I can only think that something radically shifted for Gavin, during basics... the taste for heroism... or maybe a kind of reckless madness for the inevitable, maybe he volunteered just to see if he could do it, for an entirely insporty and non-competitive guy, this was a madness indeed. and then again, maybe he just had a dream to fly.... we had been lovers. he was tender and smelt of blue stratos and sometimes brandy and behind his glasses were green eyes that were wise and kind... and we loved music. we really loved the music together, and the first time we made love it was in his bedroom, squashed on his narrow bed, the moonlight shimmering on the silver of his drums, and Stevie crooning.. 'i don't wanna bore you with it...bit i love you, i love you, i lo-o-o-ve you..."

I went to University, it was a big and fantastic move for me- freedom, at last, from the stifling control of home. we wrote many many letters. they would arrive in blue envelopes, on the hostel notice board. they smelt of what i didn't recognise. but filled with pages of blue ink anecdotes and jokes and some endearments, not much really. and I waited... he hitched from Bloem to Grahamstown to visit me one weekend. I smuggled him into my room. It was 2 days of simple and sweet intimacy, we brewed gluwein with my element and slept close as we'd ever been. we fitted together, in the wordlessness, and the wonder of being naked, for one whole night, together, and there, somehow, our worlds met, in time's suspension. ..no future and a distant past. he seemed proud of his wings, about to go to the Border. The Wings were a big thing. he became animated and his eyes shone when he spoke of them.. To the Border... we couldn't talk politics. we chose not to. I was a radical lefty then already in trouble for some of the articles i had written for the student paper.

When he left, I told my mom, during her Sun evening telephone call to me, of his visit. she was outraged that he had stayed in my room. she withdrew her permission for me to leave the residence the next year. Maybe she had hoped I was still a virgin. it didn't matter. I would relocate to Cape Town University, for their specialised Drama degree. at the end of first year, I couldn't wait any longer ... I met Alf, who was actually gay, but I didn't know then, and I told Gavin it was over. I was heady with a new romance, and how would it work over the massive distance, and my new life, my new exciting drama-queen life? I can't really say how it affected him. He stopped writing. I know it hurt him...now, when I look back, I can see the inevitability of it, for me and him. My road was drawing me to very different places...and him?

The news that came to me, via a call to Cape Town, in my second year of study, that he was in 1 Military Hospital in a coma, after being flown down from Angola.. flown down from Angola. The story was they had been travelling in a Buffel when they hit a landmine. The shrapnel entered his lung. That was the story. This was about 4 weeks before he was to klaar out, and just after his 21st birthday. I wanted to go to Pta. I was in the middle of a series of excrutiating improvisations toward the production of Marat Sade, directed by Prof Mavis Taylor. Contracted in her own agony of rheumatoid arthritis, she refused me permission to go. I made a tape of songs to play for him, and poems and words to call him somehow, back to us...to me? The cassette never arrived in Pta. And I, well I am ashamed to say, I was not courageous enough then, to disobey instructions and travel to Pta without permission. I would have forfeited my entrance to the exams. i was a bursary student, finances were precarious...a million justifications. Fact is, I didn't and if I had...who knows? who knows?

His last letter arrived unexpectedly in our little flat in Hope St, me living with my new boyfriend, in those last weeks before the accident. Very strange letter. Little communicated, as everything was scrutinised by Big Brother, but there were 2 cartoons : one of a small dog, weeping by a gravestone saying RIP Gavin John Harvey..and something else. I need to find the letters again to get the whole story. and also a reference to the craziness of being up there. someone had put the head of a kitten on someone elses' cushion.. things were not so good. it was not a good time, up there.

It was a trip into the extremities of barbarism and man's inhumanity towards man...in the bloody ruthless and ignoble pursuit of the diamond mines and rich reserves of Angola. and our best and most gifted of young men were systematically being offered as slaughter...and slaughterers. you were powerless to do much about it when you were there. the zeitgeist was impenetrable: Jump when you had to, Run when you had to, Shoot when you had to, Kill when you had to, Hide when you had to and fuckin' keep your ears and eyes awake all the time. No time for dreamless sleep and the unspeakble horror of what you saw an undertone. Always try keep calm and believe you would get back.. and shit yourself because you were so scared, not just at what was the invisible, scent of them beyond, but what was happening in the eyes of those around you. and the face that stares back at you in the piece of broken glass.

Iin the end, I think he'd just had enough..emotionally...he had transgressed his own borders, and how in God's name was he to put it all back together when he got home? How would he ever talk about it/ tell us even one of the stories that blister on your lips in the naming? He chose to klaar out big time...take the Big Step... I am sure he is still around, when I write I can hear his voice dictating this. His mom and dad really suffered. Grieved for their youngest beloved boy. It was unspeakable that this should happen. It wasn't part of the plan, and that is why I think this is such an amazing space you have created John Dovey. We, in some way, through telling the stories and posting the dedications are able to re-construct and honour... within a much bigger context. Our own gestures toward re-membering and forgiving what was a terrible price paid for the madness of war.

God bless Us All
God bless Africa
God Bless Her People
May She know Peace
May She know Prosperity
May She know Freedom from Suffering
May She know Forgiveness

Amen

Jennifer Ferguson
janifa@netactive.co.za
2007-11-02 16:50:20
568To Garvie Harves, as we affectionately knew him. Was one of my best friends, jeez, did we laugh together! I cant thank him enough for asking his mom if I could move in (twice) when the turmoil of my home life was just too much to bear. Gavin, you gave me laughter, friendship, and showed me a "can do" attitude that I still try to allude to. When you died, something changed in me, I cant still figure out what, but I hope it was for the better. 

Thanks for the gigs, the laughs, and your caring. 
Martin Yates
martin.yates1@gmail.com
2011-10-13 14:41:34
568I remember Gavin as a person who made you laugh, even at the most impossible of times. Even after 31 years I still remember him!!!!!!! Andrew S Chivers
andrew.c@gmail.com
2012-03-11 06:59:35
578

Clinton was killed in Angola near Cuito and he was a Bombardier in the Anti-Aircraft SAM-7 team unit of 61 Mech.

Martin Jonker
martin.jonker@standardbank.co.za
2006-05-26 21:26:47
578

Good day John,

I would like to know if anybody ever sent you a photo of my brother. I only have photos of him as a child. So, please should you have a grave (or any other) photo of him please forward it to me.

Best regards
Jenny
Jenny Reichel
jennifer.reichel@za.elster.com
2008-11-24 14:28:03
581

On 20 May 1983, the MK (ANC) Special Operations Unit planted a car bomb in Church Street, Pretoria, outside the building housing the administrative headquarters of the South African Air Force. The explosion killed twenty-one people  (eleven of whom were employees of the SAAF and two of whom were MK operatives) and injured 217. Commandant Izak Jacobus Henning was one of those killed.

Peter Chapman
chappiep@hotmail.com
2006-03-07 03:56:11
585

17 Sep 1962: P/2933 Warrant Officer Class 1 Johannes Jacobus Squier Heunis from 91 Ammunition Depot Suffered a fatal heart attack while in Pretoria. He was 45.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-17 14:03:28
586

Killed in Action (Tank took out Ratel)

4th January 1984

Niel Wiid
niel@systemiclogic.net
2009-10-24 12:18:08
588Lt Hind was a troop commander in "C-Squadron", 61 MECH BN GRP. He was fataly wounded on 3 October 1987 when his Rattel 90 was hit by a 100mm round fired from a Russian T55 tank. The projectile skipped off the muddy ground and went into the turret of his vehicle. His gunner and driver was also wounded in this battle of Cuito Cuanavale but later recovered

2002-05-15 17:28:51
588One our bloodiest battles. I was positioned at the 7 o'clock 50-100m behind 33 Charlie,Adrians Ratel 90, in 30 bevels ratel. He was in the process of laying down fire and getting ready to "wissel" position.Earlier he had reported seeing a tank and im sure this is what he was firing at. His driver Glen Woodhouse was about to back up when the left front side exploded in front of the wheel. the blast went upward and into the ratel, almost directly in front of Adrians position in the left turret,, exposing him to the full blast. Glen also took some of the blast, and Stompie the gunner could only have received minor cuts, as he bailed out the right turret confused and came hurdling past our vehicle with what looked like missing fingers, as he tried to keep it still and kept looking at it. I briefly informed our Capt. Cloete of the situation as he was talking to HQ command somewhere behind us. I dont think he heard,so i ordered my driver forward to 33C ,as the gunner and officer were still in the motionless vehicle. At that point i saw Adrian dismounting the turret from the left side,fall to the ground, get up walk toward the ystervark only 20 meters or so left of his position, but fell again.Before we pulled up left and behind 33c, i noticed Glen appear around the back right side of his ratel, very dissoriented and tried to find the water spout to the vehicles left water tank.Apparently he could not get out of the hatch above him as the turret was covering it, so he pulled himself through the turret and out the right side door. Our sqaudron was still in full contact ,with mortar,tank ,heavy and small weapons fire exploding everywhere,i could hear schrapnel pinging of the sides of our vehicle and chipping pieces of the glass through the viewing ports.As we were approaching, i opened our right side door and bailed out rushing towards Glen who now had decided to plonk himself down right there next to his ratel.At first glance i could barely make out his face as the whole right side was covered with blood. I yelled at him to get up(knowing how tall and big he was)so i could get under his shoulder and guide him back to our vehicle.he was clearly in bad shape as i struggled to hold his weight and stagger in that typical thick angola sand. as we approached our rightside door Jaque De Wet , my driver was holding the hydrolics to the door, i shoved Glen into the tight space inside that door so Jaque could close it and clammberd over Glen to get to the back where i had stashed a bunch of bandages and dressings. The stench of blood was nausiating as i tendended to Glens wounds,blood was spraying everywhere as he panicked for air claiming he couldnt breath. As he reached for the gun ports to open them i noticed his blood soaked hands were missing all their fingers and blood kept pumping out all over the ports making his hands slip off the handels. he was oozing blood from neck wounds,mouth and nose,his ear eye and eye socket were missing , so i quickly covered these and his hands and wrapped them with bandages, all the time he was gasping for air and panicking that he couldnt breath. i turned to Jaque and told him to speed it up,at this point he was already reversing while being directed by Cpt.Cloete and gunner Wiied. i think at one point we actually got bogged on a tree stump Jaque had to try several times to rock the vehicle off. We eventually made it back to the medic unimog and dropped Glen off for further attention.Minutes later he cassually came down the ramp and proceeded to pee right there in front of all of us and then casually walk back into the unimog.He must have got a very good dose of morphine!!! Our laughter was suddenly interrupted by the roar of a mig 23 as it flew directly over us literally tree top height, and we found ourselves mouths wide open staring into the flaming black ass with red stars underside, so close you could feel the heat from that single fiery jet engine.Reality set in and we were ready to roll on again!! I never heard or saw Stompie or Glen again Glen was an avid motocross bike rider.Cpl. Brad Saunders
Brad@swmedical.com
2008-12-02 20:33:37
588my crew comamander,to this day i regret for leaving you in our ratel.i know you paid the ultimate sacrifice;but it was your command discipline in our vechile that saved my life.i do believe god our father saved life that day when i ran in between the bullets.how not one bullet hit me is a miracle in itself.thank you for the faith you had in me as your gunner.also thank-you for all christian faith you installed in me,even thou at times,i was mighty drunk.god has removed the alcohol from life for the past 10 years now.so lond my friend till we meet again.stompie
gschmidtplumbers@telkomsa.net
2009-01-02 16:37:02
589Hi John.

His first name was Douglas. He was born in Zambia. He went to school in Pietersburg. According to his dad, he was shot whilst driving in the border region. He had just taken over from his driver when this happened. I am trying to track down his sister.
Jimmy Mattushek
jdkarsa@yahoo.com.au
2011-05-04 14:48:09
589

One of the earliest memories of my life was the story my Dad told me about Dougie Hinds, when I was a little boy and my Dad returned from the Border... Up to this day, my father has told us almost nothing about his times on the Border, hence the fact that the story of Dougie made such an impact on me that I still remember it to this day! In short, my father John Hartslief, served with Dougie on the Border. Both of them were Lt's at the time. If memory serves me right, Dougie and his men was on patrol just ahead of my father's patrol. Dougie and his men drove into an ambush and he, his gunner and his radio operator was shot and killed instantly. Dougie was shot behind the ear and my father was the first / one of the first to rush to his body. My father lifted his head of the ground and held it in his hands. This obviously had a deep effect on my dad... I honour him - it could have been my Dad...  

John Hartslief (Jnr)
john.hartslief@bombardiersa.co.za
2011-07-12 13:03:16
589

Dougie and I were at school together and were the closest of friends for our entire time together during our High School years and after School we did our then compulsory military service together. Both serving in the Army. After that year Doug went off to University in Bloemfontein and I went to Varsity in Pretoria and in the USA. Each year till 1976 we did our camps together and I was there when he died in 1976 serving his Country... I was very close to his Mom and Dad and his elder sister Mavis. Both his parent died post 2000. His Mom in a tragic car accident and his father a few years later. Lovely people they both were and like parents to myself... Mavis is lovely and has two children and lives in Krugersdorp. Dougie had a son that was born in 1976 and his name is also Douglas. His Mom Erna lives I think today in Kroonstad. You will always be remembered dear friend and forever in our hearts..! 

Colin R Cramer
colin-cramer@hotmail.com
2012-03-03 15:19:17
589I was one of the persons that had to search for the two sections when they did not return to base camp in April 1976 and lifted Dougies body out of the vehicle later that evening. He and three other young South Africans paid the highest price that evening for the stupidity of politicians like John Vorster and PW Botha. The wild west cowboy attitude of the regiment leadership and the total lack of logistical  planning by the military can also be blamed. 

What for?  To protect some contractors that was constructing a water pipeline. 

Why am I the bliksem in?

After nearly fifty years, I realise that I could have been killed that evening. Two sections went out every day to escort the contractors while the third stayed behind to protect the camp. Both persons driving the vehicles were killed that night. I was the driver of the other section that stayed behind in the camp on that specific day.

I often think about the talent that was wasted that evening, but it inspires me to make the best of my life. At least I received another opportunity in life.

The four people that died and about seven that was wounded in this skirmish, did not deserve this. In hindsight, it should have been foreseen that 22 people on two open Unimogs driving the same 20km route adjacent to the border every day, was a very easy target for Swapo who probably had about 100 armed men in the ambush. The bravery of the South African Soldiers prevented all 22 from being massacred on this day.

I am sorry I can not remember the names of the other three that died on that day.
Thys Venter
mventer@mweb.co.za
2013-06-17 13:31:36
589In honour of a good friend. We shared the same room during our national service at 4 SAI. Dougie had many ideals and would certainly have achieved his dreams. We unfortunately lost contact after national service. Was sadly hearing of his untimely death - our Regiment went to the border some 3 months later and remembering him was very sobering and kept us ever vigilant. Fanie Versfeld
verssa@telkomsa.net
2017-01-16 00:07:21
590One of a squad of Parabats from 1 Parachute Battalion, he was flying in a SAAF SA-330C Puma helicopter, # 132, which was transporting men from 1 Parachute Battalion, when the helicopter was shot down by enemy 23 mm AA fire south-east of Cuvelai in Angola, crashing inverted. None of the Parabats or SAAF crew survived. The Parabats who died that day are commemorated on the Wall of Rememberance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein. Peter
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2007-12-31 05:00:29
592

HE WAS KILLED DURING A RETALIATRY AIR ATTACK BY MIG 27`S ON THE CALUEQE DAM ON THE 27TH JUNE 1988. THE BUFFEL TOOK A DIRECT HIT, KILLING ALL OF THE OCCUPANTS.

Unknown
Unknown
2007-06-25 21:24:01
592

Ek onthou vir O/kpl Holder nog baie goed. Hy het altyd gelag met so n stoute vonkel in die oe. Ek was Seksie leier van Peleton 3, Bravo Kompanie, 8SAI tydens die aanval. Sal die troepe wat die dag gesterf het nooit ooit vergeet nie.

Gerrit Pretorius (kpl)
gpretorius@datacentrix.co.za
2009-10-06 20:37:21
593Clifford Donald Holland [ born 3/10/1956] attended Glenwood High School , Durban from 1970-73 .He was killed in a shooting accident in the operational area in June 1976 .He was 19 years of age .

2001-05-30 13:37:59
595 Renaldo Doria
Renaldodoria@gmail.com
2011-06-25 08:33:45
595Jeff Holm.died on 26/05/1973. At about 2.30 in the afternoon.after falling off a Bedford and broke his neck he sat next to me when we hit a ditch in the road and flung him off the back he was a paratrooper he is hurried un Virginia cemetry.Renaldo Doria.
renaldodoria@gmail.com
2016-05-20 23:41:18
596

On 23 November 1975, during Operation Savannah, Capt Holm led an attack via Ebo to Cond? in an armoured car, accompanied by 2Lt Hermanus van Niekerek, who was driving Capt Holm's civilian Honda.

The armoured cars came under enemy fire and one was hit, toppling into a river-bed, while the rest became bogged down. Mortars were brought forward but these could not be brought to bear on the enemy properly as their base plates kept shifting in the soft ground. The enemy continued to shell the combined South African / UNITA force, inflicting a number of casualties. In an effort to evacuate some of these casualties and retrieve their mortars, Capt Holm moved forward in his Eland armoured car, together with 2Lt van Niekerek in the Honda. Whilst doing so, an enemy rocket exploded behind the Eland and Honda, killing Capt Holm, who was exposed in the turret, and throwing 2Lt van Niekerk through the air. The Honda was destroyed.


Information extracted from Cross of Honour by Ian Uys, Uys Publishers 1992.

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2008-01-25 04:01:38
596

Capt Holm was an infantry officer who was attached to the squadron. He replaced Capt Schoeman who was injured by a landmine and took command of the squadron and was a crew member in an armoured car.

The squadron was ambushed by Cubans north of a town called Ebo on 24 November 1975. During the course of the engagement he had to expose himself to physically help another armoured car out of the ambush area. A shell exploded near by and he suffered severe head injuries. (A plastic bag had to be placed over his head to keep everything together)

His body was recovered and returned to South Africa.

Mike James
Mjames0255@msn.com
2008-11-20 10:24:54
59667728378PE Cpt J W Holm KIA at EBO 23rd November 1975Mark Goller
markantgol@gmail.com
2015-07-03 07:00:40
598

Listed on Fort Klapperkop Wall as "P.H.J. Holtshausen"

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-02-01 15:33:54
598

An ex-colleague of mine told me a few years ago that he was on that train. I called him earlier today and without referring to the accident, asked him where he was on 25 March 1977. Het asked me "what time" and I said "about 02h00". He said "sitting upright in my train bunk at Keetmanshoop station." He is very creative with the pen and he and an excellent memory, being an ex history teacher. I asked him to send me a few notes. Unfortunately it's in Afrikaans and here it is:-

"

Keetmanshoop - 25 Maart 1977

Iets maak my wakker en ek trek my regop aan die *rand* van die boonste slaapbank in ons 6-man kompartement in die 4de wa van ons troeptrein wat na die grens op pad is * ons is almal van Regiment Westelike Provincie. Dis 02:10.

Die volgende oomblik is daar *n slag en ons word almal geskud. Die ander 5 ouens val almal uit die slaapbanke en sommige word beseer toe hulle op die oopgeslaande tafel val. Almal hardloop uit na die perron en daar*s chaos. Willem (?) sit en huil op die perron.

Ons hoor toe *n trein met 2 *units* en 25 oop trokke met tonne ystererts het in ons trein wat voor die stasie staan, teen *n effense helling afgekom en in ons vasgery. Die *units* is ontspoor en die 1ste wa ook, maar die 2de een het dwarsgedraai en die ander trein se een *unit* het regdeur *n kompartement gery. Vyf van ons manne is dood, terwyl die 6de een in daardie noodlottige kompartement sonder *n skrapie deur die venster geval het. Gary Bricknel * wat vir die WP krieket speel * is een van die oorledenes.

Daar word vir volunteers gevra om die beseerdes te help en altesaam 90 manne word later na milit?re hospitale afgevoer. Twee RP*s met ammunisie word voor die telefoonhokkies op die perron staangemaak en beveel om enigeen wat 2 meter van die hokkies kom, te wond. Almal wil net teruggaan * land toe * maar kmdt Ivan Bester van die Paarl * ons bevelvoerder * s? later di? oggend dat ons voortgaan en gaan veg, en om 14:00 vertrek ons trein weer noorde toe. Heelwat van die waens is beskadig, maar hulle is intussen vervang.

Willem herinner my later hoekom hy gehuil het en ek word koud. Ons was op Kaapstad in wa 1, maar *n halfuur voor ons sou vertrek, het een of ander offisier ges? ons 6 moes na wa 2 gaan, na die kompartement waar die 5 man gesterf het. Tien minute voor ons vertrek is ons weer aanges? om na wa 4 te gaan.

Dit was nog nie ons tyd nie!"

Francois Terblanche
Francois@drakenstein.gov.za
2008-07-23 15:52:57
601S SGT Marius Horn born Ladysmith Natal 23 December 1960. Grew up in Colenso attending Colenso Primary and later Ladysmith High Schools.
National service started January 1980 Bloemfontein but relocated to 5SAI in Ladysmith and became instructor on various vehicles.
Died after a serious motor accident on convoy near Eshowe.
Was married and had a daughter.

V.Horn ( Brother)
hornv@telkomsa.net
2013-04-05 02:52:49
602About 150 members of an elite Swapo unit code named 'Vulcan' had infiltrated the farming area around Grootfontein, Tsumeb, Otavi and Tsintsabis. Several farmers and farm workers were killed during this incursion, as were seven members of Alpha Company of 61 Mech Bn on 15 April 1982. They were Rfn B.J. Wolfaardt, M. Petersen, J.H. Potgieter, L.P. Hough, L/Cpl J.J. van der Berg, Cpl M.J. van Jaarsveld and 2Lt D. van der Westhuizen ("Oom Daan").

Whilst on patrol the Lieutenant sent out a section (one Ratel) to follow a couple of tracks that the tracker had picked up. The Ratel hit an ambush just after 10 am. By the time backup had formed up and went to their aid a group of soldiers had been killed.

Information extracted from www.moth.org.za
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2009-11-17 02:01:03
603
NameGeorge Michael Howard
Unit4 Artillery Regiment
Place of UnitPotchefstroom
Place of deathNorthern S.W.A. (assumed on Oom Willie se Pad)
Date of Birth4 July 1968
Date of DeathOctober 1987
Cause of DeathDied in a traffic accident when the Buffel in which he was travelling in rolled while trying to avoid colliding with a delivery truck.
George was crushed underneath.

He was my cousin...

Grant Howard



2001-05-30 13:37:59
603Some information to update your records on 2lt GM Howard.
Date of death was 16-10-1987 and not 01-10-1987
Force Number - 83429985BG
Date of Birth - 4 July 1968
Full Names - George Michael Howard
Cemetery -  None, his ashes were spread in the Magaliesberg Hills.
Age of Death - 19

Again, as per a previous email. The circumstances of his death ares till not clear. Although a collision between his Buffel and a truck has been stated, this is not 100% clear. George died with 2 of his men, Gnr Sean Beit and L Bmdr Peter Mansfield.

I am in the process of getting his medals from the SANDF.
I am his brother.

Andrew Howard
andrew@hammerdeign.co.za
2011-02-09 13:13:50
603Horrifying accident just outside Mariental.I was the BSM of 44 BTY and the accident claimed 3 lifes and 7 casavacs.
Drunk cattle truck driver causes the accident.2 Buffels was involved in the accident and all off the deceased was in the front vehicle
After 26 years i have visited the accident site in July 2013 to pay my respect to real soldiers that died without reason.
RiP 2 Lt Howard
L/Bdr Mansfield
Gnr Biet
Dries Heyneke
driesheyneke@gmail.com
2013-07-30 13:36:42
605

DEATH OF CAPTAIN J.A.A. HOWITSON

Captain John Howitson was killed late in 1979 on a Junior Leadership training camp (OSC) at the Letaba training camp, which I think was where the Letaba Ranch Game Reserve is today ? north of Phalaborwa and east of the Hans Merensky Nature Reserve.  He was the officer in charge of the training course.  I was on the course and it was the final stage of our training.  He died after a ricochet bullet hit him where he was standing on one of the earth mounds (normally used for shooting against with the bigger machine guns), observing a shooting exercise ? half of the group was shooting from a lying (having taken cover) position at targets placed where the other half of the group had taken cover when the command was given.  Those of us not shooting at that stage were all standing behind the mound.  As candidate officers we did not necessarily get the exact details of the injury but as far as I know the bullet entered his chest somewhere below the right armpit (arms were raised holding the binoculars) and exited on the other side (or maybe the other way around).  We used R1 7.62mm rifles, of course.   He died instantly.

As the officer second-in-charge (Lt. Fouche, cannot remember his first name) was killed in a car accident (his car, a BMW518, aquaplaned and rolled on his way home somewhere in the Delareyville area) earlier (in August or September, I think) we had lost both the senior officers during the course.  His name is not on the roll of honour, presumably as his death was not related directly to military service.

Andre Basson
andre@andrebasson.co.za
2011-07-07 21:19:14
605

The Late Capt John Howitson was my brother in Law, married to my sister Marianne (nee van Graan). Marianne was at the time of John`s death pregnant with their 4rd child, Jean who was born about 7/8 weeks after his death. Marianne did not marry again, and is a single mother to 4 lovely children, Basil, Catharine Conrad and Jean. She lives in Bellville and is proud grandmother of 3 grandchildren. John`s mother and sister, Joey and Dorothy Ann respectively, still  lives in Kimberley.

Coen van Graan
coen@vangraan.co.za
2011-08-24 16:27:04
606

Brian Hoy was killed in SWA when the Ratel in which he was travelling (standing in the commanders turret) rolled during an excercise. He was with the 1st Regiment Northern Transvaal (1RNT) He was a gentle and quiet guy who died at the hands of an inexperienced driver - What a waste of a life

RIP

Unknown
Unknown
2001-08-29 16:49:03
607On 05 May 82 Lt Ray Hughes was on a training flight near Port Elizabeth. Bad weather and poor visibility caused Lt Hughes to mistake hangar lights and perimeter lights for the runway and both pilots only ejected when the plane started hitting the trees to the South of the Port Elizabeth airport.? The instructor, Capt Robbie Turner survived due to his parachute snagging on trees and slowing down his fall.? Lt Hughes unfortunately fell along an open pathway and had nothing to break his speed as they had ejected with a downward vector outside the envelope of the zero zero ejection seats.Johan Meyer
johanm@tsamail.co.za
2008-10-24 13:47:35
608

An ex-colleague of mine told me a few years ago that he was on that train. I called him earlier today and without referring to the accident, asked him where he was on 25 March 1977. Het asked me "what time" and I said "about 02h00". He said "sitting upright in my train bunk at Keetmanshoop station." He is very creative with the pen and he and an excellent memory, being an ex history teacher. I asked him to send me a few notes. Unfortunately it's in Afrikaans and here it is:-

Keetmanshoop - 25 Maart 1977

Iets maak my wakker en ek trek my regop aan die *rand* van die boonste slaapbank in ons 6-man kompartement in die 4de wa van ons troeptrein wat na die grens op pad is * ons is almal van Regiment Westelike Provincie. Dis 02:10.

Die volgende oomblik is daar *n slag en ons word almal geskud. Die ander 5 ouens val almal uit die slaapbanke en sommige word beseer toe hulle op die oopgeslaande tafel val. Almal hardloop uit na die perron en daar*s chaos. Willem (?) sit en huil op die perron.

Ons hoor toe *n trein met 2 *units* en 25 oop trokke met tonne ystererts het in ons trein wat voor die stasie staan, teen *n effense helling afgekom en in ons vasgery. Die *units* is ontspoor en die 1ste wa ook, maar die 2de een het dwarsgedraai en die ander trein se een *unit* het regdeur *n kompartement gery. Vyf van ons manne is dood, terwyl die 6de een in daardie noodlottige kompartement sonder *n skrapie deur die venster geval het. Gary Bricknel * wat vir die WP krieket speel * is een van die oorledenes.

Daar word vir volunteers gevra om die beseerdes te help en altesaam 90 manne word later na milit?re hospitale afgevoer. Twee RP*s met ammunisie word voor die telefoonhokkies op die perron staangemaak en beveel om enigeen wat 2 meter van die hokkies kom, te wond. Almal wil net teruggaan * land toe * maar kmdt Ivan Bester van die Paarl * ons bevelvoerder * s? later di? oggend dat ons voortgaan en gaan veg, en om 14:00 vertrek ons trein weer noorde toe. Heelwat van die waens is beskadig, maar hulle is intussen vervang.

Willem herinner my later hoekom hy gehuil het en ek word koud. Ons was op Kaapstad in wa 1, maar *n halfuur voor ons sou vertrek, het een of ander offisier ges? ons 6 moes na wa 2 gaan, na die kompartement waar die 5 man gesterf het. Tien minute voor ons vertrek is ons weer aanges? om na wa 4 te gaan.

Dit was nog nie ons tyd nie!

Francois Terblanche
Francois@drakenstein.gov.za
2008-07-23 15:52:57
609

One needs to read Col Jan Breytenbach's new book "Eagle Strike". An awsome account of the truth of the Cassinga attack. Not the rubbish written by certain officers who claimed to be in charge on the day and even got names incorrect of members KIA or MIA.

Clive Emmerson (Ex 32)
gfambutcher@mweb.co.za
2008-09-07 22:01:44
609I have just retutrned from a trip to Angola and this included Cassinga. Its a long story and there is not space here for it. I believe I have found the grave of Human. I did GPS the position as well. How do I get hold of the wife of Human to give her the info. Gordon McGregor Windhoek Namibia Schutztruppe
gorchris01@mtcmobile.com.na
2014-08-19 05:20:15
615

I was present where and when this person died after being shot down during ops Savannah in a Puma helicopter. His death was not due to a crash. I tried pulling him out of the burning helicopter but was unable to do so due to heat and exploding ammunition. This was more than an aircraft crash which seems to be wrongly stated on the records. There was one survivor who was badly burnt and airlifted for treatment. Place of death - Dondo (200km south east from Luanda)

hslab
hslab@absamail.co.za
2006-07-01 18:05:02
617Shot dead during an exercise at Omatiya. During Training by a mortar schrapnel.

2005-03-29 09:40:42
623Lt L Jacobs and L/Cpl P J Terburgh was killed on 07 Aug 83 in Impala Mk I (No 487) crash near VerwoerdburgJohan Meyer
johanm@tsamail.co.za
2008-10-24 14:12:57
628

Raymond Jagga, was the Medic attached to School of Armour's Tank Squadron which participated, as part of 61 Mechanised Infantry during the period June to October 1988. Raymond was killed during a SWAPO attack on the 61 Mechanised convoy returning from an excersise in the Operational Area. The Ratel in which he was travelling was struck by two RPG rockets. The first hit the engine, the second went through the door, which killed Raymond instantly.

I will miss Raymond, as he was well liked by the Tank Crews.

Regards

Cpl William Surmon
Cpl William Surmon
Unknown
2002-06-18 13:47:44
628

My brother (19) was taken away from us on the 19 August 1988, a day I will never forge t... getting a knock at the front door... my worst day ever. Raymond I love and miss u so much u just have no idea... I am still battling to come to terms with what happened... I have those days where I just want to talk to u and let u know what is happening in my life.. I love u Raymond and SALUTE YOU...YOU are my HERO..

Vonita
vonita.loubser@gmail.com
2012-08-07 01:39:36
630"Willem" Jans was killed on an external Angolan operation in the early hours of the morning of June 9th, 1979 while serving with Johannesburg Regiment on what I believe was called Ops Twaksak at the time but was later recorded as ops Caterpillar.
A composite Jhb Regt. Company had been formed along with composite companies of the SA Irish and two other regiments of the division, including the artillery outfit who had ben converted to pongos.
The composite company utilised higer ranks in the leadership positions than normal. Major Dawkshas was the Company Ccommander and I recall that Capt. Larry Lombard acted as a platoon commander. Platoon Sgt. Aap van Dyk filled a position as section leader.
The objective was to attack a large base in Southern Angola. At sunset our compant stopped for supper, then packed up and moved slightly away under cover of darkness from our position to take up the new position for the night. At approx. 01h00 we came under heavy co-ordinatied mortar fire from the NE. It was clear that the enemy had spotters because each salvo was closer to us than the last. The fire became very close - my "buddie" Willem van der Merwe and myself hopping over our meagre sandbags depending which side of us the bombs were falling. The bombs appeared to be 82mm items which we struggled to respond to with the 60mm patrol mortars that we carried. These were merely 60mm pipes with some car tyre rubber attached as a base-plate. Rob Perotti fired his with max "hulp-ladings" which resulted in the pipe pushing through the rubber and Rob breaking the bones in his wrists. The mortars must have gone on for half an hour or so and then stopped. We were all pretty shaken but went back to kip.
At around 02h00 the world exploded again when a barrage of automatic fire opened up on our position. The initial attack from the SW was virtually all tracer rounds from what appeared to be about 3 companies which lit up the sky and created a curtain of tracer streaks a few feet above our position. Mercifully the initial attack was slightly off-target which helped considerably.
Willem Jans was fatally wounded with a head-shot in the first attack. The attacked lasted for about an hour during which the enemy - which were were well directed by East German officers - advanced until they were within swaering distance, and I clearly recall some profanities being swapped by both sides!
Sgt van Dyk was wounded in the backside by some shrapnel from an RPG7 which hit a tree behind me and later took a round to the leg. I recall another Rfn getting wounded near the  ankle and another taking a round in neck after it had passed through the butt of his R1 rifle.
During the firefight the artllery was utilised (5.5" guns) which were talked in and played an effective role in routing the enemy. Following the enemy withdrawal (the sound of their vehicles was quite clear) a casevac Puma landed at around 04h00. I was tasked with running to the Puma with Sgt van Dyk's kit and clearly recall seeing Rfn Jans in the chopper which removed our wounded.
At first light an airstrike was called in which I believe hit the base that was supposed to be our target and 3 Super Frelons brought in a reaction force which cleared the area. Exhausted and shaken we trekked back to the SWA cut line where we were supplied with fresh water and left to gather our thoughts when the OC, Cmdt "Blackie" Swart arrived and pistol on hip, endeavoured to rally the troops and get them to return to the fray. Regrettably he presented a gung-ho attitude which didn't go down very well with  a bunch of guys that had just endured an extremely intense battle. And a battle it was.
B G Kirby
slaapstad@hotmail.com
2010-08-09 20:49:51
630The other person that was shot in the leg was a Rfn Momberg. I - Apie van Dyk currently still have Rfn Jans -Janse van Rensburg - dog tags in my possession after all these years. Wish I knew where or who his parents and/or siblings were. I would really like to hand these to one of them. Not sure who got shot in the neck but I recall him bleeding a lot. Our medic was Sgt Laurie Lawrence. Amazing thing with Laurie ... many years later I was in a car accident and hit my head against the windscreen and bleeding. The person that stopped to lend assistance no one other than Laurie.  
Sgt Apie ban Dyk
apvdyk@hotmail.com
2012-11-15 17:37:29
634On 10 Jul 82 Lt Van Rensburg was the pilot of Bosbok 950 that crashed near Oshigambo in SWA. Both Lt Van Rensburg and passenger CO A G Roux were killed Johan Meyer
johanm@tsamail.co.za
2008-10-24 13:51:34
634Anton Gino Rpux and I did officers course together. Afterwards we both studied at Pretoria Technikon. I did electronic eng and he did mechanical eng. In 1982 us group of students asked to also be sent to the border for duty during our study holidays. Anton and my friend Johan Laubscher, also a CO and student at PTA Technikon, were doing their stint of a month at Ondangwa. The morning they both wanted a flip and Anton and Johan flipped a coin to see who would go. Anton won. The resultant crash and deaths are history. My story can be corroberated by, at the time CO PJ Laubscher, who told us all of how his death came about. Anton is buried in the PTA East cemetary, adjacent woodlands shopping centre. RIP anton my friend.Alan thom
sle@iafrica.com
2017-10-23 13:07:45
640We were training with the no 7/8 handgrenade in Walvis Bay and were throwing in pairs. Jack Lovell and another trooper Hazell were up next. When they pulled the pin out the detonator came out and Jack was told to "Gooi die f......n ding!" But before he could do this it exploded in his hand and the other handgrenade droppedout of Hazell's hand and fell on the floor. Sgt Major Jensen fell on the grenade with a steel helmet to protect the others. Helater died that night of his injuries. Jack lost his hand and a Lt lost an eye.Greg Lawrence
greg.lawrence@za.didata.com
2011-07-27 15:25:44
64011 Sep 1974: 05128004E Warrant Officer Class II Olaf Volmer Jensen from 2 SAI Died from shrapnel wounds sustained in an accidental hand grenade explosion at Walvis Bay. He was 44.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-11 01:25:05
642L/Cpl Joao was killed during a first light attack on a SWAPO camp in the Cassumbi area east of Cassinga, when a 82mm mortar exploded between him and his machine gun buddy Rfn Tolosi.

2003-02-22 21:27:26
643Corporal J. Joao was a member of 32 Battalion, and was killed in action during an attack on a large SWAPO base in the Cambena Valley, on 13 March 1982.

Also killed in this action were 2nd Lieutenant P. Nel and  Sergeant P.T. Steward. 
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-08 12:15:12
644

On 11 February 1985, a patrol from 32 Battalion's Charlie Company were in the vicinity of the Bale River, when their over-eager company commander took a short cut, against earlier advice from headquarters, and blundered straight into a well-prepared SWAPO base, manned by some 100 insurgents. In the 25 minute battle that ensued, Charlie Company suffered heavy casualties.

In all, 12 men from Charlie Company were killed in this action or died of their wounds soon afterwards, and many more were wounded. The seven fatalities in the inital contact were:

  • Lieutenant Dave Light (killed instantly by a bullet that struck him below his left eye).
  • Rifleman P. Kahete (severe schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman A. de Almeida (a gunshot that penetrated both lungs)
  • Rifleman P. Jose (multiple schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman K. Kalonga (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Rifleman J.C. Chihamba (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Lance Corporal J.A. Sachilombo (multiple schrapnel wounds, including to abdomen)

After dark, while the casualties were being moved to a temporary emergency base, another three wounded men, all suffering from massive chest wounds, died. They were

  • Riflemen J. Fernando,
  • M. Joaquim and
  • M. Chipoya.
  • During the night another badly wounded Rifleman, M.A. Kinguelke, also died. The final death was that of Rifleman M. Muema, who succumbed to his schrapnel wounds at 10:00 the next morning.

    Later, radio intercepts indicated that SWAPO lost 15 men killed and a number wounded in this contact, and a further two SWAPO insurgents were killed by Charlie Company and one captured when they approached the base on the morning of 12th February.

    Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-09 09:50:36
647

If I am correct, this man was my sister's boyfriend before he was called up. He, and several colleagues, perished in a weapons familiarisation accident. A supposedly "safe" foreign grenade exploded and killed several men. I have no more data.

Chris Collingwood
chris_collingwood@hp.com
2001-12-26 21:45:42
647

I was friends with his sister before he went off to do his duty, and I can still recall Alan as a very out-going, friendly and mischievous character. He was usually up to something, and lived life to the full.

You are still remembered Alan, rest in peace mate.

Bob Dedekind
bobdedekind@hotmail.com
2008-09-19 11:41:53
647

Alan was my good mate and partner in all sorts of mischief. We both matriculated from Alexandra High School in Pietermaritzburg and went to Scottsville Presbyterian Church. Alan was posted to 1 SAI and I was posted to II SSB - I volunteered for officer training at School of Armour - Bloem, and occasionally saw Alan at church or at 1 SAI during weekends. He was a little sad when I last saw him - battling with homesickness and general army life (as we all did). He asked if I would come and see him a bit more often - (we were a little less restricted at Panzerskool) I was a bit slack at visits and next I heard, he had been killed.

I managed to get hold of the Adjudant at 1 SAI when I received the news a couple of weeks after the event, and quizzed him over the events of his death. I was given a similar story to that that was published in the Natal Witness - I still have a copy of the article. Not sure of the accuracy of the statement though. (Alan had been on an NCO training course.)

I will never forget you My Friend. Your death marked a very definitive change of my outlook of life. Your smile and your lust for life will always enrich the lives of those who you left behind. I never was able to maintain a relationship with Michael, Sharon Cindy or your Mom & Dad after your passing, but I always felt for their pain as well.

We Will Never Forget You.

Geoff Stedman
geoff@stedmanholdings.com.au
2011-08-29 07:35:09
647

Alan was at MLW (Mechanised Leadership Wing)with me at 1SAI. On the 11 October 1982, at Oshivello, during a familiarization with weapons used by PLAN, one of the soldiers pressed a button on a Russian grenade that exploded killing 4 soldiers.

  • Candidate Officer CASPER WILLEM JOHANNES GEUSTYN
  • Lance Corporal ALAN RODGER JONES
  • Lance Corporal JACOBUS THEODORUS MEYER
  • Lance Corporal EDGAR SYDNEY WESSELS
Doug Beveridge
dougbev@msn.com
2013-02-14 15:18:14
64808 Sep 1977: P/48888 Candidate Officer Leon Loubser Jones from 4 Squadron was killed when his AT-6 Harvard, Serial No. 7361 struck rising ground and crashed while carrying out low level flight near Pretoria. He was 20.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-08 04:53:27
655

A. Jordaan 3SAI 82-83 Charlie company - Potch 81 mm mortar

Comment: Served in 82-83: 3 SAI, with the 81mm mortar platoon C Company with Sgt Donald and other great mates

He did his bit for South Africa in the town of Xangogo, Ondjiva, and Alfa Tower etc. This is for our all the friend that lost the battle and died for South Africa Infantry.

Today my feet are slipping
inside my boots with sweat,
blisters are forming
but I can't feel them yet
My backpack is heavy,
my legs feel like lead.
Must keep my eyes open
or I could end up dead
The water I drink is black or dirty grey
but I'm so damned thirsty
it tastes like lion lager today
The smoke break is over
I'm back on the move
this is a far cry from civvy street groove
My eyes keep dropping
to the ground beneath my boots
I remember the days when we were "rower" recruits
What am I doing in this foreign land?
Why am I walking on ground like sea sand?
I'm protecting my family, my friends and my country
I'm walking patrol and I console myself with the knowledge,
I've got and extra rat pack porridge
I'm Proud to be a soldier in the S.A Infantry
I've done my share, my proof is the suntan and scare
I possess and wear with pride
I know no chef or "clerkie"
could handle this ride
so don't look at us with pity
look at us with fear
To all of you terrorists from SWAPO
BEWARE
m.panayides

2008-06-26 13:14:17
655Ek was die dag in die seinkamer op Ogongo toe die casevac verslag inkom. Het dit deurgestuur Oshakati toe en gevra vir chopper. Na helse oor en weer kommunikasie vir inligting het die chopper toe opgestyg, maar toe dit inkom by die toneel het Jordaantjie gesterf. Sy Buffel het n landmyn regs agter getref dieselfde oomblik toe dit links draai en die bakwerk regs oorleun met die gevolg dat die gedeelte wat die ontploffing moet deflekteer byna horisontaal met die grond was. n Gedeelte van die wielstasie is regdeur die bak geskiet en hom in die buik getref. Van die manne op die toneel het vertel dat toe die chopper inkom het hy na sy ma geroep en toe gesterf. Altus (Billy) Lotter
glotter@mpg.gov.za
2010-03-19 09:24:49
655Craig is factually perfectly correct ,I recall the incident well ,Jorrie took my place in this Buffel if I recall correctly ,as we were seconded to sweep the road between Oshakati and Ogongo it was a real tragedy . Hi Craig I hope you are well !Arnold Botha
arnold@anbvet.co.za
2015-06-11 07:23:12
655

This was Foxtrot Company, 6SAI and we were working in 52Battalion,  although Jordaan had  joined us from 3SAI. I was involved in this same incident and I was on the same Buffel as Jordaan.  I was in seated two seats away from behind the drivers cab; Jordaan was in the seat which was immediately over the left back wheel.

The incident happened on Friday 29th July, 1983 at about 11:30am. We were working close to the YATI, but on the SWA side, about 1.5km away from the actual border. We had just visited at a little kraal of the local people and we helped out with fixing some of the fencing. We were the lead Buffel in our patrol and we were driving slowly through a bushy area towards some trees, so that we could rest in the shade with our ration packs for lunch. Thus it seems as if the mine was something which had been dumped because we were not on the road itself. It was apparently a huge mine because the Buffel also hopped forward a good few metres. We were all flung out in various directions and there were a lot of knee and shoulder injuries done to the others on the vehicle.

I sustained many injuries, the most lasting which a very serious thumping klap to my left heel, which has left me with a grievous disability ever since. After thirty years of having to deal with permanent injury, restricted ankle movement a great deal of agony, pain and disability to my left heel bone and ankle joint, I am at the stage where I am realising I have come to the end of the life expectancy of the ankle and the joint. I have some very serious decisions to make because after thirty years of living with it, I am now faced with the possibility of a lower limb amputation. The doctors warned me about this in 2Mil Hospital after many operations and attempts at corrective surgery and physio at the time of the incident.  I was a 1982-1984 intake, but virtually the whole year of 1983 was taken up with hospitalisation.

I have very little recollection of the actual incident itself. I recall our Corporal speaking to me, informing me that we had hit a mine. I asked if I was all in one piece and he said yes, but your left foot is entirely hashed up. I recall hearing the helicopters coming in and I recall that they had informed me that Jordaan had passed on just as they arrived. His body was strapped into the harness below me inside the helicopter.  I recall coming around in 1Mil in Pretoria and that is my entire recollection of the actual incident itself.

My recollection of Jordaan was that he was a quiet and gentle person. He was very likeable and he never troubled anyone. May he rest in Peace. I give thanks and praise to God for the swift care of the medic who was with us on that patrol and I give thanks and praise to God to my fellow infantrymen who were fantastic in assisting me and everyone else who was injured in that incident.

God bless to all who read this and to all who write here on this web page. Thank you to the webmasters for such a very informative and user friendly page.

Rfln Craig Holmes-
sjtepp@telkomsa.net
2013-06-16 18:05:14
658 Jorry was killed the same day as hans marits{900}.AL Matthee
Amandre@mweb.co.za
2011-06-29 22:51:32
658 Jorry was killed by antie personel landmine,while we were on patrol.he was from 3SAI PL 4 Alfa komp.Andre Matthee
Amandre@mweb.co.za
2012-04-22 12:29:00
661

22 Sep 1989: Two members from 85 Combat Flying School were killed when their Atlas MB326M Impala Mk I, Serial No. 582 crashed near Sabie during a routine training flight. The casualties were:

  • 86641594PS Lieutenant W Bredenkamp. He was 20
  • 85331866PS Lieutenant Deon Joubert. He was 20.
Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-22 12:51:42
667

16 Sep 1991: Two members form the SADF Dog Training Centre died from smoke inhalation at Bourkes Luck while assisting to extinguish a veld fire. The casualties were:

  • 89280580BG Lance Corporal Adrian Marcel Juskiewicz. He was 18.
  • 88472451BG Lance Corporal Michael Swanepoel. He was 19.
Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-16 06:03:01
668

Military Vehicle Accident

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2002-11-25 08:40:44
669

On 11 February 1985, a patrol from 32 Battalion's Charlie Company were in the vicinity of the Bale River, when their over-eager company commander took a short cut, against earlier advice from headquarters, and blundered straight into a well-prepared SWAPO base, manned by some 100 insurgents. In the 25 minute battle that ensued, Charlie Company suffered heavy casualties.

In all, 12 men from Charlie Company were killed in this action or died of their wounds soon afterwards, and many more were wounded. The seven fatalities in the inital contact were:

  • Lieutenant Dave Light (killed instantly by a bullet that struck him below his left eye).
  • Rifleman P. Kahete (severe schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman A. de Almeida (a gunshot that penetrated both lungs)
  • Rifleman P. Jose (multiple schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman K. Kalonga (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Rifleman J.C. Chihamba (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Lance Corporal J.A. Sachilombo (multiple schrapnel wounds, including to abdomen)

After dark, while the casualties were being moved to a temporary emergency base, another three wounded men, all suffering from massive chest wounds, died. They were

  • Riflemen J. Fernando,
  • M. Joaquim and
  • M. Chipoya.
  • During the night another badly wounded Rifleman, M.A. Kinguelke, also died. The final death was that of Rifleman M. Muema, who succumbed to his schrapnel wounds at 10:00 the next morning.

    Later, radio intercepts indicated that SWAPO lost 15 men killed and a number wounded in this contact, and a further two SWAPO insurgents were killed by Charlie Company and one captured when they approached the base on the morning of 12th February.

    Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-09 09:52:05
679

On the evening of 3 April 1983, the first and fourth platoons from 32 Battalion's Alpha Company were preparing to set an ambush on a road four kilometres north-east of Vinte Sete, when they spotted six SWAPO insurgents moving ahead of them. They were spotted in turn and the SWAPO men managed to run to cover in a more favourable position, before opening fire on Alpha Company, pinning the latter down for some 15 minutes and inflicting a number of casualties on them before withdrawing under cover of an 82 mm mortar bombardment.

The combat had definitely ended in favour of SWAPO on this occasion, as Alpha Company suffered two fatalities, Sergeant A. Mande and Rifleman J.D. Kativa, whilst 11 other members were wounded, including both platoon commanders, 2nd Lieutenants A du Plessis and G.W. Roos.         

Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-08 13:17:03
684

I was present where and when this person died after being shot down during ops Savannah in a Puma helicopter. His death was not due to a crash. I tried pulling him out of the burning helicopter but was unable to do so due to heat and exploding ammunition. This was more than an aircraft crash which seems to be wrongly stated in the records. There was one survivor who was badly burnt and airlifted for treatment. Place of death - Dondo (200km South East from Luanda)

Unknown

2006-07-01 18:08:58
685

Chris Kemp was a member of 14 Field Squadron -Engineer Corps (part of Northern Transvaal Commandment). He died in a landmine explosion in January 1977 on the Golden Highway near the old Eenhana camp in Owamboland (not the new Eenhana base where the mass graves were found). We were on our way to Nkongo (?) camp on a routine patrol and the vehicle hit the landmine whilst he was walking in the bushes next to it. Those of us who were there will always remember him - R.I.P.

Johan Pistor
kaapkobra@hotmail.com
2007-07-12 10:55:19
686

I am pretty sure this is my brother. He died in a landmine explosion. He was the shortest guy in his platoon and was well liked by everyone. I was only 10 at the time when it happened but remember it like yesterday. It happened on the Sat and they told us on the Sun, a navy chaplan came by and we thought it was him knocking on the door on a Sun morning to surprise us that he was back from the border. My mum never really recovered from it. But my oldest looks just like his uncle. We love you Henkie, for us you will live on for ever. xx

Kia Hawes(Kemp)
hawesfamily5@hotmail.com
2008-01-27 05:18:58
687Major James ``Jock'' McFarlane Wilson Kerr [born 17/10/1946] attended Glenwood High School , Durban from 1960-63.He was killed on 17/8/1977 during a night-flying exercise near Upington . He was officer commanding 5 SQN at the time of his death .

2001-05-30 13:37:59
688

2Lt Keulder was killed in a SWAPO ambush south of Chana Henombe in Angola on 8 March 1977. He and his fellow 32 Bn soldiers tried to "liberate" some SWAPO cattle to Omauni for own use when the enemy opened fire on them.

Information obtained from Louis Bothma's book, Die Buffel Struikel.
Dion Rossouw
grossouw@wdsl.co.za
2007-01-24 20:55:23
688

On 9 March, whilst on patrol, Lt Gert Keulder and his patrol located a SWAPO base in the vicinity of Nutalala, which they destroyed. Whilst withdrawing from the area however, they came under attack briefly from a 300-strong SWAPO force. Although heavily outnumbered, Lt Keulder's men inflicted five fatal casualties on SWAPO, after which they withdrew. Unfortunately, Lt Keulder was also mortally wounded in this brief clash.

Information extracted from "32 Battalion - The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit" by Piet Nortje 

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-01 02:18:34
696

Killed in a shooting accident involving his beat partner, at HSPT AFB. A tragic loss !

Andy Dickerson
AndrewD32@excite.com
2001-08-07 06:52:57
697

He was just a kid. Fresh from Infantry School. Posted to 6 SAI Bn as a Pl Cmdr. I can't remember the date but I believe it was sometime in April '76 shortly after Easter. We were being deployed and tasked to establish a new base east of Eenhana. I was a signaler riding on the Doc's (Capt Toppie Mulder) Unimog. Got the message that one of the 'Mogs up ahead had rolled and several guys had been injured. This was just outside Eenhana. We broke from the convoy and rushed forward to get the Doc and the medics there. The 'Mog had rolled over him and apparently crushed his pelvis. Doc tried to stabilise him. When the choppers came we loaded him and the others to be casevaced. We carried on to our new location. We received the message later that evening that he had passed away. He was our first casualty that year. He was a good kid. Let us remember him.

Charles Schoeman
charlesschoeman@live.co.za
2009-02-19 01:52:05
697

I actually have a photograph of the chopper doing the casevac. We were part of the convoy when it happend.

If I remember correctly it was around this time of the year, either the 14th or 15th May.

Photo's are available to view on the SA-Soldier.com website.

Keith Patterson
kp@clicks.co.za
2010-05-10 10:06:47
698

Died in freak accident, at Ladysmith, drowned

Ralph McLean
ralph@southafricawargraves.org
2009-07-09 19:56:52
699Clifton was crushed by a truck entering the base where he was standing gaurd. He was still a kid. I attended his funeral in Uitenhage Eastern Cape. Rifleman 86361623 BG. John Doe
John.Doe@restinpc.com
2009-08-21 15:05:56
700I last saw Clifford alive in 1984, when we finnished high school. He went New Forest High, Woodlands, Durban. We both had one month to go (Jun 87) and he was killed. I was told he died when the buffel hit a land mine.

2004-08-13 12:49:54
700We were on an early morning log run from Nepara base 55 Bn Kavango to Rundu in the back of a Kwe 50 when our driver swerved to avoid a head on with a civilian vehicle. The civilian vehicle moved to the same side of the road as our truck forcing it of the side of the road where it rolled over crushing Clifton and Hans Scheepers under it. They died instantly.Steve Poate
spoate@gmail.com
2016-04-22 12:28:34
701Colin played on the wing for our soccer team at UPE. A really decent person who died at Omuthiya while serving with 61 MechColin van Rensburg
cvanr45@iway.na
2013-04-05 12:20:56
703

On 11 February 1985, a patrol from 32 Battalion's Charlie Company were in the vicinity of the Bale River, when their over-eager company commander took a short cut, against earlier advice from headquarters, and blundered straight into a well-prepared SWAPO base, manned by some 100 insurgents. In the 25 minute battle that ensued, Charlie Company suffered heavy casualties.

In all, 12 men from Charlie Company were killed in this action or died of their wounds soon afterwards, and many more were wounded. The seven fatalities in the inital contact were:

  • Lieutenant Dave Light (killed instantly by a bullet that struck him below his left eye).
  • Rifleman P. Kahete (severe schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman A. de Almeida (a gunshot that penetrated both lungs)
  • Rifleman P. Jose (multiple schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman K. Kalonga (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Rifleman J.C. Chihamba (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Lance Corporal J.A. Sachilombo (multiple schrapnel wounds, including to abdomen)

After dark, while the casualties were being moved to a temporary emergency base, another three wounded men, all suffering from massive chest wounds, died. They were

  • Riflemen J. Fernando,
  • M. Joaquim and
  • M. Chipoya.
  • During the night another badly wounded Rifleman, M.A. Kinguelke, also died. The final death was that of Rifleman M. Muema, who succumbed to his schrapnel wounds at 10:00 the next morning.

    Later, radio intercepts indicated that SWAPO lost 15 men killed and a number wounded in this contact, and a further two SWAPO insurgents were killed by Charlie Company and one captured when they approached the base on the morning of 12th February.

    Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-09 09:55:04
706

I only found out about what happened in 1993 when I went to visit some of the guys that joined on for short Service in 1992. Cpl Mike Land told me that L/Cpl Kladis had died in a car accident along with Pte Pohl and Pte Olberholzer. Mike Land and myself were their Medical Phase instructors.

Walter Panto
walter@zotos.co.za
2009-02-11 17:09:16
706I remember this well. All these guys were in my unit. We were split up to work at different hospitals during hospital phase of our ops medic training. The week before this happened I was at the hospital that L/CPL Kladis was overseeing. After our week had completed we went back to Jo'burg Gen and I remember being told that there had been an accident and that eight of our guys were either dead or seriously injured. I can't remember for sure but I think that PTE Gordon (also on this site) was taken in this accident. I remember going to funerals each day and being part of the military representation at L/CPL Kladis's. After that we always sang the song that PTE Pohl had written for us to sing as we ran. "Medics of '92"  Rob Pullen
WithHeld
2012-03-31 15:35:59
706I was one of the three surviving members of that accident. Myself (Daniel Wind) Sasha Harris and a "Hightower" (nickname). We were on our way to Middelburg for hospital training phase, having just returned from pass. The accident happened near Weston-area on a Monday afternoon. Head-on collision between our Hilux and red sedan. I think it was a Mazda. Oberholzer survived but was taken off life support in ICU at 1Mil.Daniel Wind
whiplash678@gmail.com
2017-01-09 12:57:48
707

Cpl. Kleynhans was the vehicle commander of a Ratel 20. He was with Bravo Company, 61 Mech and was killed on 14 February 1988 in Angola when his Ratel (22C) was hit by direct fire from an enemy 23mm gun during the attack on Fapla 59th Brigade. Three other crew members of 22C died in this attack and another 5 were injured.

Unknown
Unknown
2004-01-13 04:36:02
707

We will remember you

Unknown
Unknown
2007-03-02 22:54:48
707

Corporal Kleinhans, Rfn As & PH Groenewald and VV Nieuwenhuizen were killed at about 17h00 on the 14th of February 1988. Their Ratel (22C) got stuck on a treestump that was left on the tanktracks, earlier that day. Corporal Kleinhans got with me on the back of our Ratel (22A) and we rode there together 'til 22C caught up with us just before we entered the shona from where the attack began. Corporal Kleinhans got down from 22A and went back to 22C, a bit after they were killed in the attack. Their ratel was shot by a ZSU23-4 on the righthand side, but it had a gaping hole where Corporal Kleinhans and his MAG gunners sat. What caused the hole we will never know.

Hannes Lombaard
alpha@internext.co.za
2007-12-04 13:58:11
715In the early morning of 21/5/1985 the SAAF firemen were called to assist the Pretoria fire brigade in extinguishing a fire that had started in a nearby petrol depot . When the tank exploded , 3 national servicemen , including Donald Clench , were burned to death . All three firefighters served in the SWA/Border war, Amn Knoetze, L Cpl Clench, Sgt WJ Hawkins. Ren? Ludick
ablebrokers@telkomsa.net
2007-05-08 12:55:36
720

In the early hours of Thursday 18 February 1982, SAS President Kruger, oldest of the three Type 12 Frigates of the South African Navy, collided with the replenishment vessel, SAS Tafelberg. Both ships were severely damaged but TAFELBERG returned safely to Simon?s Town. President Kruger sank approximately two hours after the collision when efforts to keep her afloat failed.

14 men from Mess 12, Chief Petty Officers J B Booysen and W M G van Tonder; Petty Officers S A Bothma, G A Brind, R C Bulterman, G W de Villiers, E Koen, H Lotter, R A McMaster, R F Skeates, H W Smit, W R Smith, M B R Whiteley and C J Wium died in the collision and their bodies went down with the ship. A further two men, Chief Petty Officer D Webb and Able Seaman G T Benjamin, lost their lives after the collision and whilst abandoning ship. Of these last named two only CPO Webb?s body was recovered after being sighted by SAS Protea on the morning of 19 February.

See the full story in Three Frigates by Rear Admiral Chris Bennett SAN (Ret)

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2006-06-11 01:08:43
721

While on patrol, his Ratel started "Snaking" and capsized. Phillip was caught under the Ratel, from the waist down.

We were called to assist as 61 Mech was stationed at our base as visitors at the time. I was an Ops Medic with the RM at the time. Phillip was a friend in the short time I got to know him and will be sorely missed.

L/Cpl JC Koen
jakeskoen@webmail.co.za
2009-04-25 20:19:56
721

18 Sep 1988: 84464296BG 2/Lieutenant Petrus Gerhardus Lourens Koen from 61 Mechanised Battalion Group was critically injured on 16 September 1988 when his Ratel overturned while traveling between Ogongo and Okalongo in Northern Owamboland. He was evacuated to 1 Military Hospital in Pretoria where he succumbed to his injuries on 18 September 1988. He was 19.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-19 00:37:27
722As far as I know, Rob met his death in an accident onboard the SAS DRAKENSBERG.
I served with Rob in the Navy Permanent Force when we were both mideshipman, and have great memories of an astro-navigation training cruise that we did to the Far East onboard the Safmarine owned SA CONSTANTIA.  While exploring Tokyo one day, on a whim, we decided to head out to Mount Fuji, and the two of us walked up the mountain where we spent the night in a lodge near the summit.  We hadn't intended doing this, and only had a packet of dried squid between the two of us to share.  Young Japanese guys were carrying bicycles up the mountain and getting the saddles branded at each of the "stations" along the route.  Those were good times!  Rob was such an easy-going and popular guy.  His death was really tragic and a great loss to the Navy, as well as to all his friends.

On Mount Fuji - 1983?


at a fish market in Singapore, en route to Japan (1983?)

The SA Constantia, off Hiroshima, Japan.
Andrew Preston
ampres3@yahoo.com
2011-12-03 04:19:12
726

Cpl. Koorts was my platoon seargent when I was busy with Basics at 8SAI in Upington in 1988. Later in 1988, Koorts was posted to the operational area and was patrolling near Cuito Cuanavale. They were attacked one afternoon by Cuban MIGS, and the story we heard whilst busy with 2nd Phase training at Riemvasmaak, was that one of the MIG21's? released a bomb that dropped into a Buffel troop carrier - Koorts and Tucker (his Lieutenant) were in the Buffel when the bomb exploded.

Sadly, Koorts was not a well liked person - of all the guys in my platoon not one dwelt too long on hearing the news of his death. Tucker was different though - he was a brilliant bloke....really sad to have seen him go.



2001-06-04 18:17:07
726

We were together from the first day. He was most of the time a cheerfull lad. Always found new ways to p$%* off the Cpl. He always took training with a spoon. He was my pole buddy and my room buddy. Golf coy lost a good soldier and I a good friend. I saw the buffel at ruacanna a while later and could not help bursting into tears. Always questions but no answers. You will be missed mate. God bless.



2005-03-02 15:58:39
726Ons was gedurnde 1988 op die grens toe EP Koorts en die ander dood is. Ek was in Bravo komponie (Peleton 2) van 8 SAI en dis die eerste maal dat ek gesien het hoe n Kaptein (Harde PF man) in trane uitbars. EP was ook saam met my in die skool in Tulbagh. Hy is gebore in 1968 en sy graf is in Tulbagh. Willie
willie.steyn@transpaco.co.za
2013-01-07 04:39:39
726Koortsie was with me at Oudtshoorn in the same bungelo. I will never forget how we cleaned the floors with an blanket with a trommel on top of it. We polished the floor made someone sit on top of a army trommel and dragged it down to the entrance door good fun. The hole platoon stayed in the bungelo, and we always wanted to ride the trommel. After we got our stripes as Platoon Sargent we were placed. Koortsie landed up with me in Upington. We were ready for the new intake for basic training. As Platoon Sargent we all had our own rooms in a double story building. Koortsie was two rooms away from my room. Will never forget the order to pack his belongings for his parents. Remember the radio that we listen to some nights. Rest in peace Koortsie will not forget. Andy
andy.combrink@gmail.com
2014-11-09 11:57:34
726So sad, sitting today in front of the PC and thinking back to those years. They will never be forgotten. IT still brings tears to my eyes.Didi 12B
didi.henning@smhgroup.co.za
2015-09-26 02:55:15
726Koperaal / koperaal 2015 kyk hoeveel jaar later ons dink nog aan jou jy was kwaai maar het goeie rede gehad ons sal nie vergeet hoe ons geleer het by jou ons harte seer jare later nog GOD SEEN ryklik ons het geveg vir land wat veraai was jare later LeonLeon Cronje
lcronje6@gmail.com
2015-11-12 22:51:25
732Maj E "Gene" Kotze spent a part of 1981 (Ops Protea) at AFB Ondangwa as Impala pilot and volunteered for a tour as Ops Officer. Early in 1982 he flew a mission into Angola and went MIA. It was later established that he had been shot down near Cuvelai.

2003-05-31 10:53:29
732Full Names: Eugene Kotz? Date of Birth: 16 April 1947 Date of Passing: 1 June 1982 Age at Death: 35 years Place of death: Cuvelai, Angola Awards: Southern Cross Decoration Pro Patria Nicky Kotz?
nikik@coastalkzn.co.za
2007-05-29 08:32:13
736Lawrence Kretzmann was a childhood friend of mine and we served together at 11 Commando, Kimberley. He was in a Buffel on the way back to base(Oshakati), when the vehicle struck an animal and overturned. He died a few days later at 1 Mil. Hospital in Pretoria. He was a cheerful "never say die" type of person who didn't deserve to be cut down in his youth. I believe he was 18 at the time of his death. He was an East Londoner.Aidan
crawford@iburst.co.za
2011-06-20 14:42:39
736If I recall correctly the accident in which Lawrence was injured occurred in October 77. As reported above the accident happened as the vehicle was returning to our base in Oshakati. We were part of B Company, 11 Commando of the January 1977 intake. Four troops were in the buffel including the driver who i cannot recall. The other two troops were a certain P De Lange and James Doubt. James was also severely injured and Piet de Lange was relatively unscathed. Lawrence was evacuated to 1 Military Hospital in Pretoria but the jnternal injuries he suffered were too severe and he did not make it. I was in the same platoon ( not section) as Lawrence. I also knew Lawrence from East LondonJeffrey
jeffsmmr@gmail.com
2016-11-17 01:09:13
738

Cpl. Hannes Kriel was a SAAF photographer who died when Wasp No 86 of 22 Flight crashed off Milnerton while exercising for the welcoming of the new frigate SAS President Pretorius on the 25th September 1964. Trapped in the back seat he was unable to escape as the pilots did.

Eugene Griessel
eugene@dynagen.co.za
2005-12-06 16:48:06
738

25 Sep 1964: P/18727 Corporal Johannes David Kriel, an Air Photographer attached to 22 Flight (Later 22 Squadron) was Reported Missing while documenting "Operation Flaminkdans", the welcoming of the South African Navy Frigate SAS President Pretorius into South African waters when the Westland Wasp Helicopter, Serial No. 86 suffered engine failure and crashed into Table Bay 7 miles West of Dassen Island. He has no known grave and remains unaccounted for. He was 25.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-25 07:40:11
741died in accident while transporting people back to potch from 1 mil

2003-11-15 12:58:55
741He was a driver for potch medical camp.

2003-11-15 13:02:22
742

There is a further mention made in your records of a Attie Krog who also was from 5SAI who died in South West.

The story there was that the July 78 intake at Ladysmith sent some new drivers to Nkongo when we went back to this base about November 78. These drivers had only been in the army about 5 months and could not keep up with the likes of Attie who was an ouman driver and so they damaged a lot of vehicles. By this time a new road had been built from Eenhana to Oshikati and we were now at Eenhana in January 78.

It was decided to send Attie in his buffel with 10 of the new drivers from Eenhana to Oshikati, from there the new drivers would return to Ladysmith. Attie let one of the new drivers drive as he knew the guy from school and Attie sat in the middle seat in the buffel. Luckily everybody strapped in and they decided to spook the new road ie take a chance and not use mine detectors. This was a bad move as this road had been constantly sabotaged with mines since it was built.

On their journey they hit 3 anti tank mines killing the driver instantly and Attie got crushed by the steel brace that sits underneath the centre seat. A school friend who was also in the vehicle told me later that the bones in his heels were sticking out of his boots after the blast. He had to stay at Natal Command for an extra year after his 2 years as the army would not dicharge him until his wounds had healed.

I hope this sheds some light on Atties death.

Derek Austin
pondokie@hotmail.com
2008-01-05 13:13:40
742

I was in the same landmine as Attie. He was my ouman and a kind guy. Later on the same day of the landmine he died in hospital next to me. Another person died in the same accident. The other names I remember are Garry Russow and Pop Bradfield come to mind. The aniversary of the mine was on the 12 January.

Bruce Forbes
bjforbes@telkomsa.net
2008-01-25 20:46:09
742I was part of the convoy, a sapper driving in the front vehicle, the first and second vehicle missed the landmine and Attie and them were in the 3rd vehicle who hit the mine. As far as I can remember only 1 person was strapped in and the rest got blown out of the vehicle sustaining serious injuries. I can remember the driver, when I got to him he was busy dying and I stayed with him until he died. For Attie he was in serious pain, his leg was shattered, blown out of one of his boots with metal stuck in his feet. The rest of the people were scattered all over and next to the road, It was a terrible day and I tried to help and comfort people where I can until the chopper arrived. I can remember Attie as being quite a big guy and on occasion he was also driving us sappers when sweeping roads. The mine incident happened about 7 kilos from Etale base on Willies pad. My sincere condolences to everyone involved.johan de winter
jdewinter1@yahoo.com
2016-04-28 20:39:11
745Anton Kruger, was a Parabat from 1 Parachute Regiment and shot down in the Puma SE of Cuvelai on 9th August 1982.  He was from Middelburg Transvaal which might lead to the information showing him as from 4 SAI.  The current information is not correct to the best of my knowledge.L Bruwer
louis@bizxchange.co.za
2012-04-23 06:01:58
747

The young (18) A.A. Gunner blown in half by a 20mm shell. 15th January 1984

Niel Wiid
niel@systemiclogic.net
2009-10-24 12:38:16
74726 years later I still remember the scene of that day as if it was yesterdaysteve
steve.carlsson@yahoo.co.uk
2011-12-28 17:14:06
751

Operasie Kropduif (die aanval op Eheke) op 28 Oktober 1977, sou die donkerste dag in die geskiedenis van die Suid Afrikaanse Spesiale Magte se bestaan wees.

Nadat die Suid Afrikaners aan Angola onttrek het in 1976, sou Swapo die geleentheid gebruik om operasionele basisse bykans teen die SWA grens te vestig. Hierdie basisse is vanaf twee groter streeks hoofkwartiere ondersteun. Cassinga sou die sentrale deel van Swapo se aanvalle op die SWA grens ondersteun, en Eheke die oostelike deel van Owamboland en die Kavango.

Daar is besluit om Eheke eerste aan te val. Drie kompanies van die nuwe 32 Batteljon sou te voet oor die grens, en Eheke vanaf die suide aanval. Op dieselfde tyd sou 'n groep van die Verkennings Kommando's, noord van Eheke afgeooi word, en met eerstelig die basis uit die noorde aanval.

Alles het van die begin verkeerd gegaan. Die Spesiale Magte is sowat 15 kilometer te ver noord uit die vliegtuie gelaat. Om dinge verder te kompliseer was die terrein plat en sonder bakens. Eers teen dagbreek was die verkenners in 'n situasie om sinvol te kon navigeer. Toe Drie Twee nog ook halfpad na die teiken, teen 'n verwoede Swapo mag vasloop is daar met reg gevra of die operasie nie afgelas moes word nie. Ook veterane soos Sers Maj FC van Zyl vra vrae. Die bevelvoerende offisier Brig Gleeson, in Rundu het teen die beter wete van die grond bevelvoerders besluit dat die operasie moes voortgaan.

Toe gebeur 'n volgende tragedie. Eheke het uit 'n groter kompleks bestaan as wat die foto interpretasie kenners raak gesien het. Behalwe vir die basis in die suide was daar ook 'n basis in die noord ooste. Hierdie kompleks is totaal misgekyk. Teen drie uur die middag loop die verkenners in 'n trop beeste vas. Die veld was bebos maar onder is die hout en dekking verwyder. Die bees wagtertjie wys na die loopgrawe voor hulle.

Die Operateurs vorm 'n linie met die ondersteunings groepe na agter. Aan die linkerkantste buite flank is Michiel 'Vingers' Kruger met 'n RPG, dan aan sy binnekant, Gert Eksteen met 'n LMG, dan FC van Zyl, Wentzel Marx met 'n LMG, Gary Walker met 'n RPG, Grant Clark, nog een, dan Antonie Badenhorst en dan Luit Chris Strydom. Aan hulle regterkant is nog groepe besig om vorentoe te beweeg. Dan bars alle hel los. Die seksie aan die linker flank het vasgeloop in die deel waar die basis se loopgrawe 90 grade wegswaai van die lyn van die aanval. In plaas daarvan dat hulle soos die res van die aanval die vyand frontaal aanval, loop hulle hulle vas in 'n vuur nie net van voor nie maar ook van die kant. Amper soort van verby die loopgrawe geloop!!

Hierdie toeloop van gebeure sou die lewe van ses jong mans kos. Letterlik binne sekondes. Die eerste om te val was FC van Zyl, die man wat die res van die seksie geinspireer het toe niemand meer lus was nie. Bykans op dieselfde oomblik sterf Vingers Kruger, die man heel buite op die flank. Tussen hulle twee stoor Gert Eksteen se LMG. Hy gaan sit op sy hurke om sy wapen se probleem uit te sorteer. Toe sy regterhand aan sy wapen raak, skiet 'n projektiel hom net bokant sy regter middelvinger deur sy hand. Sy wapen ook stukkend. Aan die regterkant gaan dit nie beter nie. Wentzel Marx, Gary Walker, Grant Clark, Antonie Badenhorts sneuwel almal. Luit Strydom word ook gewond. Gert Eksteen het nerens om heen te gaan nie. Hy haal sy pistool uit en veg met sy linkerhand verder. Op 'n stadium word twee van die ander groep deur 'n RPD masjien geweer vas gepen. Hulle kan hom nie raak skiet waar hy agter 'n boom le nie. Toe die gunner weer om die boom kruip skiet Gert Eksteen hom met sy pistool dood.

Met durf en determinasie veg die aanvallers teen die oormag en wen stukkie vir stukkie die stryd. Gert Eksteen is nie meer nodig nie. Sy hand bloei te veel. Hy beweeg terug, waar hy Kapt Meerholz aantref met 'n skoot deur die been. Hy help Meerholz so aba-aba terug na die mediese pos. By die mediese pos pluk hy sy middelvinger wat net aan 'n velletjie hang af en gooi dit in die Angolse stof. Sy hand word verbind. Hy gaan terug na sy gesneuwelde makkers en bring hulle een vir een terug.

Ek glo nie Gert Eksteen het die storie ooit vroeer aan enige iemand vertel, voor die Maandag aand in Januarie 2004. 'Ek het my hand by die werk in 'n ongeluk seergemaak' sou hy altyd se as iemand hom vra. Meer wou ek nie vra nie. Ek was op 'n baie persoonlike en privaat gebied. Maar ek is dankbaar. Helde almal van hulle, maar medaljes word ongelukkig nie in getalle toegeken nie, al is die dapperes ook 'n seksie van agt Recces. Hulle kon maar vir almal van hulle gegee het. Daardie dag is net 3 Honoris Crux toegeken. Corrie Meerholz sou een kry.

Leon
leonbez@lantic.net
2007-02-12 20:59:15
751M Le GrangeM.LeGrange
9949
2008-05-01 22:34:42
752

If recall OP Kruger, had a twin, both were killed in a landmine blast back in 1982. I was in the same sqn with them.

Glen
micfis@venturenet.co.za
2009-05-25 16:00:27
753Died alongside his twin brother in a landmine detonation. S M BRANTD
steven@autoexeccorp.co.za
2015-10-12 07:37:42
757

JD

Here is (finally and while I'm still subscribed!) that tribute to GK I mentioned that was published in the school yearbook.

There is also a pic of him wearing his SADF stepouts I think, but I have yet to dig the book itself out. I got the teacher who had written it to post this to me for your ROH, you have her permission to use it, she is Dylan Weston in case you want to ascribe the words to her, she taught him in his last year or two at Sunward Park High School in Boksburg.

Hope this is of use to you.

Trev

Trev
spokest@mail02.onetel.net.uk
2002-04-26 13:54:20
757I was with Grant the day he was killed,he was our falk medic,very dedicated and commited to every one in our valk.He and 11 other great guys died that day,i will always remember them.Mark
mark@ingwesales.co.za
2007-10-09 15:30:43
757One of a squad of Parabats from 1 Parachute Battalion, he was flying in a SAAF SA-330C Puma helicopter, # 132, which was transporting men from 1 Parachute Battalion, when the helicopter was shot down by enemy 23 mm AA fire south-east of Cuvelai in Angola, crashing inverted. None of the Parabats or SAAF crew survived. The Parabats who died that day are commemorated on the Wall of Rememberance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein. Peter
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2007-12-31 05:02:53
757

Grant, never a day goes by without thinking of you. My oldest son looks, talks and writes like you. He too questions the world's norms and vocalises these in an opinionated and thought provoking manner. You would have loved him. I always remember Mom saying, Grant whatever you do don't join the "Paratroopers."

We had such a sense of foreboding and fear for you when you were on the border. The loss of my only much loved brother is something I have never fully come to terms with. I still suffer seperation anxiety when my children go away as I do not take it for granted that they will come home. You never came home and I spent many years illogically hoping that a mistake had been made. We never had the privilege of closure and I still have so many unanswered questions. My youth and trust in life was shattered forever when we lost you. I now live in Australia . It has has been a difficult adjustment for me as I do not transplant well.

I know that you are with us in spirit You touched the lives of so many people in the short time you were on this earth. You inspired us, made us laugh with outrageous comments and also infuriated us at times..How I wish you had made safer choices. It wasn't to be.

Thank you so much to those who have left a message on this site. Thank you for remembering a young man who was taken from us much too soon.

Charon Olsen
ccolsen@optusnet.com.au
2008-09-15 05:22:01
757

I just wanted to add a little note on here to say that more than 25 years after Grant's passing, I took my daughter who is now 12, to the SANDF memorial in Pretoria. I was just 6 years old when Grant passed away, and it was with both pride and heartsore that I could show my daughter our cousin's memorial plaque and tell her the story of Grant. 

Grant, you may be gone from this life, but you most definitely are not forgotten. Even by someone who was just a little girl at the time.....your memory will live on and be passed down. Until we meet again. Sandy.

Sandy
sandy@dorma.co.za
2009-07-20 16:37:24
757It is 30 years ago that you were taken from us so tragically and yet your memory still burns so brightly in our hearts.
We mourn the loss of a son, brother, uncle and family that you may have had and wonder how different our lives would have been if you had come home safely to us.
You were loaned to us for such a short time but we are thankful that we had the privilege of having you in our lives our beautiful son and your memory will live in our hearts forever.
You were such a caring and talented young man and we know that you would have made a difference in the lives of others.
You touched the lives of so many who knew you and on your passing we received so many phone calls and letters, some even from men that had served in WW11 and it would seem that you are still being remembered by so many. Thank you to all the dear people who have written messages for him.
We look forward to the day when we will all be together again - what a celebration that will be.
There can never be a greater loss than that of a child - a void that can never be filled. We will always remember you our precious Son.
Till we meet again
Forever in our hearts
Mom and Dad

We also remember the young men that died with you and all their families.
 





Brian and Denise Krull
thekrulls@optusnet.com.au
2012-10-07 00:40:03
757It is 30 years ago that you were taken from us so tragically and yet your memory still burns so brightly in our hearts.
We mourn the loss of a son, brother, uncle and family that you may have had and wonder how different our lives would have been if you had come home safely to us.
You were loaned to us for such a short time but we are thankful that we had the privilege of having you in our lives our beautiful son and your memory will live in our hearts forever.
You were such a caring and talented young man and we know that you would have made a difference in the lives of others.
You touched the lives of so many who knew you and on your passing we received so many phone calls and letters, some even from men that had served in WW11 and it would seem that you are still being remembered by so many. Thank you to all the dear people who have written messages for him.
We look forward to the day when we will all be together again - what a celebration that will be.
There can never be a greater loss than that of a child - a void that can never be filled. We will always remember you our precious Son.
Till we meet again
Forever in our hearts
Mom and Dad

We also remember the young men that died with you and all their families.
 





Brian and Denise Krull
thekrulls@optusnet.com.au
2012-10-07 00:40:10
757I remember when Grant came to Sunward (after having been at boarding school) - a number of us (Russell, Mark, me and others) already knew him, however, he was initially a bit reticent. Soon though he became one of us and strove to do good things both in and out of the class. My best memories of him were always around sport and "recreation". A tremendous athlete, a good pivot and a reliable and supportive friend. I remember, emotionally, the day in 1982 when I attended the parade in Bloemfontein to farewell a friend. I was honoured to lay a wreath on behalf of the school and to support another mutual friend (now for over 45 years) who was in active service with the special forces at the time Grant was killed: whilst I was in my second year of studies. Vale Grant - Gone but not forgottenGrant
e.johnstone13@bigpond.com
2014-09-13 20:55:55
757I remember when Grant came to Sunward (after having been at boarding school) - a number of us (Russell, Mark, me and others) already knew him, however, he was initially a bit reticent. Soon though he became one of us and strove to do good things both in and out of the class. My best memories of him were always around sport and "recreation". A tremendous athlete, a good pivot and a reliable and supportive friend. I remember, emotionally, the day in 1982 when I attended the parade in Bloemfontein to farewell a friend. I was honoured to lay a wreath on behalf of the school and to support another mutual friend (now for over 45 years) who was in active service with the special forces at the time Grant was killed: whilst I was in my second year of studies. Vale Grant - Gone but not forgottenGrant
e.johnstone13@bigpond.com
2014-09-13 20:56:01
762

13 Sep 1987: Six members of 32 Battalion were Killed in Action in a single incident during Ops Modular in Southern Angola.

A 32 Battalion Anti-Tank Ratel 90, Callsign 13, Commanded by 2/Lieutenant Jose Raymond Alves became bogged down in a muddy shona while engaging FAPLA manned Soviet T-55 tanks. Before the men could extricate themselves, their Ratel 90 was hit and destroyed at point blank by a Soviet T-55 tank shell. The tank round penetrated the Ratel through the side door and detonated inside the main ammunition storage container. This resulted in an explosion within the Ratel causing the vehicle to catch fire. The Ratel crew and passengers were all killed instantly in the explosion. The burnt out Ratel was later destroyed by SADF Engineers to prevent its capture. Captain Alfred Desmond McCallum was the Commanding Officer of Foxtrot Company.

Those Killed in Action were:

  • 74316175PK Captain Alfred Desmond McCallum. He was 28
  • 83502815BG 2/Lieutenant Jose Raymond Alves. He was 20.
  • 83302422BG Lance Corporal Matthys Michael De Klerk. He was 20.
  • 832441178BG Trooper Marthinus Johannes Kuyler. He was 20.
  • 81533671SP Lance Corporal Joao Rodrigues Mananza. He was 33.
  • 76928621SP Lance Corporal Waite Tchipango. He was 31
Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-15 02:01:38
765My Vader sterf te Rodesia Kariba Dam. Was Getroud met Hendriena Maria Fuller het 3 Kinders nagelaat. Riaan,Chantelle en Morne

2004-09-28 16:16:26
768Johann Labuschagne was killed on 7 February 1987 in a shooting accident during an inspection and is buried in the Stikland Cemetery - Bellville.

Information was obtained from www.moth.org.za
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2009-11-17 01:18:17
768According to the book Battle on the Lomba. Chapter 6 He was killed by an LMG during a training exercise. He was with charlie squadron of 61 mech. RIPfranco
cilliers.franco@gmail.com
2017-05-08 07:11:11
769I am his eldest daughter Charmagne Goncalves nee Labuschagne
My father was Captain Jacques Guillaume Labuschagne. He died in a Shackleton plane crash on 8th August 1963 in Steynskool Mountains. He was 29 years old. He was studying to write his exams to become a Major and the Air Force Rugby Captain. We lived in Wynberg Military Camp, Cape Town. He is buried in Graaff-Reinet.
Charmagne Goncalves nee Labuschagne his eldest daughter
bgoncalves@iburst.co.za
2010-04-30 20:45:59
769Captain Jacques Guillaume Labuschagne belonged to 35 Squadron. Died in Shackleton plane crash 8 August 1963Charmagne Goncalves nee Labuschagne his eldest daughter
bgoncalves@iburst.co.za
2010-05-24 00:52:00
769A beloved father who died in the service of the South African Airforce. He was Captain Jacques Guillaume Labuschagne. The Captain of the Air Force rugby team and about to write his exams to become a Major. He died 8 August 1963 in Steyskloof Mountains. Sorely missed and loved by his eldest daughter, Charmagne Goncalves nee LabuschagneCharmagne Goncalves nee Labuschagne his eldest daughter
bgoncalves@iburst.co.za
2010-05-25 19:17:52
769Captain Jacques Guillaume Labuschagne, a loving father, a beloved son, a treasured brother and uncle, died tragically in a Shackleton plane crash on the 8 August 1963. You will never be forgotten and are sorely miss. Our broken hearts long to meet up with you again. We love you forever.charmagne
bgoncalves@iburst.co.za
2010-05-30 23:01:33
769Captain Jacques Guillaume Labuschagne was born on the 7 September 1934 in Graaff-Reinett. He was father to three children Charmagne, Patricia and Jacques Labuschagne. He was married to Maureen Joan Labuschagne.
He died in a tragic Shakelton plane crash in the Steynnskloof Mountains, Cape Province on the 8 August 1963. He belonged to 35 Squadron.
charmagne
bgoncalves@iburst.co.za
2010-06-13 18:57:38
769Captain Jacques Guillaume Labuschagne was the 2 Captain on board the ill fated Shackleton flight on the 8 August 1963.Charmagne Goncalves nee Labuschagne his eldest daughter
bgoncalves@ibust.co.za
2010-08-27 00:10:02
772L/Cpl. Olaf Johan de Villiers Lagesen , 86492857BG, born on 12 March 1970 and attached to 5 South African Infantry Battalion was killed on 11 March 1990 when a Samil 20 rolled 11 kilometers north of Komatipoort.

Information extracted from www.moth.org.za
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2009-11-17 01:47:02
773Kevin was accidentally shot, on the 4th of November 1975, whilst laying on his bed, sleeping, in Rundu. Apparently another soldier, who came of watch duty, threw his Uzzi 9mm on his bed, resulting the Uzzi which was still loaded, to discharge, Hitting Kevin and resulting in his death. I was not present but got the facts today, the 4th, from a facebook posting in the group, We wore browns, we were soldiers. Andr?? v d Merwe
acdvandermerwe@gmail.com
2016-11-04 09:22:10
775

I grew up with Danny Lan in Hatfield, Pretoria. He was mates with my best friend's brother, Carl Honicke. As far as I know, Dan was a door-gunner in an Allo gun-ship, and he was apparently killed on an Op, but don't know the circumstances.

The strange thing about this is that Dan was a first-generation ex-patriot Israeli, and according to SADF custom, shouldn't have been in Sector 10 at all, as the policy was not to allow Jewish people up there because of dietary complications (Kosher kitchens).

Jakes Louw
jakeslouw@gmail.com
2004-08-24 12:51:40
775

Check out everyone who was based in Hoedspruit and then transferred to Ondangwa - the common denominator is that they "dead". Perhaps Steve could fill us all in with what happened to them, if he is still alive.

Daniel's helicopter apparently flew into an electric cable over the border and he was thrown out of the helicopter and the chopper landed on him. This is why he, like Eddie Bloem, was also not able to be identified by his family after his death and why there was a "closed" coffin.

Eddie and Danny were mates and were both based in Hoedspruit then transferred to Ondangs, both are dead, both deaths were under strange circumstances. Paranoid? 773301058, no answers, only ever questions.

Katherine

2007-05-12 20:06:20
775

I was with Danny on the F/E course in Bloem. I have good memories of us together. We often went to my parents place in Durbs on weekends during the course (as there were only 4 english speaking guys on the course). It was with deep sadness and shock my friend to see your name on the SAAF memorial during a visit to SA during 2001 and I can honestly say I wept tears that I survived and you did not, why? We both had a common dream and we often discussed what we would do after the SAAF. I chose to pursue my aviation career in Switzerland and have been true to it ever since leaving the SAAF. Rest in peace my friend as I still look at the fotos of the two of us in the Berg during the mountain course and have fond memories of us discussing our aviation careers after the SAAF. Sadly yours ended to soon. I by the grace of God managed to continue my dream.

suts
gsutton@jetclub.ch
2008-02-02 00:01:20
775

Unfortunately the stories above are not true. Danny was killed by a SWAPO terrorist AK 47 round to the chest ALMOST a year and a day after Eddie Bloem died in a helicopter accident. Eddie Bloem had just returned from his brothers funeral in Durban, (stabbed in the chest by a an unknown F@@C#*).

When Eddie returned to Ondangwa he insisted that he fly the night ops and in the place of Danny he flew out of Ondangwa. The approach to the forward base from where they would have operated that night involved landing in a very dusty area. The first helo to land circulated so much dust that Eddie's heli had to abort the landing and the pilot involved turned to the right instead of the left. The heli blades sliced thru the tower and the tail rotor gearbox was caught in the stay cables of the tower. As the int officer was seated in Eddies seat at the time and Eddie on top of the 20mm cannon, as the pilot tried to do an emergency landing, due to a tail rotor failure, the helo rolled to the port side and Eddie fell out, the helo landed on top of him. He died 45 minutes later.

Danny was killed in a SWAPO-SADF SKIRMISH A YEAR later as far as I can remember, possibly as a result of a cowboy helo pilot who I refused to fly with, because he liked to fly low and slow, not the recommended altitude of 800ft and 65 knts. Harry Somebody!

May EDDIE and DANNY R.I.P. forever and we shall always remember them for always and forever!

ADO
allan.oelschig@gmail.com
2011-09-23 20:07:59
775I was a Technical Officer based at the Base Aircraft Servicing Unit AFB PE/16 Squadron and was stationed at Ondangwa at the time of this incident. Danny was Flight Engineer on standby and he and I were sitting on some rotor blade boxes enjoying the bright sun in front of the hangar waiting for a call out. Danny was telling me that he was wanting to leave the SAAF and his dream was to start a car wash business with his father or brother. The call came that there was activity to the north quite close to base. Danny went out and got the Alo ready. The pilot arrived and they took off and flew down the runway past the Recce fort and the Dak parking lot and were soon lost to view. I remained sitting and was surprised when a short while later when the Alo returned and air taxied to the hospital. Danny was rushed inside to the operating theater - but unfortunately they were not able to save his life. A tragic loss. I believe he had taken two bullets to the chest and so both lungs were severely compromised. I remember he always wore the Star of David. Geoff Hussey - Lt SAAF 1977 - 1988 77238823PE
geoff@surfdyne.com
2016-11-03 03:18:04
778

18 Sep 1973: 72548431N Rifleman Terence Arthur Langley from 3 SAI died from a gunshot wound accidentally self-inflicted while stationed at Rundu. He was 18.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-19 00:28:38
779

14 Sep 1988: 85628279BG Sapper Andre Stephan Lategan from 5 Military Works Unit was accidentally killed on the Dwaalboom Road near Thabazimbi while loading a road grader. He went under the trailer to put in the retaining pin but the pin snapped causing both the trailer and grader to fall on him, killing him instantly. He was 21.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-16 01:30:49
782Maj. A.D. Lawrenson was my father and he did not participate in the the SWA Border conflict. He was however active in the Korean War in 1952 and died flying a Dornier at Belfast, OFS? at the age of 42. He was awarded the Bronze Star as well as the Distinguished Flying Cross plus other medals of which I don't have details at this minute. Janet Lawrenson
minnow3@bigpond.com
2008-03-03 23:19:10
786L/Cpl A.M. le Roux was a member of 7 SAI and based in the Piggs Peak area, near the Swaziland border. The SADF troops in this area were engaged in continuous border surveilance operations to prevent ANC and other insurgent activity from neighbouring countries. On Sunday 2 November he was on patrol and was riding a horse down a road regularly used by the SADF soldiers in this area, when the horse trod on a double cheese mine, planted in the road by unknown insurgents. Both L/Cpl le Roux and the horse were killed instantly in the resultant explosion.Peter Chapman
chappiep@hotmail.com
2006-03-10 10:02:11
787I never knew the man, but have some info about his death. Trooper David Barand le Roux, born on the 31/01/1955, 1 SSB , 71236384N . Killed in a landmine explosion on the 12/10/1975. His Eland-60 hit an improvised exlosive device at Luiana on 12 October 1975. The driver, D B (David) le Roux of A Squadron 1SSB was killed in the incident. Two others, the crew-commander, J J (Koos "Gobabis") van Zyl and L L R (Lourens) Kriel were injured and casevaced. Someone who was there when it happened wrote " Die drywer (Le Roux) het gesneuwel in die landmyn ontploffing. Die ander 2 bemanning het by die oop turret uit gevlieg. Ons het hulle n ent van daar af gekry. Pik swart gebrand maar redelik ok. Le Roux se kop en gedeelte van sy bolyf was weg. Dit was vreeslik om die reuk van gebrande mens vleis te ervaar. Die wereld was bestrooi met rokende ammo. Dit het in suid oos Angola gebeur langs die Luiana rivier. " I have a photo of the destroyed Eland. May he RIP.Mark Goller
markantgol@gmail.com
2016-07-16 06:39:21
788

Were killed when a mortar round hit the rollbar of their buffel on the 31/12/83.

Doug Beveridge
doug@bever-d.demon.co.uk
2008-12-05 09:39:42
788

Killed in Action. 31st December 1983

Niel Wiid
niel@systemiclogic.net
2009-10-24 12:08:12
790

This incident was 54 Bn/5 SAI Bn and the followup was performed by Berede 101 Maj Mense. I was at Eenhana at the time.

M Cronje
shipshapeusa@cs.com
2006-12-26 03:25:43
793

One of a squad of Parabats from 1 Parachute Battalion, he was flying in a SAAF SA-330C Puma helicopter, #132, which was transporting men from 1 Parachute Battalion, when the helicopter was shot down by enemy 23 mm AA fire south-east of Cuvelai in Angola, crashing inverted. None of the Parabats or SAAF crew survived. The Parabats who died that day are commemorated on the Wall of Rememberance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein.

Peter
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2007-12-31 05:05:17
796

My name is Corrie and I have just joined your website, some information on one of the fallen listed on your site. 

Lance Corporal Stephan Leamy, belonged to Regiment Piet Retief and was shot in the lung during a patrol near Enhana in 78, he died while waiting to be casavaced. 

His company was temp based at a school and a section was sent out to get water, they walked into an ambush of 65 ters, the section went down and returned fire killing three insurgents, during the initial fire Leamy took a shot in the lung, the signaller was grabbed and shot in the buttocks but he managed to escape. 

The patrols had a habit of following the same path every day on their water patrol, but on that day they veered from their route, the ambush was laid out in an L shape and they walked into the short leg of the L, neutralizing most of the longer legs fire. 

Leamy had a newborn child, I am sure this info can be verified by the ops reports of the unit, or the military

Corrie
4daddee@gmail.com
2011-05-09 08:21:19
798

Maruis was a crew commander of a Ratel 90 belonging to 61Mech in Angola during Op Hooper. Trained in 2SSB Zeerust. Marius was commanding his Ratel when the command came to visgraad (take cover under trees) when enemy Migs were overhead. A branch from the tree caught the browning mounting which came loose and hit Marius in the head. Marius was a great guy, always the centre of any fun.

Unknown
Unknown
2003-08-01 14:40:22
798I knew Marius - I was in Bravo company - 90mm Ratels, He was a really good friend. :/ - I remember the asccident, it still saddens me.
Craig
raven@aerosat.co.za
2012-04-02 08:01:02
798I trained with Marius in Zeerest, he was really an exceptional character - for his team leading, and fortitude. We got separated early in training, but stayed in touch, he always maintained I was the only gunner to hit a target cleanly at 1.3 clicks - he was right.
Craig
raven@aerosat.co.za
2012-04-02 08:13:29
800i was the medic.
we were standind roadblock between tokoza and kathlehong.was about midnite,car approached and as troops were going to stop car for search ,dimmed lights and accelerated .as past by us red traces filled the air from ak's.we all took cover i fired a few shots back at honda ballade with 9mm .call came over radio and ran to wounded soldier,was hit bellow left arm 2 centimeters from bulletproof .bullet hit back of sternum,tried cpr but was already deceased.
i will never forget that night ,god be with his family .
brent henshaw
ops medic
northern medical command
brent henshaw
brentair777@yahoo.com
2010-08-27 10:44:13
801

Steven was a section-leader in a special combat-engineering element of 1Para Bn. He died in a fire-fight in the South-West of Angola. He was an excellent soldier and a man of strong faith. It was an honour to have served under him.

Only the good die young!!!!

I will always remember and cherish his memory.

Unknown
Unknown
2002-12-03 16:05:43
801We shared the best of times during basic training. I salute you buddy.Edward
ehinch@gmail.com
2008-07-07 19:32:14
80122 February 1988: 84506179BG Sapper ( Acting Section leader) Steven Eric Lelong from 1 Parachute Battalion Combat Engineering Unit was accidently shot dead (mortar shrapnel) when a team of Combat Engineers were mistakenly ambushed by a 102 Battalion Reaction Force Unit in Southern Angola. He was 19Wynand H Fourie
whfourie@landbank.co.za
2015-02-12 05:05:42
804

Killed in Action (Tank took out Ratel)

4th January 1984

Niel Wiid
niel@systemiclogic.net
2009-10-24 12:19:59
807
Terry was with me at the Infantry School in Oudtshoorn in 1975. 
we were posted to 2SAI Bn Gp (Walvisbay) and we trained the next intake there until being posted up to the "OPS" area. 
we were sent to different sectors so I never saw him again. On returning to Grootfontein after our border duty, I was looking forward to seeing him again when we were told that the "Buffel" driver had fallen asleep at the wheel and the truck had rolled. Terry was the only one killed. I think he was 19. I walked around the hospital for a long time ...wondering if I should ask to see his body....to say good bye....but never did.      

Jonathan Balladon
jballadon@iburst.co.za
2012-08-08 19:58:03
807

CPL Leonard was a section leader when I did my 1 year national service at 2 SAI in Walvis Bay. We all went to the boarder together. Terry and his section stayed in the tent next to mine at Nkongo up North. He had a special heart for sharing the gosple with his men and I often heard him pray with his guys. After 4 and a half months living in the bush we came to the end of our stint in Ovambu and were retreating back to our base in Walvis Bay. We had not seen normal civilization or a tar road all this time. 5 km before reaching Grootfontein the accident happened. I travelled on the Unimog, 2 vehicles behind his Unimog and was shocked at the scene that lay before us as we came round the bend. Apparently the driver fell asleep and the Unimog rolled and landed at the side of the road on its roof. We comforted the injured, loaded their equipment, kit, rifles, etc that lay scattered around and took it with us to Grootfontein. Unfortunately we were informed that Terry had passed away. What comforted me in this sad situation was that he had such a strong believe in God, and that he went home to be with his creator.  It is now 36 years later and this sad memory is still clear in my mind. I salute all those who were with me in 1976 at 2 SAI in Walvis Bay. They were tough times with good memories as well as the sad loss of CPL Terry Leonard. From L/CPL Simon van der Meulen

Simon van der Meulen
smeulen@icon. co. za
2012-11-11 15:26:34
807

CPL Leonard was a section leader when I did my 1 year national service at 2 SAI in Walvis Bay. We all went to the boarder together. Terry and his section stayed in the tent next to mine at Nkongo up North. He had a special heart for sharing the gosple with his men and I often heard him pray with his guys. After 4 and a half months living in the bush we came to the end of our stint in Ovambu and were retreating back to our base in Walvis Bay. We had not seen normal civilization or a tar road all this time. 5 km before reaching Grootfontein the accident happened. I travelled on the Unimog, 2 vehicles behind his Unimog and was shocked at the scene that lay before us as we came round the bend. Apparently the driver fell asleep and the Unimog rolled and landed at the side of the road on its roof. We comforted the injured, loaded their equipment, kit, rifles, etc that lay scattered around and took it with us to Grootfontein. Unfortunately we were informed that Terry had passed away. What comforted me in this sad situation was that he had such a strong believe in God, and that he went home to be with his creator.  It is now 36 years later and this sad memory is still clear in my mind. I salute all those who were with me in 1976 at 2 SAI in Walvis Bay. They were tough times with good memories as well as the sad loss of CPL Terry Leonard. From L/CPL Simon van der Meulen

Simon van der Meulen
smeulen@icon. co. za
2012-11-11 15:27:34
808

Died in a Military Vehicle Accident, involving his section being transported in a Gladiator. There was a bad crash and fire, with the troops trapped in the rear. The army vehicle he was in collided head-on with a newspaper delivery van between Colesberg and Philippolis, on their way back to Ladysmith army camp.

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2009-07-09 20:17:29
808

13 Sep 1970: Six members from 5 SAI and one member from 3 SAI were killed while being transported in a Gladiator Troop Carrier back to Ladysmith Army Camp. Their vehicle was involved in a head-on collision with a Newspaper Delivery Van between Colesburg and Philippolis and the vehicle immediately burst into flames with the men still trapped inside.

The casualties were:

241
66458696N Rifleman Hilton Dudley Coker (3 SAI). He was 19.
528
65395287N Rifleman John Grinyer (5 SAI). He was 20.
808
6732700N Rifleman Peter Alfons Ernst Leonhardt (5 SAI). He was 19.
853
68238567N Rifleman Kevin Eric Mack (5 SAI). He was 18.
903
68444918N Rifleman Richard Neville Marriott (5 SAI). He was 17.
1088
68222322N Rifleman Gregory George Olyott (5 SAI). He was 18.
1448
68307446N Rifleman Mark Felice Vallero (5 SAI). He was 18.
John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2014-09-13 10:20:39
809

My name is Bobby Thomson. I was in Katima Mulilo that night. I was a gunner and served at the mortar locating radar (32 Loc Battery) which was situated on a tower next to the heli pad. The second red eye landed between us and the heli-pad . We then directed fire onto pre-listed targets along the river and in Sesheke and the guns at golf wiped out all their long and medium range weapons within the first 10 - 15 minutes after the attack. I remember that we were in a direct line between Golf firebase and some of the targets in Zambia. We would see the firing of the guns, then hear the shells come overhead and hear the explosions when they landed. Lt Schalekamp gave mopping-up fire orders the next day. The next day we went to look at the bungalow and what we saw remained with me for many a year after that.

Bobby Thomson
warringtons@eccsystems.co.za
2011-07-30 10:48:52
809 I remember it distinctly. The run-up to the attack was as follows: After the successful operation Reindeer and the battle at Cassinga or (Moscow and Vietnam) bases, SWAPO had to do something to save face and they came up with Ops Revenge. The strategy was to attack and annihilate Katima Mulilo, Wenela, Golf and Mpacha. A force of SWAPO and Zambian military personnel and equipment was gathered on the other side of the river and longer range weapons were positioned along the riverbank between Sesheke and their border post "Katima Mulilo" which was situated just across the newly scraped no-mans land from Wenela Base, which in turn was situated at the point where the Zambezi River turns into Zambia and the so-called Kaplyn started. I was a Gunner and at the time part of a mortar locating crew. We had come to the Caprivi around three months before and were first situated at Golf and Wenela. One day we were still quietly going about our business when the Genie invaded our camp and began to dig in the Ops room and other key buildings and positions. At the time we should have realized that something was happening, but no information was passed on to us. A couple of weeks later a third set was flown up from South Africa and a tower was built at Katima to raise the screen up on to. Our group was then moved to Katima and we began registering enemy positions along the riverbank using the Cymbeline Radar Set to do so. At that time, there were no known co-odinates that could be used to survey in any of our gun positions or those of the Radar Set which would be necessary to be able to give adjustments to the guns at Golf and/or, the mortars at Romeo Zulu which was situated out of town along the river. This was soon remedied as a surveying team arrived from SA and used the known co-ordinates at Mpacha as a base and performed what we called then "trekmeet" all the way from Mpacha to the Radar Platform at Katima, the base at Golf and the mortars at Romeo Zulu. At least we were now on the same grid. From these known points a map of the area was drawn and the co-ordinates of the enemy positions were registered onto the map. Seeing as the Cymbeline could also pick up any metal, we could plot the movement of motorvehicles and equipment across the river and even were able to plot dust roads and paths over a period of time as the people and equipment followed the road and the co-ords could be plotted. When equipment stopped moving and stayed at a position, those positions were listed as possible enemy positions and were registered as targets.This information was also updated onto the other maps at Golf and Romeo Zulu on a regular basis. One day, on the way back from Wenela to Katima, a SWAPO soldier walked out of the bush at the side of the road and handed himself over to us. He was bristling with weapons, had a new set of camo???s on and was fully kitted out. He said that he had been promised that he would be able to go to university in Moscow if he joined and spent some time with the ???Freedom Fighters??? . He stated that he had been with Swapo for three years now and that most of that time they had not had much to eat and that the promises that had been made were not realizing. His kit was full of food at the time, which was totally the opposite of what he was saying and he explained that they had just been issued with new kit, weapons, food etc, but that he had had enough and had decided to hand himself over. We took him to Katima and handed him over to the Intelligence Officer at the base and I believe he supplied them with some much needed info concerning the build-up of forces across the river. So we spent our days at Katima, waiting for the end of our stint. As was always the case in later years, the gunners and the guys from the armour regiments befriended each other as both were and would always be minority groups wherever we served. We played many soccer games against each other and so-doing some of us made some good friends with them. If I remember correctly, trooper Elworthy was an excellent soccer player and had been selected for some or other SADF soccer team as well. Our Radar set was situated at the North Eastern corner of the base and the armour guys were situated on the South eastern side. So, the days went by and we heard that the armour guys were going home. One night , just before their ???aflos??? arrived, the guns were fired at some ???targets??? on the Kaplyn as an exercise and I believe a donkey was killed by mistake. A week or two later, their ???aflos??? arrived and the armour guys had a braai on their last night, the 23rd of August 1978. We said Good Bye to them and they carried on with their braai. If I remember correctly, the guys that were leaving were told to bed down in the bungalows opposite the mess and the new guys took up their duties in the vacated positions. We all wen to bed and at 01h15 all hell broke loose. I remember waking up to a searing sound and then hearing an explosion not far from our position. This was the first 122mm red eye fired on us and it landed in a mielie field behind the base. It was most probably the fastest I have ever moved and we got to our positions even before the next rocket fell. To start the generator of the Radar Set, one had to get up onto the platform and start it there. I can???t remember who did, but the set was immediately started up and we waited for the next shots. From our positions we could hear the bang as the rocket was fired, see the flames of the rocket motor raising up into the sky and then the motor died . The second rocket descended and fell on the Bungalow opposite the mess. It broke through the roof and as per some armament specialists later, exploded about 1 meter above the floor in the bungalow. At that specific moment, many guys were either running toward the specific part of the bungalow where the missile would hit, or were leaving the bungalow. The reason for this was that the bungalow was designed with two exits, one on each side of the long side of the rectangular building, which meant that all personnel had to move to the centre of the building. It was exactly at that point where the rocket hit. If the rocket had hit the bungalow first or if a later rocket had hit the bungalow, there would have been far less effect. At the time, we only heard the explosion, but did not know the effect of it. With the radar up and running, we started giving through target co-ords to the guns at Golf. One of the prime targets was the ferry across the river on which SWAPO and the Zambian army were now ferrying troops, equipment and supplies across the river. I believe the guns took out the fully loaded ferry with the second shot, effectively stopping the stream of troops, equipment and supplies from reaching the near bank. I believe that this was most probably the most important shot of the battle and turned the odds in our favour. After that initial target, we gave through co-ords of all the registered positions along the bank and systematically wiped out the positions, one by one. During this period, we would hear the bangs of the rockets being fired, see the ???red-eye??? in the sky and soon learnt if we needed to take cover or not. Some writers about this incident state that it was mortar fire, but as a gunner, we were well aware of what shrapnel from a shell looked like vs the shrapnel we picked up the next day which definitely was not the same and was identified as coming from a 122mm rocket. I am not stating that there was no mortar fire, but the explosions around us were definitely from ???red-eyes???. About 20 minutes later, we had effectively silenced the positions along the riverbank and the guns started firing at targets around the town of Sesheke, which is roughly opposite Katima Mulilo on the far bank of the Zambezi. I remember that there was an officer that was either looking after the civilians or had quite a lot to do with them while bomb shelters were being built on the southern side of their houses. In the town there was a microphone system and he was consistently warning the civvies and appealing to them to move to the shelters and if they did not have one yet, to take cover on the southern side of their houses. He must have come from the Boland as he rolled his RR???s and supplied some sort of comic relief during these hours. We would listen to the radio and when the command to fire was given, look toward Golf. The night sky would light up, looking like an intense lightning storm, moments later we would hear the whistle of the shells above us and then hear the massive explosions as they hit their targets on the other side of the river. Experiencing that was and still gives me goose bumps. The unadulterated destructive power of those shells is absolutely awesome. I must say that after SWAPO and the Zambian army stopped firing on us, the effect of those shots coming over was extremely heart warming. The firing continued sporadically throughout the early hours of the morning as new targets were identified and fired upon. Lieutenant (at the time) Schalekamp, joined us and later climbed up onto the water tower to give us the co-ords of visible targets and corrections once the first shots had been fired. He spent some time mopping up wherever he found anything worth firing upon. Later that morning we were told that we could go and get something to eat and the bad news of the bungalow being hit was heard. On arriving at the mess and seeing the bungalow, my life changed in an instant. The bungalow was a mess. Parts of the building, kit, you name it, was strewn across the ground. There was a guy who had been appointed to keep the vultures at bay. At the time we did not know it, but ten of our friends and comrades had been killed and another 10 or 20 injured. There was blood everywhere. Most of the dead and injured had been removed from the area, but the evidence of the ferocity of the blast was to be seen everywhere. Standing in line for breakfast, the coffee can was positioned long before the food and guys would fill up their mugs while waiting for their food. While standing there that morning, some idiot pulled off a shot and everybody dived for cover with hot tea and coffee flying everywhere and burning some of the guys. We all sat and ate in silence and went back to our positions. What I had seen that morning has stayed with me all my life since. It has influenced many of my decisions in my life. In many cases the effect has been negative. The loss of life of those troopers that night, guys whom you shared a part of your life with, played soccer with, ate with, joked with, worked with, just suddenly gone, left a scar. The next day the follow-up went into Zambia and a day or two later they brought a truckload of bodies back. I wanted to see what these guys looked like and wanted to see their dead, possibly to satisfy a feeling of retribution. I walked over to the truck and getting closer I could smell death. I looked at these bodies, my enemy, and seeing them like that felt no remorse, no sympathy. They were all in various stages of rigor mortise and were later layed out on the parade ground for the intelligence guys to inspect. The base at Katima is quite close to a township and we were told that part of our tasks were to protect the local population. Funny though, that night there was not a single person in the township. They had known and I could not understand why they had not told us, seeing as new were their ???protectors???. For many years I walked around with an ingrown mistrust of all black people as I could not understand the issues. Furthermore, the fact that we had killed some of the enemy never made up for the losses we had had. It felt as if the guys that were killed died in vain. Especially after 1994. It is only now, and I thank Arn Durand for giving me the answer, that I can say the following: No, they did not die as part of a well known Op, firing on the enemy and walking away as heroes into the sunset. But, they died, running to get to their weapons, ready to serve their country, ready to take part in a battle that was never given a name, but surely would have been given one, had SWAPO and the Zambian Army been able to succeed in their strategy of retribution for Cassinga. KJ BIGGS, HW DE LANGE, AH ERASMUS, GP ERASMUS, JL LESCH, JJR SCHUTTE, GJ SMIT, WS SMUTS, AD VAN DER MERWE, DM ELWORTHY, WHC BRITZ Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres, There is music in the midst of desolation And a glory that shines upon our tears. They went with songs to the battle, they were young, Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted; They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them. They mingle not with their laughing comrades again; They sit no more at familiar tables of home; They have no lot in our labour of the day-time; They sleep beyond Englands foam.Bobby Thomson
warringtons@eccsystems.co.za
2015-08-06 04:06:00
812

As part of Operation Askari in 1983/1984, the first attack by South African mechanised infantry on Cuvelai began on the morning of 31 December 1983. During the initial assault an 81mm mortar platoon and the artillery were tasked to provide indirect fire support. The South Africans, who were not visible directly from the Cuvelai base, were met by intense 23mm fire. The officer in command of the mortar section, Second Lieutenant P.M. Liebenberg, lifted the mortar fire by 50 metre leaps to try and suppress this fire, but shortly after the beginning of the attack, the mortars suddenly became quiet as an enemy 23mm gunner hit the tower of Liebenberg's Ratel, fatally wounding him.

Peter
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2008-05-31 16:45:28
812

Piet was 'n stil voorbeeldige leier. Lt Anton Melck het net oor die radio gese "Moenie vir Piet roep nie-hy is nie meer daar nie"

Johan v/d Spuy
jvdspuy@hotmail.com
2008-06-04 15:08:31
812

Killed in Action (23mm in the head) 31st December 1983

Niel Wiid
niel@systemiclogic.net
2009-10-24 12:11:25
81228 Jaar vandag.Mag ons jou nooit vergeet nie!Rus in vrede
Johan v/d Spuy
jvdspuy@hotmail.com
2011-12-30 23:01:12
814

On May 13 1985, a South African Navy strike craft carrying the Recce team as well as a back-up team left Saldanha Bay and traveled to a spot 160 kms off the Angolan coast near its border with Zaire.

The mission was to confirm the existence of ANC terrorist bases and SWAPO bases near Cabinda. Reports indicated this area as containing a major ANC training base from which insurgents returned to South Africa. The area contains oil storage installations run by the Angolans and Gulf Oil, and because of this, several large military bases are in the vecinity. Speculative reports had mentioned US Veterans and ex-SAS guarding the installations.

The plane brought the soldiers close to the coast in the darkness of May 19. An advance scouting party was sent to gather intelligence on terrain where the party would land, rowing ashore in rubber dinghies. No hostile movement or activity was noticed so the rest of the team landed on the night of May 20th. Under ideal cloudy skies, the Recce teams trip was slowed by the need to launch their boats farther from shore than anticipated. The longer journey, as well as rough seas threw off the precise timing of the mission. Near shore, Capt. du Toit noticed a small fishing vessel in the area of the landing zone and the occupants were on shore around a fire. This forced the team to wait off-shore until the boat left the area. They were now three hours behind schedule, and the danger of being detected grew. Upon landing the boats were hidden and a rendezvous point set up.

The men climbed a bluff and followed a route that skirted a small village and led to a road. They miscalculated the distance to the road and turned back losing an hour of valuable time. Du Toit decided to continue and reach the lay over position in a densely wooded area within the two hours prior to dawn. South African Intelligence and aerial photographs showed an uninhabited area, but in fact it was surrounded by camouflaged FAPLA bases. The hide was finally reached as day broke. This proved to be far from ideal as a hiding place as it was not part of the jungle but an island of dense growth some distance from the jungle.

The Recce's hid in the undergrowth and spread into a defensive perimeter, one man at an observation post several yards to the North with a view of the course they had traveled. As dawn broke, the features of a well hidden FAPLA base became clear some 1,000 yards from the hide position. A few hours later, a small FAPLA patrol could be seen following the tracks they had left the night before. They team watched as the patrol withdrew, and then came back with a larger patrol which passed the hide. At 5:00 pm a three man patrol followed the team's trail directly to the thicket where the Recce's were hidden. They stopped short of entering the brush, and returned to their base. Meanwhile a second patrol approached the hide from the other direction, and opened up heavily on the hidden position. As RPG rockets struck their position Capt. du Toit ordered the withdrawal of his troops.

They had no choice but to double back on the trail that brought them to this position the previous night. Two of the men were wounded as they exited the trees. FAPLA troops deployed 50 yards west of the site opened up with RPD machine guns RPG and many AK-47s. The team turned north, pursued by FAPLA soldiers. Another group of Angolan soldiers advanced from the west, flanking the Recce's, they could only go east now. They could see a group of trees, but needed to cross 40 yards of waste high grass to get to this cover. Du Toit took two men and made his way through the grass as the rest of the team hid in the thicket. The small team drew fire as over 30 troops moved onto the exposed position. Corporal van Breda was killed as his two comrades fought on. The fighting continued for a full 45 minutes. The two men started to run out of ammunition and were wounded. Corporal R.R. Liebenberg was killed, and du Toit nearly so, though he remained conscious. The contact was over, and two of South Africa's finest soldiers were dead.

While du Toit lay on his stomach, FAPLA soldiers approached thinking he was also dead. While stripping his equipment, they realized he was alive and shot him through the neck. He remained awake with wounds in his neck, shoulder and arm as the FAPLA soldiers began to savagely beat him. The soldiers ranted that he was a mercenary, while du Toit explained that he was in fact a South African officer, which surprised the soldiers greatly, though they were unaware he was a member of the notorious Recces. After being abused, he was finally taken to Cabinda for medical treatment then to a Luanda hospital. The remaining six Recce operators carefully made their way north where they regrouped and made contact with their plane. They were picked up and returned safely to South Africa. Their escape was due in part to being ignored after the Angolans captured du Toit.

Unknown

2001-11-18 13:29:33
815

Read the book written by Piet Nortje for the story. 32Batallion The Untold Story.

Unknown
Unknown
2004-06-14 23:16:09
815

On 11 February 1985, a patrol from 32 Battalion's Charlie Company were in the vicinity of the Bale River, when their over-eager company commander took a short cut, against earlier advice from headquarters, and blundered straight into a well-prepared SWAPO base, manned by some 100 insurgents. In the 25 minute battle that ensued, Charlie Company suffered heavy casualties.

In all, 12 men from Charlie Company were killed in this action or died of their wounds soon afterwards, and many more were wounded. The seven fatalities in the inital contact were:

  • Lieutenant Dave Light (killed instantly by a bullet that struck him below his left eye).
  • Rifleman P. Kahete (severe schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman A. de Almeida (a gunshot that penetrated both lungs)
  • Rifleman P. Jose (multiple schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman K. Kalonga (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Rifleman J.C. Chihamba (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Lance Corporal J.A. Sachilombo (multiple schrapnel wounds, including to abdomen)

After dark, while the casualties were being moved to a temporary emergency base, another three wounded men, all suffering from massive chest wounds, died. They were

  • Riflemen J. Fernando,
  • M. Joaquim and
  • M. Chipoya.
  • During the night another badly wounded Rifleman, M.A. Kinguelke, also died. The final death was that of Rifleman M. Muema, who succumbed to his schrapnel wounds at 10:00 the next morning.

    Later, radio intercepts indicated that SWAPO lost 15 men killed and a number wounded in this contact, and a further two SWAPO insurgents were killed by Charlie Company and one captured when they approached the base on the morning of 12th February.

    Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-09 09:57:33
815I knew Lt Light at 8 SAI in 82 / 83 although not well and was saddened to hear of his passing. I have only now found out. I remember him as a fit Officer that trained hard. He was an inspiration. I also served time in Sector 10 and on the Claymore Ops (Afskeur). Salute and RIP Lt Light.Wayne
wayneforrester7@gmail.com
2015-01-27 00:20:57
815MY BYNAAM WAS ANNA VAN GRAAFF RIENET EK HET SAAM MET LT LIGHT EN SERSANT SEYER GEDIEN VIR ONGEFEER NEGE MAANDE IN SEKTOR 10 ONS WAS OP MANNENE BASIS VIR GERUIME TYD .EK HET DAWID GEDIEN HY WAS N BAIE FISIEKE STERK PERSOON .HY HET N SAK VOL ENERGBARS IN SY KIT GESTOOR HY HET MET ONS UITGERUIL CORNBEEF HASH VIR MINT BARS .ONS HET TWEE GELEENTHEDE MET SWAPO GEKONTAK HY DAWID WAS NIE BANG VIR KONTAK MAAK ONS WAS BAIE SUKSES BEHAAL ONDER SY LEIRSKAP HY KON NIE AFRIKAANS BEMAGTIG NIE EN ONS HET HOM MAAR AALTYD IN SY TEENWOORDIGHEID MET HOM ENGELS GEPRAAT .ONS WAS FOXTROT KOMPANIE PELETON 4 EK WAS SY MAG GUNNER HY HET NIE BAIE GEPRAAT NIE HY HET VAN ZIMBABWE WEERMAG AS N KAPTEIN OOR NA SAW EN SEUNS AS N VOL LUITENANT .DAWID WAS N BAIE VERSIGTIGE PERSOON .HY HET NIE DIE TERREIN GEKEN DAAROM HET HY ONS AALTYD GEVRAA ARE WE SURE WE WIL MAKE CONTACK HY HET VIR MY GEVRAA OM GEBED EN SKRIFLESING IN DIE VELD HY HET GEREELD SY KLEIN BYBEL IN DIE VELD GELEES HY HET MY BAIE UITGEVRAA OOR VOORRIGE KONTAKTE DAN HET HY MOOI GELUISTER NA DIE FOUTE WAT VERMY KON WORD .AS WAS BAIE STRENG MET WAGBEURTE IN DIE NAG ONS MOES BY HOM GAAN SIT AS ONS IN DIE VELD OP N OPS WAS .ONS HET NIE TEE GEPRAAT HY WAS N GENTEL GIANT HY HET VIR MY GEVRAA OM SAAM MET HOM NA 32 BAT TE GAAN AS ONS UITKLAAR HY SAL MY HELP OM KORTTERMYN AANTESLUIT EK HET DIT OORWEEG MAAR WAS OOK AL BY DAARDIE TYD GATVOL VIR SAW EN SEUNS EK ONTHOU DIE DAG TOE ONS BY HOM MOES UITKLAAR SY HART WAS SEER HY MOES TOE N NUWE INNAAME WEER LEER VERTROU IN HOM SIT MAAR DAAR WAS N TYD OM AANTEBEWEEG ONS WAS MOS MAAR SOLDAATE EN COWBOYS DONT CRY .EK HET KONTAK VERLOOR NA UITKLAARING MAAR BAIE AAN HOM GEDINK EN HET PARTYKEER GEDINK HOEKOM HET EK MAAR NIE GEBLY OM HOM TE ONDERSTEUN .MAAR DIT IS NOU MAAR SOOS DIE WINDE VAN DIE LEWE WAAI .EK HET VAN SY AFSTERWE GEHOOR DEUR N VRIEND EK EN MY OORLEDE VROU HET IN ONS MOTOR GEKLIM EN OPGERY PRETORIA OM SY NAAM OP DIE KLIP TE GAAN SIEN EN VIR MY ANDER MEDE SOLDAAT VRIENDE GROETE TE BRING BERRINGTON VAN PORT ELIZABETH .BLIKKIES BLIGNAUT SAAM IN FOXTROT KOMPANIE DAPPER SOLDAATE MET WIE EK MY LEWE KON VERTROU ONS SALUEER U GROETE ANNA CORRIE BREYTENBACH CA BREYTENBACH
cabreytenbach@gmail.com
2014-08-18 16:29:26
816

Raymond was a Paratroper who had attended Pinetown Boys' High School.

His best friend at school, Hughes De Rose was also a Paratrooper and they served together in The Operational Area.

During a fire fight with SWAPO terrorists, one of these boys was badly injured. The details are sketchy, and when one of them went back to assist the other, both were killed.

These boys were of the highest quality and ultimately laid down their lives for each other.

May they RIP.

parabatchaplain@aol.com
Parabat Chaplain
parabatchaplain@aol.com
2003-05-12 16:46:57
816

Towards the end of 1987 two platoons of D Company (Jan 1986 ? Dec 1987), 1 Parachute Battalion were seconded to 5 Reconnaissance Regiment. The platoons were under command of Capt PA Pienaar (Pine), 2IC of D Coy and the platoon commanders were Lt J de V Kruys and 2Lt F J Wiese.

Together with members of 5 and 2 Reconnaissance Regiments, the members of D Coy took part in an attack on a Swapo base in central Angola. The operation was named Ops Firewood.

The attack commenced at dawn on 31 October 1987 and the SA forces only withdrew after dark on the same day. It was estimated that more than 300 Swapo fighters were killed during the battle.

At the end of the day Cpl N S Olivier, L/Cpl R M Light, Rfn H N de Rose, Rfn D W van Rooyen and Rfn W F Ewels were dead, killed in action. Several other members of D Coy was also wounded during the battle and Rfn J m Schuurman died on 1 November 1987 of his wounds.

Capt P A Pienaar the 2IC of D Coy who was in charge of the two platoons was killed in West Africa almost 10 years later, on 29 October 1997.

The names of these members of D Coy appear on the Wall of Remembrance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein.

We remember our comrades who paid the highest price on that day in 1987. They were all heroes and proud paratroopers.

Ex Alto Vincimus - We Conquer from Above



2003-08-28 14:17:03
816It has been 23 years, but not forgotten. 
Raymond and De Rose are are sorely missed. Both Pinetown boys. I served  the same years with you guys, in 1 Para, Charlie Company, and I have never forgotten.
Till we meet again, my friends, Rest in peace.



Lance Knepscheld
lanceknep@gmail.com
2010-09-06 15:06:23
816Ray was always larger than life always up to something, miss you a whole lot Ray 25 years today. Will not forget bud.



Craig Animal Davel
fultonmaintenance@gmail.com
2012-10-30 00:30:12
816Looking for a paramedic who was in Angola 1987 / 1988 name Eben. He saved the life of a young tiffie named Eugene who had malaria. He arranged for a helicopter to evac Eugene out. Eugene would like to get in touch with Eben.Linda
linda.swarts24@gmail.com
2015-07-08 00:32:50
817Mark died in a handgranade accident after a tent caught fire. The fire was caused by a candle that fell over. He tried to extinguish the fire when the handgranade exploded and he was hit by schrapnell in the abdomen. Undururundu Kaokoland Circa November 1985Mark Harris
mharris63@telkomsa.net
2008-11-02 15:18:22
818Also listed on the 4 SAI Memorial. John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2005-12-15 05:17:55
818

One of a squad of Parabats from 1 Parachute Battalion, he was flying in a SAAF SA-330C Puma helicopter, #132, which was transporting men from 1 Parachute Battalion, when the helicopter was shot down by enemy 23 mm AA fire south-east of Cuvelai in Angola, crashing inverted.

None of the Parabats or SAAF crew survived.

The Parabats who died that day are commemorated on the Wall of Rememberance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein.

Peter
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2007-12-31 05:07:15
819Niel was part of Papatroop an Eland90 troop during Operation Savannah. What happened to young Niel was that, on the morning of November 23rd 1975 (referred to by the survivors as ?Bloody Sunday,?) his armoured car was hit as it came down a slope towards a bridge over the Massaba River, some 70 kilometers north of Cela. Niel (who was the driver,) was killed instantly, but the car continued its forward motion until it hit the side of the bridge and toppled over onto its side into the middle of the river. They troop commander and the gunner managed to escape some eleven hours after the car was hit after being terrorized by the enemy infantry trying to pries the hatches of the car open with their bayonets and later a crowbar. Niel's body has never been recovered and he was buried by the local population. The grave has been traced in the mean time (2006), about 1,5 km from the graves of 3 more South African fallen http://papatroop.tripod.com/1st_trip_1974.htm Leon
leonbez@lantic.net
2006-12-19 13:37:35
819In January 1975 we met for the first time Cpl Nevel Becheey introduce you to me and it a long story why this happen but you then taught me to play chess and although i never was able to beat you at chess I came close but it taught me to relax and to think ever move before you make the move and the both of us went to the Border in April 1975 to June 1975 and we saw our first action and war and then we went to Bloemfontein and home for 14 days and then back to camp and we then went to Angola we were togo home that week end but instead we went to war and you never came back and today you are still in Angola and I heard today that the SA Goverment have had talks with the Angola Goverment  about bringing you back home after 35 years and I ask my self do you want to leave were you are? and go home as that has been your home for so long do we as the living who donot know death and been dead and we know we all have to go there as we growe older  and we who are at home can chose were we are buried when we die But you never had that and in fact you were buried by your enemy and hopfully they gave you a pray may not we donot know all we know you lay in a grave for 35 years while I marched on in to my life and I have never for gotten that first chess game that you said check mate I salute you TRP LOMBAARD  Coenie Bekker
coenieb@topsecurity.co.za
2011-05-09 12:42:34
81971259428BC Kav N Lombard, 1SSB KIA EBO, Operation Savannah 23rd November, 1975Mark Goller
markantgol@gmail.com
2015-07-03 07:08:59
822On the 5th of February 1970, Capt. JJ Lomabard was shot in the back by one of his own soldiers. Sometime during the day Capt Lombard was inspecting the guard posts around camp Katima Mulilo. At one of the posts, Lombard discovered soldiers on duty drinking beer. He informed them that they would be dealt with on their return to camp. One of the soldiers concerned, informed his comrades that they should not worry as he "would take care of things." Unfortunately, no one knew what he had in mind. Later, Capt Lombard was eating his evening meal, on finishing, he exited the officers mess and was walking away from the general mess at which point, the soldier in question, rose from his seat, took aim with his rifle and shot Capt Lombard in the back. Capt Lombard died within minutes at the entrance to my tent.I Mack 4 SAI 1969 - 1970
iainkmack@gmail.com
2016-09-09 10:03:37
827He died in the vicinity north of OshakatiMagda Daffue
magda_jan@absamail.co.za
2006-06-16 22:19:21
827

My name is Gunther Mynhardt. I was stationed at Makalani base in Oshakati during this time. I was a platoon sergeant for the storm pioneers and was asked to do a final kit inspection before these men moved out on patrol. Cpl Lotriet asked me for a cigarette. I handed him one and we stood smoking together and just talking in general. Later that night the signal came through that Cpl Lotriet had been killed by friendly fire. I was sent to collect his personal belongings from the hospital in Oshakati. There was a sealed letter in the side pocket of his trousers. I sent this letter off in the post. I hope his last written words reached it's rightful owner. This was a very sad and unfortunate accident. He was a friendly and likable lad.

Gunther Mynhardt
gmynhardt@shoprite.co.za
2009-10-22 15:08:09
827I trained in 8SAI with Lotriet and was also promoted to L.Cpl after what was a very tough and demanding section leader course. Soon after that we were sent up to join the Border War in Northern Namibia; our role being as base protection in Oshakati; also based at that time at Makalani.

L.Cpl Lotriet was a genuinely nice guy. Being english speaking and from a rather privileged up-bringing in Durban I was sensitive to some of the prejudice experienced from some of the other guys; but never from Lotriet. Always a contagious laugh and a bit of fun, fair and very likeable.

I was shocked and saddened to the point of being one of my life defining moments to hear that he had been killed out on patrol. From what I had heard; first hand soon after the accident from the ops medic that tried to save him; the section was in protective circular formation at night when he had ventured out to a friend for a cigarette but had got disorientated and approached from the front. His friend fearing that he was the enemy approaching followed instinct and following orders shot without warning. 

What a shock and terribly tragic. Rest in Peace and after all these years may I take this opportunity to finally offer my sincerest condolences to your family. 
Brendan Shillington (L.Cpl)
shillton@btopenworld.com
2012-07-06 03:47:24
828

In the early hours of Thursday 18 February 1982, SAS President Kruger, oldest of the three Type 12 Frigates of the South African Navy, collided with the replenishment vessel, SAS Tafelberg. Both ships were severely damaged but TAFELBERG returned safely to Simon?s Town. President Kruger sank approximately two hours after the collision when efforts to keep her afloat failed.

14 men from Mess 12, Chief Petty Officers J B Booysen and W M G van Tonder; Petty Officers S A Bothma, G A Brind, R C Bulterman, G W de Villiers, E Koen, H Lotter, R A McMaster, R F Skeates, H W Smit, W R Smith, M B R Whiteley and C J Wium died in the collision and their bodies went down with the ship. A further two men, Chief Petty Officer D Webb and Able Seaman G T Benjamin, lost their lives after the collision and whilst abandoning ship. Of these last named two only CPO Webb?s body was recovered after being sighted by SAS Protea on the morning of 19 February.

See the full story in Three Frigates by Rear Admiral Chris Bennett SAN (Ret)

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2006-06-11 01:10:39
829As far as I know he was killed just North of the SWA/Angolan border by a single bullet while standing in the hatch of a Caspir. He was from 53 Bn in Ondangwa.

2001-05-30 13:37:59
829

He was struck in the back of the head by a single round that bounced off the hatch of the Caspir. It was early / mid evening and they were follwing up on spoor just North of Alpha tower. They were fired on and the Major was killed. They came back to Etali base and he was then already declared dead by the Doc. We brought him back to 53 to his wife that night.

Mark Davies
Mark Davies
mark_j9999@yahoo.co.uk
2002-01-11 18:28:40
830Tom was from 2 SAI Walvis Bay and in my section & one of my best friends, we always talked about having a holiday at his farm after this war. I was second in command of the section & worked with him and the bren gunner. He was the strongest in our platoon. The day he was killed along with a fellow soldier, we were playing Bridge. Another section corporal who had lost men came up to me & asked who our best soldier was. I immediately said Tom. He went with them to the other side of Bridge 14. An hour later we heard a radio message. One dead, One wounded. I just knew it was him. It should have been me. He was a brave man and volunteered with a couple of us to walk 12 hours through Cuban lines to plant land mines. To this day I think of him daily. My heart goes out to his fiance who never new what happened to him. We recovered his body the next day after one of the biggest battles of Operation Savannah at bridge 14. I'll never forget you Tom we went through hell and you were a comrade in arms. It wasn't our war!Vic Betteridge
vic@dreamweavervisuals.co.za
2008-05-08 20:38:19
832

29 Sep 1977: Four members from 4 SAI were killed in a friendly fire incident at Okalongo when a soldier who was watching the rear of the ambush position suddenly turned around and opened fire on his fellow soldiers. The soldier in question subsequently appeared in the Windhoek Supreme Court on a charge of murder but was medically diagnosed as having acute schizophrenia and subsequently declared medically unfit to stand trial.

The casualties in this unfortunate incident were:

  • 69206464PE Sergeant Jan Pieter Albertus Furstenburg. He was 24
  • 74413659BB Corporal Leslie Muller. He was 19.
  • 74281734BG Rifleman Jan Joachim Jacobus de Vos. He was 18
  • 74382862BG Rifleman Cornelius Johannes Lourens. He was 19
Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-30 11:38:03
83507 Sep 1992: 89280820BG Rifleman Johannes Lodewyk Bouwer Lourens from 4 SAI was killed in a Military Vehicle Accident at White River. He was 18.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-07 00:13:22
835I remember Rifleman Lourens and that day well. They were on their way to a signal hill when the SAMIL 20 they were travelling in overturned. I will always remember him as a soft-spoken gentleman.Charles Truter
trutercharles1@gmail.com
2017-01-07 05:39:07
836Wayne Peter Lourens b:07/05/1962, d:25/05/1982. Eldest son of the late TW Lourens & AM Lourens. Brother of DC Lourens and the late CL Lourens. Passed away after a botched medical operation at 3 Military Hospital Bloemfontein. Buried at Stellawood Cemetary Durban. Will always be remembered but never forgotten.Brother - Dean C Lourens.
dcl@mtn.blackberry.com
2015-03-26 01:14:36
837

Killed in Action (Tank took out Ratel)

4th January 1984

Niel Wiid
niel@systemiclogic.net
2009-10-24 12:24:20
838

Maj Louw was second in command of 8 SAI, Upington, Northern Cape. He was accidentaly shot in a night attack exersize. It was a freak accident and he was hit by a low aimed flair triggered by a fellow officer with the rank of Captain.

May he rest in peace.

CDD
cdedoes@iafrica.com
2006-08-31 00:11:34
838

Maj Louw was the 2IC at 8SAI and while on a training exercise at Riemvasmak outside of Upington, he was shot in the back of his head with a flare by accident by the Adjudant.

Pierre
purrroux@hotmail.com
2007-05-24 00:29:32
838Only recently stumbled upon this website.  The person listed in this page is my dad.  I was 3 at the time of his death.  His date of birth was 12 February 1954 in Pretoria.  Date of death was ?? September 1984.  His grave is situated in the military cemetary in Pretoria.

I will dig around for more info.

Thanks for this website.
EJ Louw
3.j.l0uw@gmail.com
2010-09-02 07:35:11
838I was honored to serve under Major Louw in 1981 /1983 at 8sai Upington. He was a fair and just officer. I was saddened on hearing of his death and often think back on the time i served in the Sadf under his command. It will never be the same....... RFN G A BERNICCHI
alan.sandton@dealer.renault.co.za
2010-12-07 20:31:03
838The then-Captain Louw was a company commander at 2 SAI Walvis Bay in 1981 when I was the signals officer. As a previous contributor stated, a kindly and pleasant man. RIP.
76595313PE
albannach2@btinternet.com
2011-06-17 09:45:17
838I was a Jan 1983 intake to 8SAI for National Service . It was baking hot and basics and beyond was hell for us at the time . Training was hard but looking back it made us into good soldiers . Some of the rank were most  unpleaseant and unnecessary so but occasionally there were some signs of decency . I remeber Major Louw as an energetic, motivated  Major who really got his troops motivated and was very firm on the job but very fair . He was well  liked, smart  and respected for the great manner in which he conducted himself and motivated others . No doubt he would have gone all the way to General .A great soldier and a good man . Remembering back , I  was very sad on learning of his passing and have thought about it subsequently . RIP sir Eric
ehatz@yahoo.com
2011-07-31 19:05:06
838Although nearly thirty years have gone by since i finished the army i remember Maj Louw as well. I was part of the Jan 82 intake and was in platoon 3 Charlie company. I remember Maj Louw as a fair and well respected Officer and i was sad to hear that he had died in such a tragic accident. Unfortunately many losses were due to accidents that could have been avoided.
Rest in peace Major. 
Wayne
wforrester@absamail.co.za
2012-08-02 07:33:06
838I was in the Jan 83 intake and remember this incident - Very sad. glenn
glen789@yahoo.com
2013-06-06 04:24:07
838I knew Eric quite well as I was his civvy Dominee in Walvisaai Meersig. He was a wonderful person and we remember him and his wife Elna fondlyDieks Theron
Dieks@DieksBru.com
2013-07-13 14:13:18
83809 Sep 1984: 70229240PE Major Erasmus Johannes Louw from 8 SAI was killed instantly when a fellow Officer accidentally shot him in the back of the head with a 1 000ft rocket flare during a training exercise at Riemvasmaak outside Upington. He was 29.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-09 00:26:34
838I was a cpl at that stage and was leading a night attack from a koppie on the base the night it happend. Training was called off via radio. RIPWillem Stadler
willemstadler62@gmail.com
2017-06-16 14:21:22
845Taken from a Story in the Natal Witness:

City Airman killed in N3 Crash

City Reporter

A National serviceman from Pietermaritzburg, Airman Craig Lucarne (19), was killed and four of his colleagues were injured in an accident on the N3 near Louis Botha Airport yesterday.

No details of the accident were available last night but a spokesman for the South African Air Force, where all five were undergoing training, said a Rhino military vehicle overturned.

Airman Lucarne was of Steele Road, Scottsville.

Those injured in the accident were Temporary Corporal K. Charvat (19), Airman D.J.M. Miller (20), Airman C.W. Delve (19) and Airman J.W. Vermeulen (19).

Temporary Corporal Charvat and Airman Miller were said to be in a serious but stable condition at Addington Hospital while Airmen Miller and Delve were slightly injured.

The South African Air Force spokesman said a board of inquiry had been convened to look into the cause of the accident.

The dead man is survived by his parents, Mr Alwyn Lucarne and Mrs Daphne Lucarne, and a sister, Mrs Sharon King.

John Dovey
john@justsdone.co.za
2002-01-03 21:43:24
845

At his funeral (at Boschoff Street Methodist Church) the church was packed full with his friends and family. I remember that his girlfriend had to be taken out of the church because she was hysterical with grief.. There wasn't a dry eye in the whole place. Craig was truly loved by everyone who had come into contact with him..
John

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2002-01-03 21:52:08
846

26 Sep 1982: 80594104CK Private William Henry Ludick from the Army Catering Corps was killed in a Military Vehicle Accident at Kuruman. He was 20.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-27 04:08:45
847He was shot and killed in action on the S.W.A. & Angola border while on footpatrol.

2001-08-09 00:55:46
847William Raymond Luiters was buried at the Robertson Cementary in the heroes acre, he and my brother were good friends. I remember him and his sister from visiting our home very often.I called my brother today and the first thing he said was that Raymond was a gentle but very bright guy,will put some flowers on his grave next time I passes there.  Pieter Swart
pieters@ladismithcheese.co.za
2012-04-01 05:07:57
853

Died in a Military Vehicle Accident, involving his section being transported in a Gladiator. There was a bad crash and fire, with the troops trapped in the rear. The army vehicle he was in collided head-on with a newspaper delivery van between Colesberg and Philippolis, on their way back to Ladysmith army camp.

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2009-07-09 20:18:21
853

13 Sep 1970: Six members from 5 SAI and one member from 3 SAI were killed while being transported in a Gladiator Troop Carrier back to Ladysmith Army Camp. Their vehicle was involved in a head-on collision with a Newspaper Delivery Van between Colesburg and Philippolis and the vehicle immediately burst into flames with the men still trapped inside.

The casualties were:

241
66458696N Rifleman Hilton Dudley Coker (3 SAI). He was 19.
528
65395287N Rifleman John Grinyer (5 SAI). He was 20.
808
6732700N Rifleman Peter Alfons Ernst Leonhardt (5 SAI). He was 19.
853
68238567N Rifleman Kevin Eric Mack (5 SAI). He was 18.
903
68444918N Rifleman Richard Neville Marriott (5 SAI). He was 17.
1088
68222322N Rifleman Gregory George Olyott (5 SAI). He was 18.
1448
68307446N Rifleman Mark Felice Vallero (5 SAI). He was 18.
John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2014-09-13 10:21:46
868

Anton Malan was a member of Foxtrot Company at Infantry School - Oudtshoorn as part of the January 1990 intake.

He was undergoing training as an officer and was in his 8th month of a 9 month Officers course. He was a qualified teacher, conscripted (in the manner most white male teachers were) and sent to Infantry School to become an officer.

He was killed in the final week of a Convetional Warfare training. During an assessment exercise, Anton was assigned to use a Multiple Grenade Launcher, offering support cover fire for a section doing 'fire and movement'. The weapon he was using malfunctioned, resulting in an explosion of the ammunition it contained.

Anton was in my Platoon. He was part of the Badmington team. A memorial was made on the site where he fell by his platoon buddies. This can be found at the following coordinates -

-33° 33' 26.32", +22° 11' 30.65"

 

Shaun Foster
sfoster@chandlings.com
2010-04-07 21:25:42
871

We were a section moving along the Yati Strip. A person who i idendified as an member of the SADF ran across the strip. The next minute all hell broke loose. It was later reported that we had been ambushed by 40 terr's. Malan was shot through the right arm ,stomach and left arm. He died 4 day's later,/p>



2005-02-02 21:49:06
871

I was in the Vickers Platoon. That ambush was laid for us at Onhunda. Malan was a friendly young man who I remembered as being a "really nice guy". We were all shocked and upset by his death. I wish that his nation had recognised his sacrifice more. May his soul rest in peace.

Roger Smith
info@dawnpatrol.co.za
2008-03-10 21:12:57
876

One of a squad of Parabats from 1 Parachute Battalion, he was flying in a SAAF SA-330C Puma helicopter, # 132, which was transporting men from 1 Parachute Battalion, when the helicopter was shot down by enemy 23 mm AA fire south-east of Cuvelai in Angola, crashing inverted. None of the Parabats or SAAF crew survived. The Parabats who died that day are commemorated on the Wall of Rememberance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein.

Peter
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2007-12-31 05:09:52
878

13 Sep 1987: Six members of 32 Battalion were Killed in Action in a single incident during Ops Modular in Southern Angola.

A 32 Battalion Anti-Tank Ratel 90, Callsign 13, Commanded by 2/Lieutenant Jose Raymond Alves became bogged down in a muddy shona while engaging FAPLA manned Soviet T-55 tanks. Before the men could extricate themselves, their Ratel 90 was hit and destroyed at point blank by a Soviet T-55 tank shell. The tank round penetrated the Ratel through the side door and detonated inside the main ammunition storage container. This resulted in an explosion within the Ratel causing the vehicle to catch fire. The Ratel crew and passengers were all killed instantly in the explosion. The burnt out Ratel was later destroyed by SADF Engineers to prevent its capture. Captain Alfred Desmond McCallum was the Commanding Officer of Foxtrot Company.

Those Killed in Action were:

  • 74316175PK Captain Alfred Desmond McCallum. He was 28
  • 83502815BG 2/Lieutenant Jose Raymond Alves. He was 20.
  • 83302422BG Lance Corporal Matthys Michael De Klerk. He was 20.
  • 832441178BG Trooper Marthinus Johannes Kuyler. He was 20.
  • 81533671SP Lance Corporal Joao Rodrigues Mananza. He was 33.
  • 76928621SP Lance Corporal Waite Tchipango. He was 31
Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-15 02:02:51
879

On the evening of 3 April 1983, the first and fourth platoons from 32 Battalion's Alpha Company were preparing to set an ambush on a road four kilometres north-east of Vinte Sete, when they spotted six SWAPO insurgents moving ahead of them. They were spotted in turn and the SWAPO men managed to run to cover in a more favourable position, before opening fire on Alpha Company, pinning the latter down for some 15 minutes and inflicting a number of casualties on them before withdrawing under cover of an 82 mm mortar bombardment.

The combat had definitely ended in favour of SWAPO on this occasion, as Alpha Company suffered two fatalities, Sergeant A. Mande and Rifleman J.D. Kativa, whilst 11 other members were wounded, including both platoon commanders, 2nd Lieutenants A du Plessis and G.W. Roos.         

Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-08 13:19:26
880Teixeira MANGANHES was killed on active service when Puma 155 crashed shortly after takeoff. Date of death 27 Dec 1983 during Op Askari. He was a mortar man in 32 Bn and is buried in the Buffalo Cemetry. F von Solms
solms.net@gmail.com
2015-07-27 23:28:16
881Grant Mann and another gunner were changing a wheel on a vehicle in the transport park (TPT) at the 10 Artilery Brigade in Potchefstroom, when the wheel exploded and sent one of the split pieces of the rim flying through the air, both of them were injured, Grant unfortunately didnt survive the incident. I did basics with Grant in 144 battery, of 14 artilery regiment. Grant was one of the reasons why I joined the Ops Medics, I was hen sent to Pretoria to train as a medic, I returned to Potchefstroom after qualifying, I left the army in 1992. I have been in the medical field now as a paramedic for 22 years, Grant was my inspiration in becoming a Paramedic. I give credit to him that I chose this career. His loss at the time was very traumatic as I had never lost a close friend before let alone a friend in such a traumatic way. Our unit was very saddened by his loss. Grant was a very happy go lucky kind of person, I still remember this after 22 years it goes to show the impact he had at that time of my life. Ryan Palmer
ryanpalmer911@gmail.com
2012-10-23 00:34:00
881I recall clearly the accident in the vehicle yard, it happened right infront of me, Grant and another gunner were removing a G5 Cannon tractor wheel when the split rim exploded,both had severe facial injuries. I ran all the way up to the main enterance to alert the Medics,who responded and called a ambulance from Potch. Grant died from his injuries,our whole battery 144 went to his funeral, I clearly recall his sister,she was devistated. I would really like to know what happened to the guy that was also involved in the accident, we were good friends, I never saw him again afterwards. I have a photo or two of us all in LohatlaJason Ward
jay@laz.co.za
2013-02-03 22:56:29
886

Goodman sadly passed away in September 1992 during Navy training exercises conducted by SAS Jalsena which was a Navy training unit situated in Durban, the unit subsequently closed down at the end of 1992. The incident was surrounded in controversy due to the Naval commanders being accused of being harsh and punishing during this exercise. It is not known what came of the investigation. May Goodman's soul rest in peace

anonymous
anonymous@anonymous.com
2009-11-21 20:33:15
888Thsi brave mans story is the same as Tom Lotze he was wounded at bridge 14 and because of a helicopter pilot saying it was to dangerous to cross the river had to be carried until on our side where he was eventually taken to Cela where he passed away while undergoing surgery.Vic Betteridge
vic@dreamweavervisuals.co.za
2008-05-08 21:07:58
889Lt Dewald (Wallie) Marais as the pilot and his navigator, 2nd Lt Owen Doyle, were killed on 14 March 1979 when their aircraft, Canberra 452, crashed in Angola after a low level Alpha bomb attack on Ediva at 17h00 as part of Ops Rekstok. They were flying as No 2 in the 4-ship formation when Wallie was hit as we bombed the target. With Wallie fatally injured and hanging limp in his ejection seat harness over the flight controls, the aircraft turned for base with Owen Doyle trying to fly the aircraft from the navigator crash seat from where he had no outside view or radio communication with anybody. At 17h15 the No 3 in the formation, who detached to shadow the limping aircraft, reported that the aircraft stalled, crashed and exploded.
May your souls rest in peace.   Riem Mouton - strike leader, 12 Squadron.
Lt Col Riem Mouton, SAAF
topaz@kingsley.co.za
2013-07-29 03:58:24
895

My brother was killed accidentally whilst on a flight out of Port Elizabeth - 6 Squadron.

The canopy hinge of his Impala Mk 1 broke resulting in the locking mechanism impacting his helmet and either rendering him unconcious or killing him instantly.

This occurred at approx. 11,000 AGL and terminated in an almost vertical impact with the ground between Steytlerville and Uitenhage.

A tragic loss at the age of 22.

Unknown

2004-10-27 20:37:16
899Sgt Maritz was killed in a Mig attack during the period of Ops Modular, Hooper and packer, while on detached duty to 6 Signals Unit. He was a member of the SACS

2006-10-14 13:35:25
899My brother my hero. You lived for the cause. Loved your country more than most. You were a special one. Miss you dearly. We will rise again!

eksteen maritz
em@tca.ie
2013-01-18 17:28:50
900

HANS WAS IN PELETON 4. A-KOMPANIE. 3SAI. HY IS OORLEDE TERWYL ONS BESIG WAS MET GRENSDIENS.

AL Matthee
Amandre@mweb.co.za
2011-04-03 12:44:56
900 Hans was killed by antie personel land mine while we were on patrol.Andre Matthee
Amandre@mweb.co.za
2012-04-22 12:34:15
900 Hans was killed by antie personel land mine while we were on patrol.Andre Matthee
Amandre@mweb.co.za
2012-04-22 12:34:44
903

Richard Neville Marriott [born 22/11/1952] attended Glenwood High School, Durban from 1965-1969. He was killed, together with John Grinyer, Peter Leonhardt, Gregory George Olyott, Kevin Mack, Mark Felice Vallero and Hylton Dudley Coker when their army vehicle collided head-on with a newspaper delivery van somewhere between Colesberg and Philippolis, on their way back to Ladysmith Army Camp.

Unknown
Unknown
2001-05-30 13:37:59
903

13 Sep 1970: Six members from 5 SAI and one member from 3 SAI were killed while being transported in a Gladiator Troop Carrier back to Ladysmith Army Camp. Their vehicle was involved in a head-on collision with a Newspaper Delivery Van between Colesburg and Philippolis and the vehicle immediately burst into flames with the men still trapped inside.

The casualties were:

241
66458696N Rifleman Hilton Dudley Coker (3 SAI). He was 19.
528
65395287N Rifleman John Grinyer (5 SAI). He was 20.
808
6732700N Rifleman Peter Alfons Ernst Leonhardt (5 SAI). He was 19.
853
68238567N Rifleman Kevin Eric Mack (5 SAI). He was 18.
903
68444918N Rifleman Richard Neville Marriott (5 SAI). He was 17.
1088
68222322N Rifleman Gregory George Olyott (5 SAI). He was 18.
1448
68307446N Rifleman Mark Felice Vallero (5 SAI). He was 18.
John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2014-09-13 10:23:04
904

One of a squad of Parabats from 1 Parachute Battalion, he was flying in a SAAF SA-330C Puma helicopter, # 132, which was transporting men from 1 Parachute Battalion, when the helicopter was shot down by enemy 23 mm AA fire south-east of Cuvelai in Angola, crashing inverted. None of the Parabats or SAAF crew survived. The Parabats who died that day are commemorated on the Wall of Rememberance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein.

Peter Chapman
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2007-12-31 05:10:47
906Lieutenant K Martin was killed when the Alouette II he was piloting hit high tension wires in du Toit's kloof on 17 th August 1962. Killed alongside him was the flight engineer Sgt AR Foote.Eugene Griessel

2005-12-07 16:37:40
906 Lt K Martin was educated at Jeppe High School for BoysPeter Bell
peterb@komatsu.co.za
2012-01-24 11:39:55
908His name was Rudi Marx. He was in HTS Middelburg before he joined the SADF. If I am not mistaken was KIA at Cuito Canavale in 1986. Was laid to rest with full Military honours in Middelburg, Transvaal. The whole town and school attended. I know, I was there.Vince Calonne
vincecalonne@yahoo.com
2010-08-29 14:45:00
909

Operasie Kropduif (die aanval op Eheke) op 28 Oktober 1977, sou die donkerste dag in die geskiedenis van die Suid Afrikaanse Spesiale Magte se bestaan wees.

Nadat die Suid Afrikaners aan Angola onttrek het in 1976, sou Swapo die geleentheid gebruik om operasionele basisse bykans teen die SWA grens te vestig. Hierdie basisse is vanaf twee groter streeks hoofkwartiere ondersteun. Cassinga sou die sentrale deel van Swapo se aanvalle op die SWA grens ondersteun, en Eheke die oostelike deel van Owamboland en die Kavango.

Daar is besluit om Eheke eerste aan te val. Drie kompanies van die nuwe 32 Batteljon sou te voet oor die grens, en Eheke vanaf die suide aanval. Op dieselfde tyd sou 'n groep van die Verkennings Kommando's, noord van Eheke afgeooi word, en met eerstelig die basis uit die noorde aanval.

Alles het van die begin verkeerd gegaan. Die Spesiale Magte is sowat 15 kilometer te ver noord uit die vliegtuie gelaat. Om dinge verder te kompliseer was die terrein plat en sonder bakens. Eers teen dagbreek was die verkenners in 'n situasie om sinvol te kon navigeer. Toe Drie Twee nog ook halfpad na die teiken, teen 'n verwoede Swapo mag vasloop is daar met reg gevra of die operasie nie afgelas moes word nie. Ook veterane soos Sers Maj FC van Zyl vra vrae. Die bevelvoerende offisier Brig Gleeson, in Rundu het teen die beter wete van die grond bevelvoerders besluit dat die operasie moes voortgaan.

Toe gebeur 'n volgende tragedie. Eheke het uit 'n groter kompleks bestaan as wat die foto interpretasie kenners raak gesien het. Behalwe vir die basis in die suide was daar ook 'n basis in die noord ooste. Hierdie kompleks is totaal misgekyk. Teen drie uur die middag loop die verkenners in 'n trop beeste vas. Die veld was bebos maar onder is die hout en dekking verwyder. Die bees wagtertjie wys na die loopgrawe voor hulle.

Die Operateurs vorm 'n linie met die ondersteunings groepe na agter. Aan die linkerkantste buite flank is Michiel 'Vingers' Kruger met 'n RPG, dan aan sy binnekant, Gert Eksteen met 'n LMG, dan FC van Zyl, Wentzel Marx met 'n LMG, Gary Walker met 'n RPG, Grant Clark, nog een, dan Antonie Badenhorst en dan Luit Chris Strydom. Aan hulle regterkant is nog groepe besig om vorentoe te beweeg. Dan bars alle hel los. Die seksie aan die linker flank het vasgeloop in die deel waar die basis se loopgrawe 90 grade wegswaai van die lyn van die aanval. In plaas daarvan dat hulle soos die res van die aanval die vyand frontaal aanval, loop hulle hulle vas in 'n vuur nie net van voor nie maar ook van die kant. Amper soort van verby die loopgrawe geloop!!

Hierdie toeloop van gebeure sou die lewe van ses jong mans kos. Letterlik binne sekondes. Die eerste om te val was FC van Zyl, die man wat die res van die seksie geinspireer het toe niemand meer lus was nie. Bykans op dieselfde oomblik sterf Vingers Kruger, die man heel buite op die flank. Tussen hulle twee stoor Gert Eksteen se LMG. Hy gaan sit op sy hurke om sy wapen se probleem uit te sorteer. Toe sy regterhand aan sy wapen raak, skiet 'n projektiel hom net bokant sy regter middelvinger deur sy hand. Sy wapen ook stukkend. Aan die regterkant gaan dit nie beter nie. Wentzel Marx, Gary Walker, Grant Clark, Antonie Badenhorts sneuwel almal. Luit Strydom word ook gewond. Gert Eksteen het nerens om heen te gaan nie. Hy haal sy pistool uit en veg met sy linkerhand verder. Op 'n stadium word twee van die ander groep deur 'n RPD masjien geweer vas gepen. Hulle kan hom nie raak skiet waar hy agter 'n boom le nie. Toe die gunner weer om die boom kruip skiet Gert Eksteen hom met sy pistool dood.

Met durf en determinasie veg die aanvallers teen die oormag en wen stukkie vir stukkie die stryd. Gert Eksteen is nie meer nodig nie. Sy hand bloei te veel. Hy beweeg terug, waar hy Kapt Meerholz aantref met 'n skoot deur die been. Hy help Meerholz so aba-aba terug na die mediese pos. By die mediese pos pluk hy sy middelvinger wat net aan 'n velletjie hang af en gooi dit in die Angolse stof. Sy hand word verbind. Hy gaan terug na sy gesneuwelde makkers en bring hulle een vir een terug.

Ek glo nie Gert Eksteen het die storie ooit vroeer aan enige iemand vertel, voor die Maandag aand in Januarie 2004. 'Ek het my hand by die werk in 'n ongeluk seergemaak' sou hy altyd se as iemand hom vra. Meer wou ek nie vra nie. Ek was op 'n baie persoonlike en privaat gebied. Maar ek is dankbaar. Helde almal van hulle, maar medaljes word ongelukkig nie in getalle toegeken nie, al is die dapperes ook 'n seksie van agt Recces. Hulle kon maar vir almal van hulle gegee het. Daardie dag is net 3 Honoris Crux toegeken. Corrie Meerholz sou een kry.

Leon
leonbez@lantic.net
2007-02-12 21:02:21
915

We were told of Mark's death the day afterwards. I was told that it had been an accident as the contact had been with friendly SWATF forces. Both patrols had been told that there were no friendly forces in the area so when they happened upon one another, the shooting started. My brother and 2 SWATF servicemen were killed. I was invited to the hearing in Ondangwa by the SAP who were handling the investigation and was told I would be contacted. The next thing I knew we read in the Citizen newspaper that no-one was found guilty of the error which caused my brother's death. I was furious. I had just left the SAAF after doing my National Service AND had actually joined PF to do Pilot's Course 1/81 but resigned. I contacted a friend who had been on Officer's Course with me, Lt Johan Loots, who was a lawyer and asked him to find out as much info as possible. After 4 months he told me that he had been warned off from the case. I never got to find out the whole story nor who had made the error. I never knew why the SAP never got back to me and I had to read about it in the local paper. Truth is all of the guys died for nothing because, a.) The communists were never the threat they were made out to be and b.) We could never hold on to SWA nor even South Africa coz "the times were a-changin'". Would still like to know why, though. Miss you, Mark. Dave Mason, Bangkok, Thailand.

Dave Mason
Unknown
2001-05-30 13:37:59
930This was told to me by the ops medic who was with them. On the morning of 4 February 1988 Lt Mc Cann and his team were waiting at the edge of a shona somewhere in the vicinity of Eenhana. He no sooner stood up in the Casspir to inspect the other side of the shona where they were supposed to go, when he got a direct hit to the face with a "Crossbow" anti tank grenade, a newly employed weapon at that stage. He was killed instantly.  He was remembered by this medic as a kind, responsible and loving young man and a good leader.

As I was the hospital chaplain at the field hospital at Ondangwa AFB during that period, it was my duty to take care of all the valuables of the dead.  In his pocket Lt Mc Cann left a note with a message that will forever remain in my mind.  To his girlfriend/fiance he wrote that he did not want to be part of the war  and the senseless killing anymore, but that the country needed him to be there. He spoke of his love for her and could not wait to be reunited with her.

He also scribbled a note dated on the day of his passing in which he said that he had a bad feeling about the day and that he wished that this was his last border service. (I hope that these notes reached his loved ones at the time) I found this note in a "Dankie Tannnie" bible.

Although I saw many dead and wounded people in my life, his death made a lasting impression on me. Through all my years as a "Dominee" his name remained in my mind.  I told many youth groups of the bravery of this man and his team.

I so wish that someone will post a photo of him so that he might be better remembered!

Lt Mc Cann, I honour your sacrifice for the country!
Ds WD Jonker
bananaboy@absamail.co.za
2012-06-01 06:14:23
931Lt Mc Guinness died in an aircraft accident after a partial engine failure.Unknown
Unknown@unknown.com
2008-09-06 16:23:40
931

Lt Mc Guinness was accompanied by Lt Diggle who was acting as his co-pilot. The aircraft crashed into trees while attempting a forced landing.

Unknown
Unknown@unknown.com
2008-09-06 16:30:03
931

23 Sep 1990: 83486357PS Lieutenant Sean James McGuiness from 42 Squadron was grievously burned when his Aermacchi AM-3C Bosbok, Serial No. 925 crashed at Potchefstroom on 12 September 1990.

He succumbed to his injuries in 1 Military Hospital on 23 September 1990. He was 23.

His Co-Pilot, Lieutenant Edward Diggle, also from 42 Squadron was killed in the crash.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-23 01:33:12
933

In the early hours of Thursday 18 February 1982, SAS President Kruger, oldest of the three Type 12 Frigates of the South African Navy, collided with the replenishment vessel, SAS Tafelberg. Both ships were severely damaged but TAFELBERG returned safely to Simon?s Town. President Kruger sank approximately two hours after the collision when efforts to keep her afloat failed.

14 men from Mess 12, Chief Petty Officers J B Booysen and W M G van Tonder; Petty Officers S A Bothma, G A Brind, R C Bulterman, G W de Villiers, E Koen, H Lotter, R A McMaster, R F Skeates, H W Smit, W R Smith, M B R Whiteley and C J Wium died in the collision and their bodies went down with the ship. A further two men, Chief Petty Officer D Webb and Able Seaman G T Benjamin, lost their lives after the collision and whilst abandoning ship. Of these last named two only CPO Webb?s body was recovered after being sighted by SAS Protea on the morning of 19 February.

See the full story in Three Frigates by Rear Admiral Chris Bennett SAN (Ret)

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2006-06-11 01:11:08
934

On 13 September 1987, during Operation Modular in southern Angola, a 32 Battalion anti-tank Ratel commanded by 2Lt J.R. Alves was engaged in combat with FAPLA T-55 tanks, and became bogged down in a muddy shona. Before the men could extricate themselves, their Ratel was hit and destroyed by a T-55 tank, killing all the crew and men aboard the Ratel, including 2Lt Alves and Capt A.D. McCallum, the commanding officer of Foxtrot Company.       

Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2011-01-11 13:07:08
934

13 Sep 1987: Six members of 32 Battalion were Killed in Action in a single incident during Ops Modular in Southern Angola.

A 32 Battalion Anti-Tank Ratel 90, Callsign 13, Commanded by 2/Lieutenant Jose Raymond Alves became bogged down in a muddy shona while engaging FAPLA manned Soviet T-55 tanks. Before the men could extricate themselves, their Ratel 90 was hit and destroyed at point blank by a Soviet T-55 tank shell. The tank round penetrated the Ratel through the side door and detonated inside the main ammunition storage container. This resulted in an explosion within the Ratel causing the vehicle to catch fire. The Ratel crew and passengers were all killed instantly in the explosion. The burnt out Ratel was later destroyed by SADF Engineers to prevent its capture. Captain Alfred Desmond McCallum was the Commanding Officer of Foxtrot Company.

Those Killed in Action were:

  • 74316175PK Captain Alfred Desmond McCallum. He was 28
  • 83502815BG 2/Lieutenant Jose Raymond Alves. He was 20.
  • 83302422BG Lance Corporal Matthys Michael De Klerk. He was 20.
  • 832441178BG Trooper Marthinus Johannes Kuyler. He was 20.
  • 81533671SP Lance Corporal Joao Rodrigues Mananza. He was 33.
  • 76928621SP Lance Corporal Waite Tchipango. He was 31
Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-15 01:53:06
934Vandag sou jou 58ste verjaarsag wees. 30 jaar sedert jou dood. Jy leef steeds in ons harte. Ek onthou jou so goed!Mariette Mc Callum Laubschet
mariettelaubscher@gmail.com
2016-12-28 00:00:20
934RIP Mac , how time has flown , remember you like it was yesterday. Vince
robinv@itdtaps.co.za
2016-12-29 21:00:32
93524 Field Squadron mine hunt sw angola march 1987 wounded in ambush by either mortar or rifle grenade casavaced and later died

2005-03-20 21:09:15
935Cpl MCGregor, he was Troop Sergeant for callsign ECHO 50, operating out of Oshakati, 25 Field Engineer Squadron. 12/1986-03/1987. KIA when our troop were ambushed during the morning of March 9th 1987 (if memory serves). We were on a mine hunt in southern Angola.Peter Norval
peter@norval.co.uk
2008-04-01 00:19:35
935He was my brother and I was very proud of him. If I think back of Wallace he would have been a very good soldier. RIP my brother, I will see you again.Robert McGregor
mcgregorrp@hotmail.com
2008-05-26 20:11:14
935

Wallace and I did our training together as sapper at Bossiespruit near Kroonstad in 1986. I think he was in Delta company, I did not know him personally but everybody knew who each other in the camp was as we were only about 90 that did RO'S in the end. We still remember him as a very kind and good person.  

Pieter Swart
pieters@ladismithcheese.co.za
2012-04-01 00:54:10
936Info I have is that Capt McLeod died in Impala crash in Magaliesburg area on 05 Jun 85 as result of inflight fireJohan Meyer
johanm@tsamail.co.za
2008-10-24 14:25:12
940Died in a motor-car accident in Limpopo.Herman
tracol@telkomsa.net
2008-09-17 20:22:31
94113 Sep 1988: 85269033BG Gunner Andre Meiring from 4 Field Regiment was killed in a military vehicle accident at the Army Battle school at Lohatla. He was 19.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-15 01:16:36
941I was sitting with him on the back of the gun tractor traveling to our next postion. There were 3 gun crew on one gun tractor. We all had fallen asleep. He was the best and fastest gun sight operator in the whole battery. I never forget that night.. Warren Peel
wrpeel@gmail.com
2015-12-27 02:25:17
942

Muller did officers training with me. He was killed when an RPG hit his Ratel. It seems as if there was a miscalculation of enemy position and the two groups stumbled into each other.

Greg Smith
wwgsm@woolworths.co.za
2001-09-10 11:28:14
942

Killed N/E of Calueque (S Angola) on 27 June 1988

Unknown
Unknown
2001-11-24 20:46:40
942

I was with Muller on the day he died. We were school friends and both became officers in our training year. We were together in Angola since late November 1997. He was a great friend and a fine soldier, very much loved by his troops.

Following a night of massive artillery bombardments by our forces on a town called Techipa we advanced in 3 fairly small groups towards Techipa. The thinking was that the Cuban/FAPLA forces will move south towards the then SWA border after the bombardment. They did exactly that but a group of infantry 32 battallion? was unable to inform us of their positions. Our 8 Ratel 90's drove straigth into them in an ope "shona". They first hit my 71A ratel with an RPG from behind. It was chaotic. Following that they struck Muller's ratel 72 and then also his 72C vehicle. I realised he was hit as he did not communicate on radio and his vehicle was reversing eratically.

I recovered his body and later passed it onto an infantary ratel 20 who had a body bag. The projectile hit his turret and then hit him full in the chest causing severe damage.

This year will be the 20th year since his death and I can still recall the day as if it happened yesterday. Fortunately no more people lost their lives as we were sitting ducks and had no protection and no support until we managed to break contact and collect all the solders whose vehicles were destroyed.

I salute you.

Herman Kitshoff
kitshoiff@it.bw
2008-03-12 10:44:50
942

Baie dankie aan almal wat Muller se nagedagtenis eer, so n wonderlike troos. Ons verlang nog steeds na 21 jaar en in ons huis en hart sal hy altyd bly voortleef as ons seun en ouboet. Ons lewe het so drasties verander, woon nou in Australia om by ons kleinkinders te wees.

Ek het onlangs die boek AT THY CALL gelees en het vir die eerste keer verstaan wat daar in Angola gebeur het. Dankie ook aan Clive Holt die skrywer.

My innige dank aan Hugh vir die mooi en gevoelvolle manier waarop jy die nagedagtenis van Muller eer, dit doen my mamma hart so goed om te weet daar is die wat hom onthou na soveel jare.

Hier sterf gereeld Ozzie soldate en my hart gaan uit na hul geliefdes, dit is n ewige seer.

Nogmaals dankie aan een en elk vir julle mooi bydrae.

Groete en liefde uit Oz,
Suzanne Meiring.
Suzanne Meiring
meiringjp@gmail.com
2009-04-01 04:18:49
945Lance Corporal C. I. Mennigke (Mil no: 71348213PE) and L/Cpl C.L. De Willzem(336) were killed in action on 4 January1978 in the Gaza Province, Mozambique, during operation Melon. Mennigke and De Wilzem were part of D Squadron, Rhodesian Special Air Service.
Information: Rhodesian SAS ROH.
Chris Bester
chrisbester37@yahoo.com
2010-11-28 16:25:07
956During the support of the attack on a known FAPLA position, the 32 anti-tank sqn was to lead the attack (starting at 06h30) with the tanks flanking left and right.  After many attempts, due to the dense bush, the 32 anti-tank sqn moved to the flanks and the tanks to the front.  After the 3rd attempt, the attack proceeded through the objective.  Duing all this time, the enemy had withdrawn across the shona and hard idea firing positions on their previous held position.  During the progress the column turned left, leaving the right flank facing the enemy (unknowingly).  During a debussing, we were sitting on top of the ratel drinking and eating when the enemy attacked.  Johan climbed through the gunners hatch, and I when through the side door (opposite the attack).  Once inside, Johan wanted to close his hatch.  It is at this time that the 121 mm mortar landed on the commanders hatch lip. Johan, unfortunately was in direct line of the expolosion.  Johan, you are not forgotten and never will be.Duncan
duncan.dabreton@gmail.com
2012-02-14 02:02:02
957

JT was at MLW (Mechanised Leadership Wing) with me at 1SAI. On the 11 October 1982, at Oshivello, during a familiarization with weapons used by PLAN, one of the soldiers pressed a button on a Russian grenade that exploded killing 4 soldiers.

  • Candidate Officer CASPER WILLEM JOHANNES GEUSTYN
  • Lance Corporal ALAN RODGER JONES
  • Lance Corporal JACOBUS THEODORUS MEYER
  • Lance Corporal EDGAR SYDNEY WESSELS
Doug Beveridge
dougbev@msn.com
2013-02-14 15:24:18
960

Maj R J Miller was the pilot of an Impala MkII Ser No 1008 that crashed at Pietersburg on 22-Feb-91 alledgedly due to pilot error whilst landing.

Johan Meyer
johanm@tsamail.co.za
2008-11-08 11:51:54
963

I do not know the exact circumstance of Jeff's death other than what we were told. The story is that after Tiffy's School he was posted to the Border. He was told to repair a tank, he jumped in, lit up his torch and the tank exploded. It was full of gasoline fumes. We heard that it took weeks for him to go. I think about him a lot. He was just a kid really, unruly hair, good natured. So sad. I suppose this story is better than a blank page. There seem so many of those. It is not fair but then again when is war ever.

David Nell
nellda@comcast.net
2010-01-20 06:56:04
964On 11 November 1987 the leading elements of Combat Group Charlie (4SAI) came under small-arms fire during the afternoon during their attack on FAPLA. They replied with their vehicle machine-guns, causing serious casualties. One Ratel of A Company found itself face to face with a T-55. The gunner, Rifleman Marius Mitton, had immediately started to fire at the tank with a cool and deliberate mind aimed at the weak junction between the turret and the hull. With his 20mm armour-piercing ammunition, he kept up his rate of fire until the tank started to brew and burst out in flames. Unfortunately though, another T-55 hit the Ratel of Rfn. Mitton with its 100mm gun, its 100mm projectile smashed through the windscreen and killed the driver of the Ratel outright with Rfn. Mitton fatally wounded. Rfn. Mitton realized that the Ratel was lost but not that the driver had been killed. He elevated the 20mm gun to allow the driver to escape through his hatch, and then tried to see whether the driver needed help, but could not see him in the smoking vehicle. He struggled out of his own hatch and fell off the Ratel. Several members of the section dragged him and the wounded section leader clear of the burning Ratel and gave first aid until they were evacuated. He died on 25 November 1987 of his wounds in 1 Military Hospital, PretoriaG. Rossouw
grossouw@wdsl.co.za
2005-12-03 17:45:06
964The Driver of the Ratel was Piet Schutte who died on impact.Danie Klonus
dklonus@gmail.com
2010-09-23 20:24:05
970

I think we replaced his unit. We were raced through to Nkongo base, 12 km from the Angolan border, where we replaced the drivers from Romeo Mike 16. The first team of drivers had been withdrawn, because one of them had died. The unit consisted of 27 Bushmen trackers, 6 drivers a sergeant and a lieutenant. The unit had been operating in Angola prior to our arrival, just above Nkongo.

May he rest in peace!

Garth Dibb
garth@gos.co.za
2006-11-03 09:15:26
970

We used to be good friends and I knew his family well.

As far as I can remember Willie was shot by one of his own when he wandered out of the "TB" (temporary base) one night to have a leak. On his return he was shot when one of the soldiers in the platoon thought he was the enemy. Tragic story. At the time he was an OPS driver for Omega although he was from 7SAI. His sisters are Erma and Karen, can't remember his parents names. All very good people.

RIP Willie
Herman vd Schyff
khudu@xsinet.co.za
2009-10-26 14:07:03
970

Cpl Moag joined us on an ops driving one of the Buffels of a Romeo Mike team.We were making our way out of the area following a contact had stopped the vehicle convoy overnight in a standard circular temporay base.Willie had been chatting with me and we had been talking about the Moon which was so distinct in the sky that night.Willie said good night and walked back to his vehicle where he had decided to sleep between the front and rear left wheels.I was just settling down to sleep when a shot was heard,Once we had established we were not under fire,the message went around the TB that Willie was shot.Willie had got up walked to the front of his vehicle passing the left front wheel ,had relieved himself directly in frontof his vehicle and was returning to his sleeping bag. A young tracker sleeping in line with Willies sleeping position woke, took fright seeing a person coming toward him and fired a single shot from an R1.I can only say that I believe the TB outlay was questionable that night.Willie had not wondered out of the temporary base.Technically the TB was not as it should have been in my opinion.Willie was a true friend and is always in my thoughts,I remember him so vividly when I hear Men at Work,"I come from a land down under".Gone but never forgotten my friend.

Lionel Endersby
****.co.uk
2010-07-15 23:18:29
970we were at school best friends.when i was doing my national service i heard of his death but did not believe it.i always had it in the back of my mind and when i visited the voortreker monument i looked up his name on the wall of rememberance.it was difficult to come to terms with it.he was a good friend.i knew his younger sister as wellleon du plessis
leon.duplessis1@sasol.com
2012-12-20 10:39:33
970we were at school best friends.when i was doing my national service i heard of his death but did not believe it.i always had it in the back of my mind and when i visited the voortreker monument i looked up his name on the wall of rememberance.it was difficult to come to terms with it.he was a good friend.i knew his younger sister as wellleon du plessis
leon.duplessis1@sasol.com
2012-12-20 10:39:43
978Maj B Moody was killed on 17/8/1977 at Upington. He was the pilot of an Impala Mk 1 doing a night flying exercise. His rear seat pax was Maj J Kerr. Maj Moody was then CO of 8 Sqn AFB Bloemspruit in Bloemfontein.

2003-06-19 09:54:55
979

One of a squad of Parabats from 1 Parachute Battalion, he was flying in a SAAF SA-330C Puma helicopter, # 132, which was transporting men from 1 Parachute Battalion, when the helicopter was shot down by enemy 23 mm AA fire south-east of Cuvelai in Angola, crashing inverted. None of the Parabats or SAAF crew survived. The Parabats who died that day are commemorated on the Wall of Rememberance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein.

Peter Chapman
peter.chapman1@gmail.com
2007-12-31 05:12:07
982

Date: 08/02/1982 at 09h30

Place: Calueque Barrage in the Cunene River 30 Km north of the SWA border in Angola.

L/Cpl EC Moolman and Cpl FC Rudolph were washed over the barrage weir. They were both caught in the current and the turbulent down draft caused by the fast flowing water pulled them both down.

With a great struggle Cpl FC Rudolph managed to swim out of the fierce vortex but L/Cpl EC Moolman was pulled down. His body never reappeared.

We searched the banks of the river for 3 days and nights using inflatable rubber boats and search lights. At night with in the search lights we saw many crocodiles on the river banks and on the islands between the reeds.

L/Cpl EC Moolman's body was never found.

WO2 JJ van Jaarsveldt
Johanvj@excite.com
2007-07-20 18:30:05
982                               

L/Cpl EC Moolman and Cpl FC Rudolph were off duty at the time and canoeing in a Makoro (local wooden dugout canoe) above the Calueque barrage. As explained by JJ above they were caught in the current and pulled through the furthest sluice on the North Western side of the dam. They both surfaced just below the sluice but were sucked back down again and only Cpl FC Rudolph resurfaced. We thoroughly searched the banks and islands for days after the incident but found nothing. A tragic accident.

Harry Osmond
rc.osmond@bigpond.com
2013-05-10 22:40:44
983Cpl F Moolman was killed, along with Capt. G Nel-Shawe, when their Alouette III crashed near Lourenco Marques (Maputo) on the 8th January 1966.Eugene Griessel
eugene@dynagen.co.za
2005-12-07 17:11:44
986

17 Sep 1987: 75584912PC Sergeant Rudolf Morris from the South African Cape Corps died from a stab wound received during an altercation with a fellow soldier at the Touwsriver Training Area. He was 29.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-17 14:10:24
990

RFN H.S.L. MOSS "MARNIE" WAS A MEMBER OF THE KAFFRARIAN RIFLES ON OPERATIONAL DUTY IN SWA DURING 1976 WHEN HE WAS KILLED IN A LAND MINE INCIDENT.

NUNC ANIMIS


2001-05-30 00:00:00
990 I was injured in the same landmine accident as Manie. The incident happened at approximatly 12h00 on the 26th of March 1976. I was told that Manie died before we were taken out by helicopter.Henrik Goosen
hendrikgoosen668@gmail.com
2012-02-28 08:57:52
991

Mostert died with less than 40 days to go on his service outside of the Kaokaland town of Opuwa late in 1983.

Mostert was part of the Mounted infantry unit (Platoon 2) attached to 1 SWA SPES.

Unknown

2003-02-16 22:10:23
991he died in a buffel accident
cpl barrie was his platoon sergeant.annyboddy know where i can contact cpl barrie
goldie
nantes@mweb.co.za
2011-03-01 17:15:50
991I would like to know if this  young man was Andre Mostert from Vryheid by any chance. I was a pen pal and then the letters just stopped. Never knew what happened. In his last letter to me he spoke of a donkey that was like a house trained pet and mascot?
 Plase let me know
Karen
kaysteyn@gmail.com
2012-02-05 07:41:18
993

Died in accident when buffel personel carrier overturned on the S.W.A. border while serving in the S.W.A. SPECIAL FORCES (SWASPES) Equestrian Unit

koevoet
jlofam@gmail.com
2008-02-24 19:46:58
994This was one of my friends and we were at the end of our term on the border, we were so young yet went and did a mans job! My dearest mate rest in peace,you have never been forgotten , not by me and not by your heartsore familyButch Coskey
bumpercars@telkomsa.net
2007-12-31 06:47:12
994Rfn. Mostert was killed near Alpha tower. He did his training at 11 Commando Kimberley. He was a mortar. The incident took place December 1979. We were on patrol near Alpha tower and one section was on guard on the tower.L/Cpl. Johan du Plessis
Johan.duPlessis3@transnet.net
2016-11-14 06:05:14
1003On 9 November 1987 during the SADFs attack on FAPLAs 16 Brigade, B Company of Combat Group Charlie was pinned down in front of the FAPLA positions and drawing heavy fire from assorted weapons A Ratel was surprised by a T-55 which appeared out of the bush less than 60 metres away. The Ratel gunner, Rifleman Adriaan Thom, placed some twenty armour-piercing rounds from his 20mm gun just below the tank commander cupola, some of which appeared to have penetrated, for an internal explosion destroyed the tank. The commander then ordered the infantry section to debus, soon after which the Ratel was itself knocked out by another T-55. The gunner, Rfn. Adriaan Thom from Ruyterwacht in Cape Town, and the driver Rfn. Muehlenbeck were both killed. One other member of this section, Rifleman P.G. Claasen, was killed by small-arms fire a few moments laterG. Rossouw
grossouw@wdsl.co.za
2005-12-03 17:37:32
1004

On 11 February 1985, a patrol from 32 Battalion's Charlie Company were in the vicinity of the Bale River, when their over-eager company commander took a short cut, against earlier advice from headquarters, and blundered straight into a well-prepared SWAPO base, manned by some 100 insurgents. In the 25 minute battle that ensued, Charlie Company suffered heavy casualties.

In all, 12 men from Charlie Company were killed in this action or died of their wounds soon afterwards, and many more were wounded. The seven fatalities in the inital contact were:

  • Lieutenant Dave Light (killed instantly by a bullet that struck him below his left eye).
  • Rifleman P. Kahete (severe schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman A. de Almeida (a gunshot that penetrated both lungs)
  • Rifleman P. Jose (multiple schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman K. Kalonga (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Rifleman J.C. Chihamba (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Lance Corporal J.A. Sachilombo (multiple schrapnel wounds, including to abdomen)

After dark, while the casualties were being moved to a temporary emergency base, another three wounded men, all suffering from massive chest wounds, died. They were

  • Riflemen J. Fernando,
  • M. Joaquim and
  • M. Chipoya.
  • During the night another badly wounded Rifleman, M.A. Kinguelke, also died. The final death was that of Rifleman M. Muema, who succumbed to his schrapnel wounds at 10:00 the next morning.

    Later, radio intercepts indicated that SWAPO lost 15 men killed and a number wounded in this contact, and a further two SWAPO insurgents were killed by Charlie Company and one captured when they approached the base on the morning of 12th February.

    Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-09 09:59:29
1010 2Lt A Muller was from 2SSB in ZeerustMike James
mjames0255@msn.com
2011-08-09 16:25:45
10102nd Lt A Muller, 72436728BC, was shot and killed in Angola , during Savannah, on the 18th January 1976.Mark
markantgol@gmail.com
2016-11-03 20:22:40
1012Life is very short.On the 24th December 1975, Muller TA on the 5.5 atillery guns ask me to get his bush jacket out of the landrover.We saw a lot of fighting that day.We start shooting about 10 the morning.At 12 the enemy start shooting back.Around 18:00 the OP shout "gate toe''.We all run for the threnches.He and Theunissen were killed by a ''Red eye'' rocket when the last shots fell.eddie doyle
doyleddie@yahoo.co.uk
2008-08-12 17:34:43
1013

Joseph Wayne Muller was born on 31 Janaury 1963 in Cradock to Muis and Lorraine Muller, the third child of six children. He was always the black sheep in the family and if something could go wrong it would happen to him. In his Std 9 year at Brebner High School, Bloemfontein he sustained a concussion in rugby and was hospitalized. He was in a coma and lost his eyesight. He eventually recovered but was unable to return to school for a while, after which he eventaully did. He was put on medication that he had to take for the rest of his life. He was determined to play rugby again and when the trials for the following year came up he asked our mother to take him to buy new rugby toggs but she refused. We lived about 10km out of town. This did not stop him, he got onto his bicycle and went and bought toggs and played trials. Returning home that afternoon he told my mom that God had touched his life and healed him and that he would never drink another pill again. In his Matric year he received full rugby colours.

I never saw my brother cry, except once. He had a tame chicken that would follow him around and always run after his car in the afternoon when he returned home from work. One day one of my mom's English bulldogs caught his chicken and Wayne had to put it out of its misery.

When Wayne was called up to the Army, he was very excited and being the type of person he was, he was fully prepared for what was lying ahead. He made sure he was fit and I remember how he slept outside in winter to get use to the cold. He did his basic training and immediately went to the Border. We only saw him on one pass during this time and he was extremely restless and could not wait to go back. In this time at home he made a point of visiting everybody he knew even going to see people that he had not visited in years. (After his death we realized that subconciously he must have known what was lying ahead for him). He returned to the Border never to come back. On 27 August 1983 my mother was sitting in bed the evening and reading her Bible, she is a dedicated Christian, when suddenly she started trembling. She told God that He was not a God of confusion and asked Him to give her peace, and He did.

On the Sunday 28 August we had a family day on our family farm and the whole congregation spent the day with us. During the course of the day our Minister called my Dad aside and spoke to him after receiving a phone call. My mom and I were in her bedroom changing nappies of the babies from the congregation. When she saw my Dad she thought that something had happened to her Bulldogs but when my Dad said it was not so, she knew it was my brother. He had died the previous night when she was praying. It all seemed so unreal and you always think it cannot happen to you until it does. We thought it was a dream and nobody slept for days. We only believed it to be true, when we saw it on the news on TV. Because Wayne was a Recce we were given no information surrounding his death, this we would only find out later. The funeral took place on the following Friday as his remains were to be flown out from Angola. Initially we were not allowed to see his body because of the injuries he had sustained. My father was determined and because his face was unscathed we were able to see what was left of him. We had a semi military funeral for him on the farm Kleinfontein. An army unit from Grahamstown were there and it was a beautiful service, that was held in the barn on the farm. The service was recorded and three quarters of the young men from Grahamstown dedicated their lives to Jesus at his funeral. They all commented that there was LIFE and not death at his funeral. Wayne was a very keen horseman and afterwards when we listened to the tape we noticed that everytime Wayne's name was mentioned his horse Steiger Fire Cracker reined in the backround. He wanted to go into the Ministry after the Army and even in his death he was serving God. My dad had a vision of what had happened to Wayne when he was killed, this would be confirmed by a stranger later. When we packed out Wayne's things, we came across his pills that he had to take for his concussion and the expiry date on them was the same month and year he died.

At the time I was an ATC at George Airport, but because of the loss of my brother, I decided to return to Cradock. My father came and fetched my things about three weeks later. On his return to Cradock he noticed a soldier with his arm in a sling next to the road and gave him a lift. They started speaking and my dad enquired about his injury. The soldier mentioned that he was in combat with the two soldiers that had been killed three weeks ago. My dad told him that his son was one of them. He recounted the story and my fathers' vision was confirmed. On the border Wayne was known as the Black Mamba due mainly to his pitch black hair but also because he was extremely hairy. Wayne was dedicated to God, the unknown soldier recalled that the one thing he would always remember about him was that he prayed for everbody every evening, mentioning them each by name and for spesific things example Piet' blisters or whatever.

Wayne was stationed at 54 Battalion, Eenhana. They were on a reconnisaince when they encountered a terrorist group which they followed into Angola. The group entered a small village and after our soldiers flattened everything that moved with gunfire somebody had to go in to check that all was well. Being the person that he was, Wayne never expected anybody to do something, if he could do it himself. He always had to prove himself. He and CPL David Prins went in and were both killed with an RPG.

Even if he is not a hero to the rest of this country, he will always be to me. He paid the highest price, he gave his life and I will always remember.

Carol Muller
redant@telkomsa.net
2009-01-28 08:13:21
1014I did basics with Lourens Muller at 5 SAI Ladysmith in July 1976. I did not really know him well but he seemed like a very enthusiastic NSM. He went on to Infantry School then became a corporal instructor at 4 SAI. He was killed by friendly fire in ambush gone wrong somewhere in Ovamboland (there was a court case against the troep involved but nothing was proven). RIP Lourens! Alan Stevenson
alanostevenson@yahoo.com.au
2013-01-01 20:10:46
1014

29 Sep 1977: Four members from 4 SAI were killed in a friendly fire incident at Okalongo when a soldier who was watching the rear of the ambush position suddenly turned around and opened fire on his fellow soldiers. The soldier in question subsequently appeared in the Windhoek Supreme Court on a charge of murder but was medically diagnosed as having acute schizophrenia and subsequently declared medically unfit to stand trial.

The casualties in this unfortunate incident were:

  • 69206464PE Sergeant Jan Pieter Albertus Furstenburg. He was 24
  • 74413659BB Corporal Leslie Muller. He was 19.
  • 74281734BG Rifleman Jan Joachim Jacobus de Vos. He was 18
  • 74382862BG Rifleman Cornelius Johannes Lourens. He was 19
Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-30 11:37:55
1021I was best friends with Isak. We both trained at 6SAI in Grahmstown. We both did drivers courses . I remember to often slipping out of camp with Isak to go to town on the odd occassion. Isak died on my birthday the 26 of january 1977. We were on a patrol down South of the Eenhana camp and we were all driving Mogs. The police Hippo went over two Russian tm 46 Mines and i was over at number two vehicle . Isak was in the fourth vehicle , or third , nevertheless he hit the mine. It was catastrophe. You wont understand this if you never been in a vehicle which has been in combat of this nature. he lost his legs , actually he died as a result of a botched casavac, helicopter pilot got lost , His liver burst and he bled to death. I had bought 2 cases of Sportsman larger ...ready for a hell of a party. gave it all away. isak was dead we were in no mood to party. All I add is this , As a successful businessman and now almost 60 , Isak was never given a chance. The way this all ended , used by a system and leaders who were cowards and who like PW Botha was nothing more that a Robey Leibrandt , Trying to save his VOLK and we paid the price. My dear friend and comrade Isak I will never ever forget you. I have recently been back to 6 SAI and was stunned at whats left. All in vain.....Rest in peace comrade , you were innocent to the core. To a system that failed .......your day will come.G Kruger
glenk@polka.co.za
2016-09-26 06:24:42
1021I was best friends with Isak. We both trained at 6SAI in Grahmstown. We both did drivers courses . I remember to often slipping out of camp with Isak to go to town on the odd occassion. Isak died on my birthday the 26 of january 1977. We were on a patrol down South of the Eenhana camp and we were all driving Mogs. The police Hippo went over two Russian tm 46 Mines and i was over at number two vehicle . Isak was in the fourth vehicle , or third , nevertheless he hit the mine. It was catastrophe. You wont understand this if you never been in a vehicle which has been in combat of this nature. he lost his legs , actually he died as a result of a botched casavac, helicopter pilot got lost , His liver burst and he bled to death. I had bought 2 cases of Sportsman larger ...ready for a hell of a party. gave it all away. isak was dead we were in no mood to party. All I add is this , As a successful businessman and now almost 60 , Isak was never given a chance. The way this all ended , used by a system and leaders who were cowards and who like PW Botha was nothing more that a Robey Leibrandt , Trying to save his VOLK and we paid the price. My dear friend and comrade Isak I will never ever forget you. I have recently been back to 6 SAI and was stunned at whats left. All in vain.....Rest in peace comrade , you were innocent to the core. To a system that failed .......your day will come.G Kruger
glenk@polka.co.za
2016-09-26 06:24:49
1028

25 Sep 1987: 85332369BG Private Adriaan Jacobus Naude from 1 Maintenance Unit was accidentally electrocuted at Modder River Station, South of Kimberley. He was 18.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-25 07:41:38
1035Shortly after the battles surrounding Bridge 14 in Angola, during Operation Savannah, and before the South Africans resumed their advance, on 17 December 1975 Gunner B.H. Neethling accidentally discharged one of his battery's 75 mm cannons. He was struck by the recoiling cannon and killed, whilst the shell fired struck a nearby ammunition truck, destroying it, but fortunately without any further loss of life. Information obtained from Avontuur in Angola by Sophia du Preez(J.L. van Schaik 1989) Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2009-11-08 08:06:55
1037

Rfn Nel was a member of 4 SAI Bn, attached to 53 Bn (Alpha Coy). He was stationed at Etale, 18 km from the Angolan border.

In early 1982, Nel was assigned to an escort detail that was to protect a Water Works JCB that had the task of repairing the water pipeline between Charlie Tower at Engela hospital and Eenhana. On the way there the JCB got stuck in the mud on several occasions. Nel and his buddy (Reyneke), got off the armoured vehicle and stayed close to the JCB with the intention of assisting it through the mud whenever it got close to getting stuck. From this point on, the going was really good, until the JCB detonated a land mine with one of it's back wheels.

Nel was killed instantly.

Unknown

2002-02-13 00:48:27
1040I would like to supply more info about Rfn.J.F.L Nel, which I found on the War Graves Project website.
Name: Johannes,Frederick,Lombaard
Surname: Nel
Rank: Rfn
Army no: 87469698BG
Unit: 8SAI & 61 Mech
Born: 22 March 1971
Died: 6 June 1991
Ryno Van Zyl-Kotze
rynok@iburst.co.za
2010-11-23 12:56:36
1042

I did my basic training with Johan Nel, at Valhalla Air Force Station, first intake 1988, 3rd Flight, Squadron 3, under Cpl Dave Doubell, Johan originally from a farm near Bredaarsdorp, was the ultimate gentle giant.

After basic tarining he was posted out to Mobile radar at the then snake valley, if I remember correctly, and he left for the border about the same time I did, July 1988, I never did see him there although we had regular contact over the radio's as we were in similar set-ups in mobile radar encampments he was just about three hundred kilo east of us.

I think it happened just before Christmas that year, Johan was on call and they got a heads-up and rushed to the trailers, only problem was that the one trailer was not earthed properly and in the rush Johan was barefooted and to further compound a rash of sad events, it had been raining, there was a short on the door of the trailer and as he touched it he was instantly shocked to death.

A waste of a truely great person, as it always is, but I think still an unforgivable mistake, one that has never been fully explained or cleared up. No one was brought to book for this nor a investigation launched. That's the story.

Johann was buried at his home town just after new years, if I remember correctly.

Lest we forget, you will always be missed you big dutchman!!

A friend.
Unknown
Unknown
2004-01-06 08:52:46
1046

I was in the C-160Z Crew that was flying reinforcements of 32 Bn soldiers during Ops Super. As I recall, 2LT Nel was a fair-haired shortish chap, but a real leader...a spitfire actually. I'd seen him on a number of other missions previously. We brought in successive loads over that period, and 2LT Nel was on one of the first loads. I remember him driving his men hard to get unloaded -to get out to the contact to support the Battalion. The next day we brought out his body and the other soldier killed with him. In all the roar of engines, sand, dust, diesel drums, ammunition, and frenzy, I recall wondering about the agony his parents were going to experience. In spite of all the tragedy, their unit put mission first. The soldiers who brought the remains to the aircraft did it with decorum -even though they were rushing to get on the Pumas to support the fight.

Kim Rolstone

Kim Rolstone

2001-05-30 13:37:59
1046

SWAPO HAD SET UP A NEW INFILTRATION ROUTE INTO THE KAOKOVELD TOWARDS THE END OF 1981 AND WHEN THE SOUTH AFRICAN ARMY LEARNT OF THIS IT WAS DECIDED TO ASAULT THE TRANSIT CAMP BASED AT CAMBENO 40 KILOMETERS NORTH OF THE CUNENE RIVER. PUMA HELICOPTERS AIRLIFTED THE ASSAULT FORCE, BUT AS THE CHOPPERS LIFTED OFF NELLA, AS LIEUTENANT NEL WAS KNOWN, FOUND THAT THE ENEMY WAS ONLY 50 METRES AWAY FROM THE LZ.

FORTUNATELY FOR HIM THE HELICOPTER GUNSHIPS MANAGED TO NEUTRALISE SOME OF THE ENEMY AND GAVE HIM A CHANCE TO CONSOLIDATE HIS POSITION. AN INTENSE FIRE FIGHT DEVELOPED AND LIEUTENANT NEL'S POSITION WAS BEING ASAULTED ON BOTH FLANKS SIMULTANEOUSLY. HE THEN CALLED FOR AIR SUPPORT BUT AS THIS WAS NOT AVAILABLE HE AND TWO MEN CHARGED THE ENEMY TO TRY AND ELIMINATE THE THREAT TO HIS TROOPS.

DURING THIS SELFLESS ACT HE WAS KILLED.

Unknown
Unknown
2001-11-17 19:00:42
1046In an attack on a large SWAPO base in the Cambena Valley, 32 Battalion troops were dropped into the area by helicopters but found themselves to be almost on top of the enemy, who were well entrenched in terrain that was etched with hollows, outcrops and cliffs. This made support by the helicopter gunships difficult, and the 32 Battalion group led by 2nd Lieutenant P.J.S. 'Nella' Nel stopper group made first contact with a group of between 50 and 100 SWAPO metres from the landing zone, and although they fought their way along the ravine for the next three hours, they were then attacked from both right and left flanks and were soon pinned down. Nel, realising that they could not remain in this precarious position led two of his men in a charge against the 12 enemy on his right flank, but was shot and killed during this charge. His body was retrieved at great risk by Sergeant Victor Dracula, Nel's second in command, and Rifleman Bernardo Domingos.   

Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-08 12:11:11
1046I was the chopper pilot providing topcover on that mission and uplifted Nellas body from the contact area.If anyone wants a detailed account of the battle and the circumstances,you can contact me on my email.lt.col. Charlie Bent
clasgolf@msn.com
2011-07-05 23:43:21
1050Hy is oorlede toe n vragmotor gerol het gedurende opleiding. Afkomstig van Malmesbury. Floris Coetzee
floris.coetzee@bme.co.za
2015-07-01 08:45:28
1057I was with Newton-Thompson in HQ Company in Oudtshoorn from 04 January 1965. We were in the Vickers ,.303 Medium Machine Gun Platoon and we went on a cross country run as we called it. It was a very hot day and my friend collapsed and die a day or two later . I later met his sister and we worked together for a while in 1994.Pieter Schoeman
schoemanp@elections.org.za
2008-08-20 15:26:57
1061Crashed following mid-air collision with Piper Pa-31 Navajo ZS-KTX over Swartkops. She was the Airhostess on the VIP flight. Her Pilots that died with her.. Capt J.I.T de Villiers and Leon Goldstein.

2003-09-30 20:14:02
1065

Vince was killed late afternoon, on 14 February - Valentines day - 1988. He was in a Ratel 20, when it was hit by a ZSU 23. He, Cpl Kleynhans and the two Groenewalds were all killed.

We will remember you



2003-11-09 21:49:58
1065

Rfl VV Nieuwenhuizen, AS Groenewald, PH Groenewald and Lance Corporal Kleynhans were killed at about 17h00 on 14 February 1988. Their Ratel got stuck on a treestump that was left in the tanktrack in front of us. When their Ratel got stuck, Corporal Kleinhans got on our Ratel 22A and rode with me until we got to the shona before the attack. 22C then caught up and the corporal left for his ratel.

About half an hour later we heard that 22C was shot out. It was shot on the lefthand by a ZSU23-4, but on the righthand where the Groenewalds sat, a big hole was ripped ou of the ratel. There were two more Groenewalds in the Ratel, the driver and another rifleman. The other rifleman was also seriously wounded in his neck from the shots. The two that were killed were the MAG gunner team. They were very dear friends, we started army together in Alpha Company 1SAI and in 2nd phase went to Bravo Company and then to Bravo at 61 Mech.

That day made that Valentines day will never be the same. One always thinks back to the friends who died that day, the sunset as we drove back, with smoke dwindling upwardsand bombs still exploding.

Hannes Lombaard
alpha@internext.co.za
2007-12-04 13:49:25
1069Killed in action, in a contact with the enemy near Evale (Operation Radbraak).
Sources:
1 "Die Buffel Struikel" by LJ Bothma
2 SA Wargraves.

Member of 32 Battalion
F Botha
frans@
2013-02-18 04:41:10
1069Killed in action, in a contact with the enemy near Evale (Operation Radbraak).
Sources:
1 "Die Buffel Struikel" by LJ Bothma
2 SA Wargraves.

Member of 32 Battalion
F Botha
frans@
2013-02-18 04:47:56
1075

Gideon Obbes died on the 24 November 1975 during a contact with MPLA forces at a bridge 40 kms North-East of Novo Redondo in Angola.

Unit was D Squadron attached to 2 SAI BN GP

Sam van den Berg (svdb3@iafrica.com)

Sam van den Berg
svdb3@iafrica.com
2001-05-30 13:37:59
1075

On 24 November 1975 two Eland armoured cars and a Unimog full of paratroopers approached a half-destroyed bridge 40 kilometres north-east of Redondo. The second armoured car came under fire when 150 metres from the bridge and was hit, mortally wounding the commander and bringing the Eland to a halt. Tpr Obbes abandoned the Eland and took cover in some nearby bushes but attempted to return to the Eland soon afterwards, where the other two surviving members of the crew were continuing to engage the enemy. Whilst he was climbing back onto the Eland, an enemy mortar bomb exploded close by, killing him instantly. Information extracted from "Cross of Honour" by Ian Uys. Uys Publishing 1992.

Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2008-01-25 04:49:58
1076

I only found out about what happened in 1993 when I went to visit some of the guys that joined on for short Service in 1992. Cpl Mike Land told me that L/Cpl Kladis had died in a car accident along with Pte Pohl and Pte Olberholzer. Mike Land and myself were their Medical Phase instructors.

Walter Panto
walter@zotos.co.za
2010-01-27 22:05:24
1078

He was my youngest brother and his full names were DIRK CORNELIUS ODENDAAL. He was born on the 11 January 1961 and at the time of his death we were residing at Phillip Botha street 4 Sasolburg. He is buried in the Sasolburg Cemetry.

He did his basics at 4 SAI (Middelburg) and then did a dog handlers course.Reason for death given was and A.D. (accidental discharge) of fellow soldiers firearm. He was attached to 16 Maint Unit at time of death

Mike Odendaal
odemike@yahoo.com
2011-01-10 15:35:32
1079The son of Brigadier H.O.M Odendaal DFC and bar, after whom he was named. Meyer was killed during a solo flight while undergoing flight training. His Impala crashed into the Kouebokke mountains in the Cape province of South Africa.

2002-08-04 19:28:12
1079

21 Sep 1971: 66211863E Candidate Officer Hendrik Oswald Meyer Odendaal from Flying Training School Langebaanweg was killed when his Atlas MB326M Impala Mk I, Serial No. 504, crashed in the Kouebokke Mountains near Citrusdal while carrying out a solo night Navigation exercise. Spatial disorientation (Vertigo) was the suspected cause of the accident. He was 20.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-21 12:47:27
1085

Towards the end of 1987 two platoons of D Company (Jan 1986 ? Dec 1987), 1 Parachute Battalion were seconded to 5 Reconnaissance Regiment. The platoons were under command of Capt PA Pienaar (Pine), 2IC of D Coy and the platoon commanders were Lt J de V Kruys and 2Lt F J Wiese.

Together with members of 5 and 2 Reconnaissance Regiments, the members of D Coy took part in an attack on a Swapo base in central Angola. The operation was named Ops Firewood.

The attack commenced at dawn on 31 October 1987 and the SA forces only withdrew after dark on the same day. It was estimated that more than 300 Swapo fighters were killed during the battle.

At the end of the day Cpl N S Olivier, L/Cpl R M Light, Rfn H N de Rose, Rfn D W van Rooyen and Rfn W F Ewels were dead, killed in action. Several other members of D Coy was also wounded during the battle and Rfn J m Schuurman died on 1 November 1987 of his wounds.

Capt P A Pienaar the 2IC of D Coy who was in charge of the two platoons was killed in West Africa almost 10 years later, on 29 October 1997.

The names of these members of D Coy appear on the Wall of Remembrance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein.

We remember our comrades who paid the highest price on that day in 1987. They were all heroes and proud paratroopers.

Ex Alto Vincimus - We Conquer from Above



2003-08-28 14:14:18
1088

Died in a Military Vehicle Accident, involving his section being transported in a Gladiator. There was a bad crash and fire, with the troops trapped in the rear. The army vehicle he was in collided head-on with a newspaper delivery van between Colesberg and Philippolis, on their way back to Ladysmith army camp.

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2009-07-09 20:18:23
1088

13 Sep 1970: Six members from 5 SAI and one member from 3 SAI were killed while being transported in a Gladiator Troop Carrier back to Ladysmith Army Camp. Their vehicle was involved in a head-on collision with a Newspaper Delivery Van between Colesburg and Philippolis and the vehicle immediately burst into flames with the men still trapped inside.

The casualties were:

241
66458696N Rifleman Hilton Dudley Coker (3 SAI). He was 19.
528
65395287N Rifleman John Grinyer (5 SAI). He was 20.
808
6732700N Rifleman Peter Alfons Ernst Leonhardt (5 SAI). He was 19.
853
68238567N Rifleman Kevin Eric Mack (5 SAI). He was 18.
903
68444918N Rifleman Richard Neville Marriott (5 SAI). He was 17.
1088
68222322N Rifleman Gregory George Olyott (5 SAI). He was 18.
1448
68307446N Rifleman Mark Felice Vallero (5 SAI). He was 18.
John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2014-09-13 10:24:11
1090

Danie Oosthuizen was a number 3 on a 127 mm rocket launcher. He trained as we all did in Potch at 14 Field Regt as a gunner and when we made the transition to the launchers he continued as a no 3.

We were on our way to the border to take part in Operation Askari, and were travelling in convoy from our base in Middelburg where our battery had been moved to form part of the battle group based in 4 SAI. We were to join 62 Mech in Omutiya.

We had all been issued with live ammo prior to leaving Middelburg and were driving through Namibia somewhere past Otjiwarongo. Rudi Simpelaar who was Danie's no 1 on the launcher was driving the Unimog (they were left hand drive vehicles) and Danie was in the passenger seat. Rudi had his R4 resting on the rear view mirror bracket and was taking the odd shot at game along the road. A shot went off, he lost control of the unimog and rolled it. Danie had his arm resting out of the open window when the mog rolled. He was badly injured in the accident, I remember seeing his injuries and seeing him leave in the transport to the hospital in Otjiwarongo. He died that night (I think, or maybe the next) and I still have a photograph of the unimog after the accident.

He was in my troop, I was battery survey sergeant and he was a fine young man. His brother was in the same battery and I remember Johan being told of the loss of his brother, I still think of him when I drag out my old army photos.

Anton Welz
antlyn@worldonline.co.za
2006-04-17 16:34:07
1090Danie Oosthuizen and I trained together as number three gunners. We operated the sights on cannons and rocket lauchers. He was driving his MRL in front of me, in convoy, when it rolled. The rear wheel hit the culvert and it shot up into the air. I remember the shock and horror of seeing the Unimog flying through the air. Then the dust and debris blocking ones view. I stopped the on coming traffic and ran into the dust to find the two occupants. Danie was lying about 50 meters from the MRL. His arm was chopped off and he was full of deep cuts. The roof of the Unimog tore and was sharp as blades. We also found Rudi Simpelaar. His calf was cut to the bone. His was full of bruises and scrapes. Our medic Mark Webster arrived and did his utmost to save Danie. Mark was a professional medic with five years of experience with Cape Metro. We loaded the injured on tables to transport them, held the drips, picked up the mess. Danie died that night. I think he was not eighteen yet. Deon Luyt
dgluyt@gmail.com
2014-10-01 01:27:39
1092Het blykbaar gesterf in skietongeluk buite oshakati.Niemand weet regtig wat gebeur het nie.

2003-11-21 22:26:31
1092Frikkie was my nephew. I can still remember his funeral like it was yesterday. My aunt received a letter from him a week after he was buried telling her he can't wait to come home.She had a nervous breakdown then and did not really recover from that but now they are together. He was laid to rest in Meyerton cemetery.

2008-09-24 21:20:36
1092Buried in Kookrus near Meyerton.
Grave has no gravestone.
Grave number: 342
Gareth
wantmore000@hotmail.com
2011-01-10 17:41:21
1093

This is an update of the data for H.A. Oosthuizen:

Surname
Oosthuizen
Initials
H.A.
Full names
Herman Adolf
Date of birth
07-12-1961
Corps
Army
Date of death
24-09-1987
Death Age
25 years
Place of death
Bagani, Caprivi
Military number
86202983BG
Cause
Killed in motor vehicle accident during anti-insurgent operations in Southern Angola.
Cemetery
Ladysmith, Kwazulu-Natal
Unit
Special Forces, Fort Doppies
Chris Venter
chrisv69@gmail.com
2010-09-20 09:41:20
1093

Dedication:

Dear Brother in Law, with the approach of the anniversary of your death on 24 September 1987 we want to let you know that we will never forget you. We salute you for the unselfish work done for the Bushmen children in the Caprivi. You could still have been with us if it was not for the senseless war to satisfy the egos of polititians.

Chris Venter
chrisv69@gmail.com
2010-09-21 09:52:58
1093

25 Sep 1987: 86202983BG Lance Corporal Herman Adolf Oosthuizen from Special Forces, attached to Fort Doppies was killed in a military vehicle accident while engaged in anti-insurgent operations in South Eastern Angola. He was 26.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-25 07:42:32
1094I am assuming this is the same Oosthuizen mentioned in the book, Baanbreek In Die Bos written and published recently by Annie Buitendag, who is the wife of then Cmdt Thys Buitendag, 203 Battalion's commanding officer at the time. If so, then this is Pte Oosthuizen's story according to Mrs Buitendag, who was living at Mangetti-Duin, 203 Battalion's main base, in 1983. 

"(freely translated into English by me) Talking about the team in the kitchen: one of the chefs, little Oosthuizen,  wanted very much to go along on one of the 'ops', to experience the war for himself. The Companies relieved one another about every six weeks, and eventually he had an opportunity to go along on an 'ops'......Tragic as it was, the Buffel in which and a few others were riding hit a landmine, and he was the only one killed."   Extracted from Baanbreek In Die Bos by Annie Buitendag, Biblaridion BK, 2010
Peter Chapman
chappiep@hotmail.com
2011-12-02 01:18:13
1095

The above was my SGT during my National Service 1983-84. He was killed in Action in early December during Operation Askari. He was part of the Anti-Aircraft team that was dropped off near Caindo in Southern Angola. During a massive contact involving over 200 Fapla troops he was killed. I was not with him but buddies of mine who were there told me of his heroism when he stayed behind manning a LMG so the rest could get away. Besides him the LT and 5 others were also killed.

Maarten

2001-08-28 12:55:47
1095I would like to get in contact of any of my old friends who was from 1SSB and we were stationed in Oshakati Sector 10 from 1983-84Barnes
gary@chipstix.org
2007-04-14 00:13:04
1097

2Lt Andre Opperman was killed in a SWAPO ambush on 6 September 1978 close to Chana Omalapapa at Beacon 28 on the Angolan border.

Information obtained from Louis Bothma's book, Die Buffel Struikel.
Dion Rossouw
grossouw@wdsl.co.za
2007-01-24 21:17:36
1097

I remember Oppies as I worked with him and picked up his body after he was killed on the white road. Oppies was killed on the border. I also remember Sarel Kruger and Gerhard Retief was was with us and also both dead

Martin Venter
mpventer@iafrica.com
2008-01-18 16:29:20
10972Lt Opperman was in command of the Second Platoon, Bravo Company, 32 Battalion, who were on patrol on 12 September. They walked into a 39 strong SWAPO ambush just 200 metres from the SWA / Angola border, at Chana Omelepapa, SWAPO allowing almost half of the patrol to enter the kill zone before opening fire with both small arms and a PKM machine gun. 2Lt Opperman was killed just eight metres from the position of the latter, whilst two more of his men were wounded before SWAPO withdrew into Angola.

Information extracted from "32 Battalion - The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit" by Piet Nortje
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-01 02:26:56
1102

Lt Nigel Osborne was shot down on 6 September 1979 in Mozambique whilst co-piloting a Puma seconded to the Rhodesian Air Force. The pilot, Lt Paul Velleman and flight-engineer Sgt D Retief were also killed. I believe they were carrying ammunition and got hit by a RPG7.

Unknown
dovey.john@gmail.com
2003-05-31 11:29:40
1102

Nigel (My Cousin) was flying a Puma with 13 other occupants im Mozimbique during Operation Uric To quote http://home.wanadoo.nl/rhodesia/uric1.htm

En route one Huey was forced to put down in a pan due to severe engine vibrations. The remainder, continuing on to Mapai, suddenly overflew a big enemy camp spread over a large area, and one of the Pumas, Hotel Four, was hit by an RPG-7 as it headed for its dropping zone. The result was the worst single disaster of the Rhodesian war. The rocket struck the aircraft behind the pilot’s seat and exploded, killing all 14 people aboard. Forced into a downward spin the helicopter hit the ground and burst into flames. Army call signs dispatched to the crash site found the aircraft totally destroyed, the largest pieces being the turbines; they also found the 14 bodies of their comrades and arranged for their recovery when safe to do so after the taking of Mapai. Sadly this proved impossible.

Recently a Journalist contacted his mother saying he had found the site where Nigel and the 13 other people were buried.

Chris Morley
crdmorley@gmail.com
2009-11-10 13:46:39
1102

Search for Puma Lost at Mapai

April 11, 2009 - April 14, 2009

Under the cover of darkness, on the night of the 6th September 1979, I was flown out of the forward admin area of Op Uric, situated deep in the Mozambique bush, to our Operational Forward HQ situated at Chipinda Pools. I was the sole passenger in the SAAF Puma that evening, and my task was to sort out notices for the casualties sustained earlier that day, when a SAAF Puma (See Photo 1) carrying elements of 1 Commando 1RLI and 2 Engineer Squadron had been shot down on the outskirts of Mapai (Rail) formerly known as Jorge de Limpopo, killing all 17 on board. During the 40 odd minute flight back to the Rhodesian border, I vowed that I would one day return to the crash site to honour my friends and comrades in arms who had made the supreme sacrifice that morning, but who, because of the expediency of the battle, had had to be left behind where they had died.

29 years later I was privileged enough to be invited to join Bob Manser's expedition to find the Donaldson Canberra lost over the Malvernia area in January 1977. It became plainly obvious during this search, that the local police, militia, and Mozambicans were more than willing to assist in the location of these war sites and bore absolutely no malice towards their former adversaries. It was then that I realised that it was possible to honour the pledge I had made in 1979. Slowly over a period of 5 months I was able to assemble a "Team" for the Mapai expedition by using the members of Bob's Canberra party as the nucleus.

Regrettably both Bob and Alistair Macrimmon were both unable to make it and so Neill Jackson ex Support Commando, "Stan" Standish White ex SAS volunteered their services. Added to these "volunteers" were Eastern District farmers Duff Odendaal and his son in law, Gareth Barry. The final search team was thus made up as follows:

  • Rick van Malsen
  • Kevin Jones
  • Malcolm Macrimmon
  • Neill Jackson
  • "Stan" Standish White
  • Duff Odendaal
  • Gareth Barry

Nearly two hundred E mails were sent out globally as we planned, sourced information, obtained eye witness accounts, speculated on where the actual site was, made up introductory letters and catch phrases in Portuguese, sorted out admin and log etc. It finally all came together and on Thursday 11th April 2009 "The Team", complete with wives, converged on Mabalahuta camp in the southern Gonarezhou National Park.

Friday 12th April was used as a rest day and was used to prepare ourselves for the trip to the search area. Later in the afternoon we held a final formal briefing of what to expect, where we were going etc.

Saturday 13th April 2009 we rose early and in two vehicles, left camp at 0500 hours so that we could be at the border at 0600 hours, the supposed opening time. True to form, the bleary-eyed border officials only arrived at 0645, which meant we only got through the border formalities at 0800 hours, 1 hour behind our planned timings. The road down to Mapai remains mostly unchanged over the last 30 years. Trains derailed by various SF operations that many years ago, were still in evidence, as well as many shot out buildings. We all just hoped that Stan's contribution to the road had been removed, as he couldn?t remember where he had buried them.

At 1030 hours we arrived in Mapai (Rail) and asked directions the police station. This was a broken down 2 room building that could have passed for a toilet. Not an auspicious start! A young policeman read our letter of introduction and said that we needed to see the local military or garrison Commandant. He then went off to find him but returned to say he was not there. We were then taken to the head of FRELIMO party for the area. Arlindo Penicela Baloi, who, although unable to speak English, was able to read our letter of introduction. Thank heavens for Bob's notes! He reiterated that we had to go back and get the Garrison Commandant's permission.

Back down the road again and fortunately the Commandant was now at home and after reading our letter cheerfully gave permission for us to go to the crash site, but insisted we had to get the local headman?s blessing first. Protocol reined supreme! Now accompanied by Arlindo we set off to site. Suddenly Arlindo stopped me and spoke to a portly gentleman on the side of the road who turned out was able to speak English. Wallah a translator! Solomone, the translator, climbed in and off we went.

We followed a track leading directly East from the main road for about 3 kms when we stopped at a small village where, seated under a tree, was the local headman Araujo Chivite. After a brief discussion between my other two passengers and Araujo, he readily agreed to show us where the site was. With Araujo's 2ic also in tow, (now making 5 of us in a king cab!) we then continued down the track which gradually turned South where we intersected the main Mapai/Machaila road about 3.7 kms from Mapai (Rail)

We had only gone a few metres down the road when we were told to stop and on getting out of the vehicle, we were shown an area which we were told was the crash site. An initial search turned up a partially burnt SF water bottle and then we started finding the unmistakable signs of an aircraft crash. There was a large mound in the centre of the site and this, we were told, was where the soldiers killed in the crash were buried.

We had brought a prefabricated cross complete with a base with us and asked permission to erect this on the site. Araujo immediately agreed but only on condition the site was cleaned up first, which they insisted on doing themselves! These were recovered and brought back with us. Once the cross had been erected, a brief service was held, using the exact format as Bob had used at the other sites, and the Roll of Honour read out. This is repeated below for those who have not seen it.

  • "With thanksgiving, let us remember those who sacrificed their lives so that we may live on in peace, and in appreciation, we now dedicate this cross to their memories. Help us to keep them in our thoughts, and never forget what they gave for us."
  • CAPT JOHANNES MATHEUS DU PLOOY 1 RLI
  • CAPT CHARLES DAVID SMALL ENG 2ND
  • LT BRUCE FRASER BURNS ENG
  • SGT MICHAEL ALAN JONES ENG
  • CPL LEROY DUBERLEY ENG
  • CPL GORDON HUGH FRY 1 RLI
  • L/CPL PETER FOX ENG
  • TPR JACOBUS ALWYN BRIEL 1 RLI
  • TPR AIDEN JAMES COLEMAN 1 RLI
  • TPR MARK JEREMY CROW 1 RLI
  • TPR BRIAN LOUIS ENSLIN 1 RLI
  • TPR STEVEN ERIC KING 1 RLI
  • TPR COLIN GRAHAM NEASHAM 1 RLI
  • TPR DAVID REX PROSSER 1 RLI
  • CAPT PAUL VELLERMAN SAAF
  • LT NIGEL OSBORNE SAAF
  • F/SGT DICK RETIEF SAAF

"They shall not grow old As we that are left, grow old Age shall not weary them, nor do the years condemn, At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them"

Neill then repeated the words of the service in Afrikaans in memory of the South African crew. Finally the "Last Post" was played. At all stages of the service the Mozambique contingent were actively involved which we all found very humbling and magnanimous. At the end of the proceedings headman Araujo called a woman called Lydia, who was farming the surrounding fields, and instructed her to build a fence around the site so that the war graves can be looked after properly in the future.

After leaving an appropriate reward with the headman for this to be done, we packed up and left the site, each in our own thoughts. After dropping off Araujo at his village, we returned to Mapai (Rail) and then decided to go down to the old Mapai airfield and Mapai (River) both targets of the Scouts column raid in June 1977. Arlindo and Solomone both accompanied us on this leg, which rather inhibited us from scouting around too much for old military positions.

At Mapai (River) we were shown a mass grave, covered by a concrete slab, which we were told held the civilian victims of this raid. Expedition members showed the appropriate respect at this site. We then returned to Mapai (Rail), dropped off our two passengers and headed off back towards the border.

Our next task was to return to the site of the Donaldson Canberra crash site in order to place a more permanent memorial to the airmen lost in this crash. Time was running short, so we dispensed with protocol and just drove direct to the site. After placing the cross, we sounded the "Last Post" which was particularly fitting as the sun was starting to set as the sound of bugles rang out hauntingly through the silent bush. We then had to rush for the border before it closed, which we got through without any problems and headed for home, arriving at 20 00 hours.

We had travelled a total of 360 kms in 15 hours. There are many people involved in making a trip, such as this, the success it was.

My grateful thanks go to the following:

  • First and foremost to Bob Manser, who pioneered searching for these forgotten sites. Bob gave us all his notes to use, offered invaluable advice and encouragement throughout
  • Prop Geldenhuys for all the help, encouragement and research done on our behalf.
  • Eyewitness accounts from Gavin Wehlburg, Jono Lane and Keith Dell all helped to get an overall picture of approximately where we had to look.
  • To the ex Rhodesians of Francistown, who fabricated the crosses, galvanised them and then painted them all at no cost. They looked magnificent.
  • To the 5 wonderful Mozambicans who took the time out to guide us and asked for nothing in return. You were a wonderful example of what true reconciliation should be. There is absolutely no doubt that this war memorial will be looked after by these people.
  • And lastly to the most wonderful "team" without whom, none of this would have happened. All rallied to the call, and freely gave up their valuable time and at personal cost, to be there.

"Thank you" is not enough.

RICK VAN MALSEN
FRANCISTOWN
Leon
leonbez@lantic.net
2009-11-20 19:34:15
1106

26 Sep 1990: 85083319BW Corporal Freek Johannes Palmer from the Cape Regiment was critically wounded while on patrol in Kwamashu after being shot by an unknown gunman using a home-made weapon. He succumbed to his wounds in Addington Hospital later in the day. He was 26.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-27 04:26:01
1107

"Bones" Palmer as he was known was a member of the Natal Carbineers during SWA border duty

Unknown
Unknown
2003-03-12 14:52:29
1107

Palmer died of injuries received when a rifle grenade exploded prematurely.

Unknown
Unknown
2003-06-19 21:51:12
1107

As far as I know, R.C. Palmer "Bones", was a member of The Natal Carbineers, B Company, at the time of his death.

Walter D. Borain
dougborain@gmail.com
2008-08-02 19:00:14
1114Buffel Accident somewhere, he was based in 8SAI

2001-05-30 13:37:59
1115(with limited info available, i'm not sure if this is the person i'm referring to) He (Patterson) served with me in 1SSB in 1989. We did a couple of months in Lohatla, in preparation for deployment in SWA. Good times - we were young and life was simple. We spent the weeks in the bush (sleeping next to our cars, in the open), with weekends in the camp. He was the driver of our "noddy" (Eland 90) - which was not an easy task!!, as the compartment/cockpit was very small (he was a tall guy), no power steering and an upside-down gear lever arrangement... We once stole 2 goats to braai in the veld. We threw the two goats down the hatch, into the drivers little cockpitt..(patterson had a big skrik), used some tentpoles for a spit, and had a good (very tough meat) meal, washed down with some warm lion largers..! One terrible morning, Patterson (i can't remember his 1st name) was caught between a heavy trailer and a samil, we were all with him and tried to help, but it was to late...He died of his wounds. I helped to pack his personal belongings, which was sent to his family. If anyone remembers this, or has more detail of Patterson's family - please post them. Regards Dawid Leonhardt
dawid.leonhardt@gmail.com
2010-01-26 08:29:26
111609 Sep 1976: 70201470BT Rifleman Christiaan Hendrik Pauley died from a gunshot wound accidentally sustained in a shooting incident. He was 17.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-09 00:33:15
1117

In November 1975 Battle Group Foxbat had routed an MPLA force, which retreated across Bridge 14 at the Nhia River and then blew it up. The advance of the South African forces along the only tarred road to Quibala was brought to a halt at the river - due to heavy rainfall in the area and swampy terrain, the bridge was the only means of crossing with heavy vehicles.

Colonel Swart, CO of Task Force Zulu, wanted to know what the enemy was doing at the bridge and so Cdt Breytenbach sent Sergeant Danny Roxo with a platoon of infantry and a couple of armoured cars to the bridge area to reconnoitre.

Shortly afterwards the main force heard the sound of battle, including mortar fire. In the distance the two armoured cars were observed returning to the main force at full speed, closely followed by exploding mortar shells. Breytenbach ordered the cars to return to assist Roxo and the infantry, but the commanders refused, saying the barrage was too heavy.

Then the infantry appeared on the road and a few minutes later Roxo and his men had climbed onto the armoured cars and returned to the main force's positions. Roxo reported that the bridge was down, and mentioned offhand that a few enemy soldiers had been killed during his reconnaissance.

Evidently, as Roxo had moved forward to check the bridge he saw a Cuban on the far side and shot him. Roxo began to move back and more enemy troops then emerged from cover and began shooting at him. He returned fire from the hip, killing eleven of the enemy, four of them Cubans. He was later awarded the Honoris Crux for this encounter.

Roxo's exceptional courage is evidenced by the manner of his death some months later. During a patrol near the Okavango river, his Wolf hit a landmine and was tipped over, killing one man and crushing Roxo beneath it. The rest of the crew tried to lift it free, but it was too heavy.

Danny Roxo, in keeping with his dauntless character, decided to make the best of things, lighting a cigarette and smoking it calmly until it was finished, then he died - still pinned beneath the Wolf. He had not complained once, nor uttered a single groan or moan, although the pain must have been excruciating.

Thus Sergeant Danny Roxo died, a man who had become a legend in the Portuguese Security Forces in Mozambique, and who had rapidly become another one in the South African Special Forces.



2001-11-17 19:26:01
1117

I met Daniel Roxo back in 1968/70 in the Niassa province of Mozambique. He was a good man and an outstanding soldier along with his men. I served the Portuguese army and made some field operations with Roxo. Still have a photo of both of us in the bush.

I'm sorry he's gone. I though it were rumors when in 1974/5 I heard the story from a Highaway Commando from Pinetown/Natal.

Let his soul rest in peace.



2002-11-10 21:56:59
1117

I read this with great interest as I was in the armoured cars in question at the recce incident towards the bridge, and in fact was in the Charlie car of the Pappa troop who was the first to cross Bridge 14 when the eventual attack started some days later.

I agree wholeheartedly that Danny was an amazing soldier, but I respectfully disagree with some facts around the particular contact as repeated through third hand accounts that were not at the actual scene of the contact.

In mitigation to the armoured car crews involved, allow me to explain what actually expired as experienced by us.

Some confusion and different perceptions apply here as recounted by various parties over time.

Firstly one has to understand the composition of the combat groups at the time. Principally the UNITA and FNLA forces in the southern part of Angola then consisted out of a nucleas core group of European SADF officers and senior NCOs? to lead the untrained and ill equipped UNITA/FNLA infantry rabble, and who also operated the jeep mounted 106 recoilless guns and 60/81mm mortars, along with two troops of 90mm Eland armoured cars. The artillery and other support assets only joined just before the battle of Ebo and later preceding Bridge 14. Up to that stage it was a very fluid and mobile war very much dictated by the military prowess of the local combat group commander. Up to that point one became used that especially the UNITA troops decamped at the first sign of serious opposition, leaving the SADF command element to face the music.

Secondly allow me to correct the statement that Foxbat had routed the MPLA forces that fled over the Bridge. In fact, itself was badly routed on the 23rd of November (and not on the 25th as stated on some official accounts) by the Cuban MMCA troops under Diaz Arguellas. These were the Cuban equivalent of Speznatz also under command of the Cuban Dept of Interior Affairs as was the Soviet model. The Cubans unknown to us at that stage had precious few troops in the field against us and through sheer audacity and genius on the side of Diaz, who one has to admire as a soldier, checkmated both the Bravo and Foxbat Combat groups first north of Novo Rodondo, and later at Ebo with limited military assets to his disposal. At that stage the forces where viewing each other over the Nhia river with some trepidation and it was only then that the Cuban forces were heavily reinforced with substantial troops and artillery, including BM21's and 120m mortar batteries and they even had some Sagger anti tank missiles which thankfully were never deployed against our armoured forces. Although they went under the flag of MPLA, it consisted principally out of the MMCA troops with some supporting MPLA troops very much like or own combat groups. It was surmised that Diaz died in the Bridge 14 battle, but we were very much ignorant of all that at that stage. But I am digressing, back to the particular tactical movement involving Danny Roxo on that eventful evening.

It was not the first time that we approached the bridge, as we approached the bridge area only a couple of days prior and were then subjected to heavy "red eye" missile fire. In fact the bridge over the Nhia river were blown by Diaz?s troops in the face of Foxbat?s initial advance, and the general advance axis focus shifted to the Bravo Combat Group under Cmdt. Breytenbach then at Novo Rodondo where they themselves were checked by Diaz?s troops at some bridge north of Novo Rodondo, and it was realized that the focus had to shift back to Foxbat who then tried the Ebo route and later the Bridge 14 route. (Just imagine the tactical opportunity to our forces if they realized that they were being checked on both advance routes by the same small enemy contingent?)

We were actually under the command of Cmdt. Kruis who just took over from Cmdt. Webb as commander of the Foxbat Combat Group. Cmdt. Breytenbach who commanded the Bravo Combat Group and who only joined us on the day of the battle of Ebo on the 23rd of Nov, apparently ordered a full troop to accompany the infantry soldiers to recce the blown bridge. We were surprised that we were called upon to do so not being in the Bravo Combat Group, and as we just returned from a day long mission and were busy servicing our cars. As only 2 cars was immediately available, our troop leader 2ndLT Grib ordered the Alpha and Charlie cars to accompany the troops, and might I add, with little briefing as to the mission or who the infantry were.

One has to remember that up to that time the SA troops grew used to the fact that the UNITA troops decamped at the first sign of trouble and had no faith in their military capability at all.

The troops that accompanied us were seemingly a bunch of ill disciplined UNITA troops and at no stage did we even know that Danny accompanied them.

It was already dusk when we moved forward, and the cars took up a herringbone position 30m in front of the blown bridge on a slightly raised narrow tar road. The river turned sharply to the right after the bridge roughly flowing SS-E, exposing any friendly forces to close enemy fire.

The UNITA troops scattered in a seemingly unmilitary deployment, and we were left pondering the sensibility of exposing the real offensive military assets available to Foxbat in our 19 year old minds. At no stage were we aware that Danny in fact crossed the river and were on the opposite bank in enemy territory.

Suddenly we came under heavy RPG 7 fire (not mortars as claimed) and as per normal the UNITA troops decamped at the first shot. (As a fast "tactical withdrawal" to put it mildly) That left us seriously exposed with no support against anti tank infantry attack. That as any military tactician would confirm, was a total untenable position. I clearly saw the launchers being fired from very close on our right from behind trees in the river line. We started laying down a covering fire with our co-ax Browning machine guns as we couldn?t use our main weapon as the 90mm shells would have detonated against the close trees. I have a photograph of one of our cars where a RPG glanced of the side leaving a nasty gash. By that stage there was no sign of any friendly infantry troops, and we had no reason to linger any longer than was absolute necessary, we turned the cars around on the tar road with great difficulty, as one would promptly become mired should one allow even a wheel to leave the tar road, and withdrew ourselves back to our base position, the whole time attracting RPG fire from very close proximity.

Back at our base position Cmdt. Breytenbach briefly spoke to the Alpha car crew commander and we were none the wiser on the subsequent proceedings. The gist of the full story only became apparent much later and in hind sight.

I have delivered many talks on various aspects of Ops Savannah over the years and as founding Chairman of CAPE SAAACA and SAHA (South African Historian Association) promote the establishment of the true history instead of sanitised politicised versions. It is imperative that the factual history be documented as it often is reflected in "adapted form" by opportunistic raconteurs and eventually becomes accepted as the truth.

Stephan Fourie
stephan@sfa.co.za
2008-05-06 20:12:14
1117A great portuguese and militar in Africa. I research all informations and photos about him. Admira??o profunda pela sua tenecidade e heroismo. Gostaria de poder contar com toda a informa??o que for poss?vel reunir sobre o Daniel Roxo. Merece uma publica??o factual da sua vida. Agrade?o pois todoas as achegas e informa??es que for poss?vel enviarem-me.C. Serra
casimiro.serra@hotmail.com
2009-02-13 21:15:32
1117

Francisco Daniel Roxo was born on the 1st of February 1933 in the village of Mogadouro in the Tras os Montes province of Portugal. In 1951 he settled in the Portuguese colony of Mozambique and after a short period with the Civil Service became involved with hunting in the Niassa province of Northern Mozambique. It was during these years that Daniel honed his skills and learnt the moods of the bush that were to be put to use in the war against insurgents in later years. Daniel was to lead the Militia Forces in the Niassa province with great success and for his actions in combat, was awarded 2 x CRUZ DE GUERRA ( Portuguese Cross of Honour) as well as the MEDALHA DE SERVICOS DESTINTOS ( Medal of Merit).

Daniel left Mozambique shortly after the Portuguese revolution of 25th April 1974, and joined the South African Defence Force. At the age of 41 was to pass the tough selection course to join 1 Reconnaissance as a Special Forces Operator. Soon after qualification he was seconded to Charlie Coy of Bravo Group as a platoon Leader. Soon after his arrival Operation Savannah starts, and Daniel’s actions in combat against Cuban and Angolan Forces at Bridge 14 Angola in December of 1975 had him recommended for and awarded the HONORIS CRUX Decoration. S Sgt Daniel Roxo was the first non - South African to receive this decoration! On the 23rd August 1976 Daniel was killed in combat during an ambush. Daniel was also awarded the PRO PATRIA MEDAL with the Cunene Clasp as well the Southern Africa Medal (posthumously).

Daniel left behind a wife and 6 children.

Manuel Ferreira
manuelferreira@eject.co.za
2009-05-13 21:03:10
1117

                                IT WHOSE A LIVING LEGEND AND A TRUE HERO FOR ALL OF US YOUNG MOZAMBIQUE BOYS.

 

OLD PORTUGAL HIGHLANDS BLOOD AND GUTS.

 

NEVER SURRENDER , LOYAL TO THE END.

 

REST IN PEACE

MOXO
joaomagar@hotmail.com
2012-07-22 13:59:10
1117

                                IT WHOSE A LIVING LEGEND AND A TRUE HERO FOR ALL OF US YOUNG MOZAMBIQUE BOYS.

 

OLD PORTUGAL HIGHLANDS BLOOD AND GUTS.

 

NEVER SURRENDER , LOYAL TO THE END.

 

REST IN PEACE

MOXO
joaomagar@hotmail.com
2012-07-22 13:59:20
1120

Killed in Action (Tank took out Ratel)

4th January 1984

Niel Wiid
niel@systemiclogic.net
2009-10-24 12:32:11
1120 He was actually shot and killed was not in the ratelFlip van Wyk
fvanwyk@lindsaysaker.co.za
2012-05-15 03:39:15
1122Ek was saam met Wynand op Hoerskool Wagpos en Uitkoms koshuis. Hy was ook my peleton Lt. in 84/85 op 7SAI.

Hy is oorlede 2 weke voor ons sou uitklaar. Ons het spore gekry van 'n groep van vier terroriste naby "Johannes se pad sektor 20" Al ons toerusting was op buffels. Ons het die spoor so 4 uur namiddag gekry en begin najaag. teen 6:30 was dit te donker. Die volgended oggend me sons opkoms het ons weer die spoor begin volg. Ek was in ondersteuning met 'n LMG. Na 30 minute het ek met Wynand geruil.

5 ~ 10minute later het die spoorsnyer 'n POM Z anti personneel myne afgetrap. Wynand was so 3 meter agter hom en is agv die skrapnel beseer. Hy is dieselfde aand oorlede.

Hy het 'n hond op die grens gehad "Ratpack" wat ons as 'n peleton aan sy ouers oorgegee het in Phalaborwa in Junie 85 toe ons uitklaar
Gerry Botha
gerrybotha@bigpond.com
2010-06-22 15:07:45
1122Ek het in junie 1984 ingeklaar te 7sai  te Delta Komp.my pel bev was 2lt Armstrong.Ek dink my peleton sersant was Kpl Oddendal.Ek is na die JL peleton wat na Infanterie Skool moes gaan . Ek onthou een middag nadat ons klas gehad het in die opleidings gebied te7 sai ,2lt Pearson ons peleton terug gehou het om ons n voorsmaak te gee van" Faffa" Skool ons is letterlik opgevok.Nadat ek my kursus deurloop het is ek terug 7Sai toe waar ek met skok uitgevind het dat 2lt pearson omgekom het agv die pomzet myn.Ek onthou nog toe sy vader sy Pro Patria medalje in ontvangs geneem het toe die res van die inhame uitklaar.Dana du Plessis
dana@tshwane.gov.za
2010-08-10 11:41:07
1122Wynand and I were in the same platoon in Oudtshoorn and returned to 7SAI in June 1984 on completion of JL's. He was a great shot and assisted me on the shooting range, aiding me in getting my silver balkie, which, without his assitance I would have had no chance of achieving. He went to the border with the other "ou Manne" company and I went to Odangwa in Dec 1984. We had returned to 7SAI about a week his company were due back, just before we were due to demob in June 1985, when we heard the news of his passing. It was said that he fought through several heart attacks in the casavac chopper following the Pom-Z blast, but that he had not been able to pull through. I will always remember him as an "opregte mens - 'n sout van die aarde" RIPCpt Graeme Armstrong SA Irish Regiment
garmstrong@komatsu.co.za
2011-09-27 07:56:14
1123

Steve was 54 Bn stationed at Eenhana. Attack after a Kuku shop visit and killed just before our end of time there. We called him Simon (Simple Simon) as he believed in keeping everything simple.

Was a good soldier and friend.

By Mark Cronje - Miami - USA
Mark Cronje
shipshapeusa@cs.com
2007-09-25 04:25:31
1123

I was with Steve on the border in Eenana and Eludu.I would like to correct the imformation.He was with me in Charlie company 5SAI. He was shot through the groin and the bleeding could not be stopped in time. RIP my young mate. You will never grow old like the rest of us.

Arnold Mazur
mazmen@optusnet.com.au
2010-02-11 10:17:07
1123Was also with Steve on this unfortunate day. We were riding donkeys at the beginning of the shona and still have the photos of the antics . We had not moved to far on before we were fired upon from the stick houses on the left. I stll think the war was a wast of lives for what?
Will always remember Steves permanent smile.
Paul Ekermans
paul@deugro.co.za
2010-07-22 11:01:20
1123 I was the platoon commander the day this happened. We were going to be picked up at a RV near the Chandelier road. We reached a shona near the pick up point and rested their in a TB for the rest of the morning. There were stray donkeys in the area and some of the guys tried to catch and ride them. Later in the day we formed up in a open area formation and crossed the shona from N to S.  Enemy fire was drawn from our left flank and we formed an attacking formation to engage the enemy. Rfn Pearson was seriously wounded in the groin and he passed away before the casevac helicopter reached the location. He died in the execution of duty he had been trained for. We will remember him - may he rest in peace. Sam Heap
samuelheap@gmail.com
2012-07-13 04:30:08
1123Yes LT Sam Heap was Platoon com for that patrol with Steve. I(Cpl Phillip Rabe) was one of the section leaders but did not go on patrol due to a bad bout of Gippo guts. SDO Pearson was on the border with 5SAI. Great Guy Steve was. RIP.Phillip Rabe
phillip@gunric.com
2015-05-25 07:05:24
1127I think this is the Cpl Pelzer who was a Corporal at 4 SAI, Delta Company in Middelburg during my basic training in July 1976, he wasnt my Platoon Sgt but he stood out as a fair corporal, very neat and "paraat" with a good black moustache - after basics I went to SP Guards and most of the 4 SAI intake were transferred to 7 SAI in Graskop, I assume that he also went there.

I heard months later that Cpl Pelzer had died on the border by diving on a hand grenade?

Some of the guys used to straighten the pins on the grenade and hook them to their webbing via the handle of the grenade - I think he or someone had taken their webbing off and hooked their thumb into the grenade ring which pulled out easily via the straghtened pins and it fell on the tent floor and he dived on the grenade?

There is only one Pelzer in this list so it seems that he is the right person, the story though is 5th hand and 34 years old - I hope it is correct.


D Sheldon
Sheldonfam@gmail.com
2011-11-12 03:17:21
1127Hi David Sheldon again - I googled Cpl Pelsers name and found the Bush War Site http://www.warbooks.co.za/blogs/news/18987379-lest-we-forget-8-march Ive copied the whole dedication as is; Im glad Ive found the real story... 38 years on.. RIP Lest we forget... 08 Mar 1977: 72430408BC Corporal Abraham Liebergh Pelser from 7 SAI in a single act of heroism, saved the lives of his fellow soldiers on the afternoon of 08 March 1977. Some of the troops used to straighten the pins on the hand grenades, making them easier to extract and then hook the grenades into their webbing via the grenade handle. Unfortunately, when Abraham took off his webbing after returning to Nkurukuru Base from a patrol, his thumb caught on the grenade pin and pulled it out. The armed M26 grenade fell onto the floor in the middle of the tent and without hesitation, he dived onto the grenade and absorbed the full force of the explosion that killed him instantly but saved the lives of all the others in the tent. He was 21. (Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends)David Sheldon
Sheldonfam@gmail.com
2015-05-18 06:58:32
1127

An update - on an unofficial website ( war in Angola) there is more information on Cpl Pelzer - although I see hisname was spelt "Pelser"

however there are more details;

died - 8 March 1977; Nr - 72430408BC; Unit - 7 SAI

RIP - Lest we forget

David Sheldon
Sheldonfam@gmail.com
2013-04-25 02:18:22
1133About 150 members of an elite Swapo unit code named 'Vulcan' had infiltrated the farming area around Grootfontein, Tsumeb, Otavi and Tsintsabis. Several farmers and farm workers were killed during this incursion, as were seven members of Alpha Company of 61 Mech Bn on 15 April 1982. They were Rfn B.J. Wolfaardt, M. Petersen, J.H. Potgieter, L.P. Hough, L/Cpl J.J. van der Berg, Cpl M.J. van Jaarsveld and 2Lt D. van der Westhuizen ("Oom Daan").

Whilst on patrol the Lieutenant sent out a section (one Ratel) to follow a couple of tracks that the tracker had picked up. The Ratel hit an ambush just after 10 am. By the time backup had formed up and went to their aid a group of soldiers had been killed.

Information extracted from www.moth.org.za
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2009-11-17 01:58:12
1137 Terrence Phillipson - we served together at Charlie coy Omega - 201Bn formely 31Bn. One of the fittest and most fearless of fighters I ever met. The last time I saw Terrence was at his wedding and shortly thereafter we received the news that he had died in a car crash close to Rundu. Enough enemy contacts - face scarred and lost half of his tongue by scrapnel - and then dies in a car accident - not for man to decide how or when... RIP Dala.K du Plessis
tradouwshoek@gmail.com
2013-07-10 08:23:12
1138Pete was in the Equestrian Unit and was based at Okatopi in Ovamboland. While on a routine patrol his horse stepped on a land mine. Pete lost a leg in the blast and after a month or two in hospital he passed away unexpectedly,  (on December 30, 1976).  We were taught during training that a horse would never step on a land mine. I believe there were two such incidents during the operations in Ovamboland.Will Currie
gandaganda80@gmail.com
2013-04-30 14:07:15
1138I was on patrol with Peter when he was killed. We had been patrolling the whole day and it was towards the evening when we set up a temporary base for the night. Before sundown a few of us were ordered to saddle out horses to make sure the area was safe. I am not sure what I was doing but Pete said I will go in your place, they had not gone 10 minutes when we heard the explosion. We could not get comms on the radio, Giellie de Kock and I rode 23 km at reord speed to get a cassavac. It was a great shock to us when we heard he had passed way.Stuart Webb
stuartwebb15@hotmail.com
2016-11-14 15:05:52
1139
  • Date: 1988-04-13
  • Full Names: Hendrik Pienaar
  • Date of birth: 1962-09-08
  • Place: Rundu
  •  Corps: SA Infantry Corps
  •  Military Number: 78402195 PE
  • Death Age: 25
  •  Unit: Sector 70 HQ, Katima Mulilo
  •  Awards: Pro Patria Medal
Marius
mariusv@xtra.co.nz
2009-09-28 21:07:32
1141

Sergeant Pienaar, from Regiment Pretoria, was the commander of an Olifant tank when a tree crushed him in his commander's hatch late November 1987.

We left Calais (approximately 3km inside Angola from Rundu) early the morning to form up with the rest of the battle group at Mavinga to participate in Ops Hooper. (Normally this is a seven day drive up to Mavinga, but it took us fourteen days to do the trip.)

After several navigational errors during the course of the day we got very far behind schedule. Due to all the delays, the squadron commander decided that we should push on through the night trying to catch up on the time lost during the previous day's excursions.

It was more or less mid night when tragedy struck. Pienaar's tank (call sign 13B) struck a tree of approximately 750 cm in diameter. Due to the soft ground and various veld fires in the past, the tree toppled onto the tank, crushing Pienaar in his hatch.
He was still alive, but severely injured at that time.

The squadron's tiffies were called upon and Rocco Greyvensteyn (a good friend of mine) tried to lift the tree from the tank with a hydraulic crane. Unfortunately the tree was too heavy for the crane and it crushed Sgt. Pienaar again which caused his death.

After this incident Rocco was never the same again. He committed suicide at Lohatla in the early 1990's.

Both of you Rest In Peace and remember the tanker's motto : "We Make The Rules"

GRossouw



2002-03-18 12:06:57
1141i was in d squdron,troop 3 ,always in the kuk,to this very day i always remember that once i was feeling down and PINE came to me and gave me a chocolot,ill never forget him.RIP NAWDISH

2008-08-18 13:36:39
1141Me and Pine were best friends we lived together and did every thing together.In our first year of training we suffered together.And in our second year we were corp. together .I remember in our fist year we had to give training to our own troops to prepare us for the new intake I was busy giving class and pine was not paying attention so I went to sit down. Pine kept on asking me if I stopped because of him,i stripped my moer and hit him on the chin ,knocked him out cold,he swallowed his tongue ,I picked him up and carried him down to medics.I felt so bad for the next two weeks I cleaned his boots his rifle his bed for inspections.But from then we were best friends for ever.I miss you my friend.Piet Roets
piet.r@gwisa.com
2017-02-12 01:31:20
114212 Sep 1968: 5167812PE Warrant Officer Class I Pieter Francois Pienaar for the South African Corps of Signals was killed when his military vehicle overturned 11 miles from Colesburg on the Naauwpoort Road. It is suspected that he fell asleep behind the wheel. He was 37.Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-12 11:12:28
1144His name was Warren Pieters and we were in 1SSB. He died en route from a training exercise. He originally came from East London and was a good friend.W Otten
ottenclan@mweb.co.za
2011-07-26 09:39:41
1147CHRIS PIETERSEN WAS MY UNCLE HE WAS 22 YEARS OLD WHEN HE DIED. HE WAS PART OF THE NEWLY COMISSIONED 31 SQUADRON AT AFB HOEDSPRUIT. HE WAS A PUMA HELICOPTER CO PILOT. HE WAS SHOT DOWN DURING OPERATION MEEBOS WITH THE REST OF THE CREW CAPT JOHN TWADDLE (COMMANDER) SGT GROBBIES GROBBELAAR (FLIGHT ENGINEER) AND 12 PARRABATS OF 1 PARRA BAT. THE A/C WAS SHOT DOWN NEAR CUVELAI WHEN 8 PUMA'S FLEW ACCIDENTLY OVER A TERRORIST CAMP. THEY WERE THE 2ND LAST A/C FLYING IN A LOOSE VIC FORMATION AND WAS SHOT IN THE TAIL GEARBOX PRESUMEBLY WITH A 14.5 AA ROUND. AL 15 MEMBERS WERE KILLED. THE 12 PARRABATS ARE BURRIED ON THE PERADE GROUND OF 1 PARA BAT IN BLOEMFONTEIN AND THEIR NAMES ARE ON THEIR WALL OF REMEMBARENCE. CAPT JOHN TWADDLE IS BURIED IN DURBAN; SGT GROBBELAAR IS BURIED IN CENTURION CEMETRY. MY UNCLE IS BURIED IN THE HERO'S ACRE IN HAMILTON BLOEMFONTEIN.HENK PIETERSEN
henkpietersen@webmail.co.za
2006-12-09 09:15:19
1147I was an apprentice working on pumas and all I can remember of that incident when lt Pietrsen left for his duties I a company his wife to her famillie in Pretoria she had a white dog if I can recall it was a poodle and then a few weeks later the sad news his chopper is down.Deon
deonherbst@gmail.com
2016-03-30 12:02:23
1150

I only found out about what happened in 1993 when I went to visit some of the guys that joined on for short Service in 1992. Cpl Mike Land told me that L/Cpl Kladis had died in a car accident along with Pte Pohl and Pte Olberholzer. Mike Land and myself were their Medical Phase instructors.

Walter Panto
walter@zotos.co.za
2010-01-27 22:04:45
1151

A LETTER FROM DES BURMAN, ONE OF THE COMMANDERS OF 32 BN, TO HIS CHILDREN

"Hi guys I wrote this letter to my kids to try to explain the issue of materialism and that money is not everything in the world. You might want to tell your kids the same. Rgds
DES

“Hello Blake and Chris,

The story of Mark Pond.

The moral of this story concerns life and materialism. Never forget this story.

I have never met a soldier who has disregard for life or is materialistic. The reason for this when you are killing people and taking lives and trying not to be killed there is nothing in this world that is more important than life. Soldiers cannot dress properly, pick their clothes, care for expensive things, need money or try to climb the social ladder. The reason for this is your clothes are all the same every day, its either camouflage or camouflage and it the same every day and you don’t have to pick.

Their home is supplied by the army, the food, the medical, the boots, the ration packs, the guns the ammo and all the rest so we don’t care a shit for anything else out there except possibly a better weapons. All soldiers are fixated by weapons. This is their tools and this is all that counts. They are all generally good survivors in ANY world. I will never be materialistic and actually don’t care a dam what other people think of what I wear or how I live etc. Also, very few soldiers have to prove anything to anybody, they have done it all. When you have to kill people, try to survive and avoid been killed and look after your mates nothing else in the world is important. Life is the ONLY important thing and you can loose it VERY fast. It is IRREPLACEABLE!!! Everything else in this world is not worth shit – it can be replaced!!

So what has this to do with Mark and what is the lesson. Its simple, Mark was killed at the age of 19 whilst under my command. He had 40 days left of the army and then he was out forever. He was the only son of a great family and the only soldier that I ever lost in almost 20 years of almost continuous combat operational deployment.

When Mom and I were living in South West Africa- Namibia and I was in the army in Rundu I was a Captain in the Special Forces tasked with some complicated operations. I worked in one of the military sectors called SECTOR 20. There were in total 10 Sectors in the country. My sector was the second worst for enemy in the area. My job was to collect information on the enemy in that area then using small combat teams of no more than 5 people find them and eliminate them. These operations were called small team operations and we often ran into very big groups of enemy. The team consisted of troops that I had trained from my old battalion 32 Battalion and captured enemy. Whenever we captured enemy soldiers, we tried to “turn” them to our cause as soon as possible and use them against their own people. We were about 90% effective with this. My team consisted of half South African black soldiers and half captured enemy soldiers. Each team had two whites. This was myself and one Non commissioned officer, usually a Sgt. These were always national white servicemen who were in the army for two years and after that were finished with the army. Any national serviceman with 40 days or less in my team I tried my best to keep out of the combat zone.

In 1986, we had a large infiltration of enemy into our sector and all units were deployed and operational. We had just captured an enemy soldier and although he was wounded, we are able to find out that the rest of his team were to meet at a specific place in the bush. I had my team but could only use Sgt Mark Pond as all the other NCO,s were deployed.

As usual, we were dropped about 5 Kms from the area where the enemy were to meet. This was done by chopper and usually at sunset. We walked to the location where the enemy were to meet. We always had heli gunships available if we had a contact and fast support if we needed it. My team at that stage was 6 people including me and Mark, the only whites.

As we approached the kraals, village where the enemy were to meet we heard taking close to us in the mealie field we crept closer and one of the captured enemy confirmed that he knew the guy talking and that he was an enemy soldier. I wanted to attack at that stage but was not able to able to as there was plenty of dead dry laves on the ground and that made a noise.

The enemy soldier was asking one of the herd boys if there were any South African soldiers in the area. The guy then disappeared into the mealie field. I knew that the rest of the enemy were on their way to the meeting spot and that the meeting would possibly take place at the kraals / village or in the village.

After dark, we approached the village and went into ambush positions. At that stage we were quite safe and in control of the situation. We were well equipped with night vision headsets and telescopes on all of our weapons so we were able to fight in the dark.

We waited all night for the enemy group to come to the village as they usually do. By early morning, they had still not arrived. At first light we moved out of the ambush position and out of the immed area to the bush line approx 200 meters from the village.

On the way to the bush, we captured a young boy with some goats. He told us that the enemy were located in the mealie field under a very big thorn tree. I knew that Mark had 4 days to go and I decided to keep him out of this firefight. I worked out that with three guys I could attack the group of enemy under the tree by crawling through the mealies up to the tree and then engaging them. I also realised that if there were any left alive they would run for the tree line.

I sent Mark out of the area to the tree line to kill any enemy who ran from the tree to the bush. I assumed that they would be safe. We were not sure of how many enemy were there but assumed it to be around 6 or 7 and we could handle that.

Once Mark was out of the area, we attacked the enemy under the tree. In the process, we killed 4 of them. The rest ran for the bush but not in the direction of Mark.

After the contact, I called Mark on the radio and told him to meet me at the tree. He was to walk directly through the mealie field to me and not through the bush as the enemy had ran into the bush. I waited under the tree.

Mark decide to walk some distance along the tree line and then through the mealie field to me. I waited for him. Not long after he had started to move, a heavy firefight started in the bush line. I could not make contact with Mark on the radio. We advanced to the tree line to the area where we heard the firing. As I walked into the bush I stumbled upon a body on the ground, the face was really white and initially I could not work out who it was. I grabbed one of the troops that were with Mark and asked where he was. They told me that he had been shot and was on the ground close to me.

A wounded enemy soldier had crawled under a dead tree trunk and as Mark walked down the path at a range of approx 5 meters has shot him in the chest. I ran back to Mark, saw his very white face and he looked bad. I had to find the wound fast as it seemed that was loosing blood fast. I had to take off his thick jacket to find the bullet entry point. I did that and only saw one bullet hole in his chest but very little blood. I called for the first aid kit and a drip. I could see that he was dying but I was unable to work out why. I then turned him over and saw this huge puddle of blood underneath him.

I realised that the bullet had hit one of he main arteries in his chest. I immediately wrapped a bomb bandage on that and connected him to a drip. He was losing blood so fast that I had to squeeze the drip to get the drip solution into him. I went through a litre of drip in max 3 minutes and put another one up. We had called for a chopper and there were armoured vehicles on their way to us (Koevoet). I was kneeling over Mark, calling his name, and shaking him to try to “get him back”. As fast as I as pumping the drip into him it was running through his system and out. After about 5 minutes as I was working on him and kneeling over him I looked into his eyes which were very blue and very open. He seemed to be looking intently at something in the sky and at that point I literally saw him go out of his body through his eyes. It all seemed as if he knew where he was going and he was on his way to something in the sky. I even looked up to what at was what he as looking at.

I was shattered when I realised that he was dead. I really lost it. I have never lost any soldiers of mine killed in contact, even after so many years in that war. I always managed to save them somehow. This was the first, he was white and only had 40 days left, and he had been in the team for almost 12 months. I was devastated!!

Very soon after that the chopper arrived and the armoured vehicles with trackers. 3 of the enemy had escaped including the one who shot Mark. My team with dead Mark were all loaded into the Puma heli and taken back to the base at Rundu. The armoured vehicle and the trackers followed the rest of the enemy and killed them later that afternoon.

I arrived at the base after approx 45 min in the chopper with Mark dead on the floor at my feet. The chopper aluminium floor was covered with blood, it dripped onto the skids of the chopper.

At the base, I had to report to the Commander immediately and make a report of the contact and the death of Sgt Mark Pond. I did this in detail. I also told the commander that I was finished with small team operations and needed to have break as I was suffering from battle fatigue and some traumatic stress. He said that he would consider this, which he never did as I was back in operations a week later.

After the debrief I went to the sickbay to talk to the doctors who were doing an examinations of Marks body. I needed to know why he had died as I had tried everything. They did a post mortem and the Doc confirmed that the bullet, the only one had totally cut one of the two main arteries running below the heart to the rest of the body – the aorta. They informed me that there was absolutely nothing that I could have done bar cut a hole in his chest and physically clamp the artery with my fingers. The aorta is approx 1.5 cm thick.

I then went home and tried to explain to Mom what had happened to Mark and me. She could not understand it. She never could understand it when I tried to explain a serious situation I had experienced in the bush. I remember lying in the bedroom of that mobile home that we had and wanting to either run away from it or drink myself to death.

A month or to later I was sent on a course in Durban - NATAL. Possibly to chill me out. I knew that Mark had come from Natal and decided to find his family. I tracked them on to Pietermaritzburg approx 100 Kms from Durban. I contacted them and told them who I was and requested a visit. I did that and had the chance to give a full description of how Mark was killed to his mother. He did not have a father, he had been killed in a car accident few years before. He was the only son and child. The mother was extremely grateful and we kept in contact. The army NEVER tells the whole story. I was also pissed off that I could not attend the funeral as I was on operations in the bush.

Nothing in the world is more important than life and when you are in a situation when the life blood of one of your mates and comrades is running out of his body into the ground and you cannot stop that and you seem him die in front of you, then that is serious. I always say that you never have a problem unless someone is about to die, then you have a huge problem. Life cannot be replaced, bought, brought back, fixed etc when it is dead.

The moral of the story is that NOTHING in this world is worth anything except life. To hell with the rest. After that comes FREEDOM. If you have those two things then you actually need bugger all else!!! Everything else is materialistic and can be bought and replaced!! Anything that does not have life is not worth shit, it can be replaced. So never, forget this story as it is the basis of freedom, courage and a healthy spirit. So the world can throw ANYTHING at you and you should never worry as it is all temporary and replaceable.

YOUR LIFE, your spirit and your freedom ------ that, they can NEVER touch!!!!

LOTS OF LOVE DAD"

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2010-01-29 21:53:50
1151

Mark completed his basic training at 5 SAI (July 1983 intake). We met when our group completed a 5 month tour and landed up at Nepara base. All NCOs and officers were invited to a braai at 905 Special Service Company, who were based in a cordoned off area of the base. We discovered that it was a recruitment drive and duly volunteered. (Against all army unwritten rules!) Five of us from 5 SAI were accepted and we served the remainder of our time at 905 with some of the most phenominal soldiers I had the honour of serving with, including Mark Pond. Unfortunately we only met a few times after that as we worked ten days on ops and two days in the base so when we did meet it was normally to sit at the pub and get drunk with Sgt. Major V. Venter! Mark was a true soldier and a good friend. R.I.P buddy.

Louis Kruger
louis@malandela.com
2013-01-03 21:37:45
1151

I was the medical officer in Nepara at the time (It was 1985) This really was a bright light going out: Cpl. Pond was a good man.

I listened to this one go down on the radio with the Int Officer (Rocco) at the time I remember this episode very clearly Mark was probably the favourite NCO of the black troops (Yetu Nawa) and was within days of uitklaar. The camp was devastated for weeks afterwards. The only consolation was that he died fast in the company of his friends. He died in the field, but was flown straight to Rundu.

I believe he was shot by a veteran SWAPO group lead by Ambi - we thought by Ambi himself (with whom I subsequently had a run-in while doing Hearts & Minds clinics in the nearby village, unarmed (which may have saved me), against Col. Swart‘s orders ... there but for the grace of God!) I spoke to the docs in Rundu who were colleagues of mine after the autopsy - even today Mark Pond would not have survived this injury. His mother, and Capt. Burman, can rest assured of that. His mother should know that he was not just brave & kind, he was also one of those people who really make a difference.

(For my sins I have been to Afghanistan 3 times to run the ICU in the main NATO hospital at Kandahar Airfield, and even with all those resources I doubt we could change the outcome)

Shiwana mwalelepo
emwenyo modile

(You can all sleep, you are all still alive)

Dr Mike Kenyon (I was a one-pip Lt at the time)

Dr (2Lt) Mike Kenyon
mike@zuludoc.com
2013-02-20 08:30:15
1153Cmdt Poole,maj AP Els and two civilians were hit by a RPG -7 & AK-47. only molenbeeck manges to escape the carnage. this happened between Mapacha and Katima Mulilo. info from 32Bn's LJ Bothma. jal
jalca@mweb.co.za
2011-01-13 19:28:41
1156killed in a accident involving a ratel.lived in east london.fellow towing the ratel also from el
dale
umbilini@isat.co.za
2013-01-01 06:59:47
1158I was present where and when this person died after being shot down during ops Savannah in a Puma helicopter. His death was not due to a crash. I tried pulling him out of the burning helicopter but was unable to do so due to heat and exploding ammunition. This was more than an aircraft crash which seems to be wrongly stated in the records. There was one survivor who was badly burnt and airlifted for treatment. Place of death - Dondo (200km South East from Luanda)
hslab@absamail.co.za
2006-07-01 18:12:58
1159About 150 members of an elite Swapo unit code named 'Vulcan' had infiltrated the farming area around Grootfontein, Tsumeb, Otavi and Tsintsabis. Several farmers and farm workers were killed during this incursion, as were seven members of Alpha Company of 61 Mech Bn on 15 April 1982. They were Rfn B.J. Wolfaardt, M. Petersen, J.H. Potgieter, L.P. Hough, L/Cpl J.J. van der Berg, Cpl M.J. van Jaarsveld and 2Lt D. van der Westhuizen ("Oom Daan").

Whilst on patrol the Lieutenant sent out a section (one Ratel) to follow a couple of tracks that the tracker had picked up. The Ratel hit an ambush just after 10 am. By the time backup had formed up and went to their aid a group of soldiers had been killed.

Information extracted from www.moth.org.za
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2009-11-17 02:02:34
1162Died 13 August 1975 as a result of a shooting accident at Rucana Airport. Unit was D Squadron attached to 2 SAI BN GP

Sam van den Berg (svdb3@iafrica.com)



2001-05-30 13:37:59
1162I remember this incident. I was with HQ Coy. of 2 SAI Bn Gp and we had just arrived from Walvis Bay by "flossie". The armour guys (2 SSB D Sqdn) arrived after us because they drove their vehicles up to Ruacana. The noddy cars were parked line astern near us and were clearing their weapons when an AD from one of the Brownings (co-axial I think) hit the chap in the car in front of him. An officer leapt to his assistance and was also hit from a second AD from the same weapon. C'est la Guerre.

2002-06-16 11:29:11
1162Sam se inligting is reg. Ons pantserkarre was in H formasie getrek met B voertuie in die middel, dit was skerp skemer toe daar 'n sarsie vuur afgaan, omtrent 4 of 5 skote. Pottie is in die blad gewond en het in sy kar ingeval, Andr? Venter het opgespring tot op die agterste luik om te help toe nog 'n skoot afgaan, hy is in die boud gewond. 'n Vliegtuig vanaf Undongwa het eers vir Andr? (wat waarskynlik die swaarste gewond was) weggeneem hospitaal toe. Met die terugkeer om Pottie te kry het hulle verdwaal en Pottie is weens bloedverlies oorlede. Pottie was 'n stil skrander ou van wie almal gehou het. Ons was almal nog baie jonk, 18/19 so dink jou in watter skok was so 'n voorval op ons 2de dag op die grens. Ek is nou 50 en nou nog as ek my o? toemaak sien ek vir Pottie en Obbes voor my. Charles Marais
charles@faconsult.co.za
2006-07-05 14:15:24
1162I did my national service Jan 1977 to Dec 1978 with 2 SSB of 2 SAI Bn Gp and one of our officers as Lt Andre Venter. So I can attest that Luietenant Andre Venter was in fact wounded while sitting on top of his car a few years previously. (Dang this brings back memories!!!)Rob Joubert
robjoubert@yahoo.com
2006-10-13 19:15:25
1162Ek was net duskant die tragedie gewees. Op ons Bedfords. Was saam met 2SAI se HK kompanie gewees, 81 mm mortiere. Ek het my boeglam geskrik, nuut op die grens, toe die browning begin hardloop. Ons het gehoor van die ou wat in die gat geskiet is. Ek het nooit geweet die persoon het gesterf nie. Hans Fouche
hans@fouchechocolates.co.za
2006-10-17 23:05:57
1162 I was there at the Ruacana airport. We had arrived by plane from Walvis Bay and were resting some distance from the runway in a temporary camp site. The armored group arrived a few hours later (they had driven from Walvis Bay) and were settling in when two series of shots were heard. The next day we were stationed at the Ruacana Falls border post with some of the 2SAI BG armored vehicles. I walked by an armored vehicle that was having the blood cleaned from it side door. This was were the officer was killed. Derek Knee
dknee5@comcast.net
2009-11-28 06:56:19
1169Johannes Lodewicus Pretorius was killed during Ops Askari, the attack on Cuvelai on 4 January 1984. The Ratel in which he was an occupant was knocked out by a T-54 tank. Wikus and five fellow soldiers were killed. His parents learned of his death when a parcel they have sent him for his birthday at the end of January was returned with the word ???oorlede??? (died) written on it. This must be the worst case of parents learning of their son being killed in the war! Even today Wikus is not mentioned in publications about Ops Askari. Usually it is stated that five soldiers were killed in the Ratel. He has no grave but a cross was erected in his memory in the Elsburg graveyard.Stephan Botha
gsbotha@absamail.co.za
2006-01-02 21:05:06
1169

Killed in Action 4th January 1984

Niel Wiid
niel@systemiclogic.net
2009-10-24 12:34:18
1171

Killed in Action 4th January 1984

Niel Wiid
niel@systemiclogic.net
2009-10-24 12:33:54
1172

I SERVED WITH SEAN AT 1 SAI BLOEMFONTEIN & ON THE BORDER (61 MECH) DEC 1983 IN ANGOLA (OPS ASKARI).

SEAN WAS SERIOUSLY WOUNDED IN A RATEL EXPLOSION & DIED A DAY OR TWO LATER. WE WERE IN THE SAME COMPANY BUT DIFF SECTIONS. WE TRIED OUR BEST TO ASSIST SEAN ON THAT FATAL DAY, BUT HIS INJURIES WERE TOO SERIOUS.

WE LOST A GOOD BUDDIE.

Terrance De Wet
doodie@telkomsa.net
2008-01-01 19:46:44
1172Goeie dag. Ek was saam met Sean Pretorius in die Ratel tydens die ontploffing. Ek kan vertel wat gebeur het. Indien iemand naby aan Sean wel die inligting sal wil ontvang, sal ek graag wil gesels. Dis baie hartseer. Ek beleef nog gereeld die trauma na 31 jr. Sean is oorlede en ek het gehoorverlies opgedoen. Elke dag word ek na die dag teruggevat, want die permanente gesuis in my ore is die geheuestokkie. Die name wat ek onthou wat die dag in die Ratel was, is: Kpl. Greeff; die drywer - Cairns; onder Kpl - Conrad Scheffer. Ek was die LMG1 - J van Schaik (noemnaam Joop)J van Schaik (Joop - noemnaam)
joop@gkrandburg.org.za
2015-03-14 01:26:54
1174

Billy was one of my guys. An unidentified person (enemy???) asked Billy for some water after an attack. The water bottle was booby trapped and went off as he filled it. Billy was killed.

Greg Smith

Greg Smith
wwgsm@woolworths.co.za
2001-09-10 11:26:56
1174Price was a great guy that wanted to help someone in need. The enemy trapped him -sad. This is how I remember him the guy that always wanted to help, cleaning the 90 canon, digging foxholes, checking engine oils etc. We caught a "springhaas" in Lohatla within minutes it was tame some of the guys wanted to cook it, but Billy refused as it was his pet. He released it the same evening -----Goodtimes buddy....Salute RIP

Wiets Coetzee
wiets@iway.na
2012-06-05 01:38:49
1174

THIS ALL HAPPENED WHILE WE ALL WENT TO O'S POSITION FOR A PRAY PARADE AND ORDERS THE DAY BEFORE D-DAY. THEY HAD TO STAND GUARD OUTSIDE THE RATELS. WHILE I WAS ON RADIO DUTY, AT 30 ALPHA POSITION, THE SHOT WENT OFF. BILLY WAS A GOOD GUY.

J MALAN
shawusafaris@lantic.net
2005-12-28 20:10:30
1178

28 Sep 1988: 87066502CK Rifleman Rionell Prins from 53 Battalion SWATF was shot dead due to the accidental discharge of a fellow soldiers rifle during operations in Southern Angola. He was 20.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-28 00:32:55
1179Cpl Prinsloo was with our company ( B Comp 203BN SWATF) in Angola at the Cuito Mine field.    The platoon was in Rattles and when the attached started they retreated ..and found out later that Cpl Prinsloo was not with them.  They went back to recover him.  He was killed by a shell from the Cuban BM21 rocket. 
I was the Officer in charge of the Helicopter pad and we gave him an present arms and send him off in the darkness of night , never to see him again.
Up to this day I will never forget that moment.

My deepest condolences to the family.  
g van der walt
gcvdwalt@gmail.com
2010-06-23 05:00:41
1186

Lt John Purdon received his wings at Dunottar with my brother Lt Eric Thompson in 1974, they where both posted to 11 squadron in Potch. he was like a family member as he spend most of his weekend passes at my parents house. My brother went MIA in Angola 1975, however John still remained part of the family until his death in 1977.

Unknown

2007-07-25 11:57:47
1186

I am the niece of Lt John Purdon, i am looking for any information regarding my uncle as i have no other forms of trying to locate information. If ther is anyone out there that might have known him.

 

All I know is that my uncle died during a flight this all information i was ever given

Tracy
tracypurdon@gmail.com
2010-03-15 15:55:57
1191

27 Sep 1984: 80403264BG Trooper Jeams Andries Solomon Theodorus Randall from 2 Special Service Battalion was killed in a military vehicle accident at Zeerust. He was 20.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-27 04:23:20
1192

On 20 May 1983, the MK (ANC) Special Operations Unit planted a car bomb in Church Street, Pretoria, outside the building housing the administrative headquarters of the South African Air Force. The explosion killed twenty-one people (eleven of whom were employees of the SAAF and two of whom were MK operatives) and injured 217. Flight Sergeant Jacobus Johannes Ras was one of those killed.

Peter Chapman
chappiep@hotmail.com
2006-03-07 03:58:43
1193A J Rautenbach, Andr??, died in January 1976 in Rundu base, as a result of a shooting accident. I think it was the 10th. We were three riflemen and one lance coporal who sat and chat in the Ovambo bunker at Rundu. Rauties was sitting next to me on my bed when the Lance corporal, Wimpie, shot him by mistake. Wimpy, who sat right opposit Rauties, had a brand new R1, from one of the other guys, in his hands and was checking through the sights when Rauties made a joke and told Wimpie to line it up on him, Rauties. Whithout knowing that the rifle was loaded, he did so and pulled the trigger. Rauties was hit in the mouth and died immediately. We ran out of the tent and summoned for help, but it was to late. It was a very traumatic experience for all of us. Andr?? v d Merwe
acdvandermerwe@gmail.com
2015-10-13 03:29:50
1195

I believe this guy was on the border with me at 61 Mechanised Battalion, at a place known as Omathiya, just north of the Oshivelo gate in sector 10. We were from 4 field Artillery in Potch and were sent to the border from Dec 1984 to Dec 1985. The guys were on a training shoot with 120mm mortars when his mortar tube exploded after dropping a mortar into the device. Apparantly there was a hairline crack in the tube which caused it to blow up killing him instantly.

RIP

Lynton Hiles
lyntondebra@hotmail.com
2007-05-19 07:51:04
1196L/Cpl Redelinghuys was an Ops Medic who died after sustaining injury during Operation Modular. After the Rinkhals he was assigned to broke down, the medics ( Redelinghuys and 2nd Lt Davis ) stayed with their vehicle when it was recovered by a Wit Hings - While being towed they came upon a T54 that turned and attacked them - the driver of the Wit Hings - A Sgt close to Retirement and the doctor - 2nd Lt Davis - were slightly injured - Redelinghuys was cassavaced and died in Rundu - Date unknown

2001-05-30 13:37:59
1196I served in the same group as Louis, having done basic training in Potch and then Ops training in Pretoria. Although I didn't know him well personally, his death affected us all deeply as he was the first person from our training group to be killed.

2002-02-28 13:30:10
1196I was the crew commander of a Ratel 90 (Call sign T31) that casevaced L/Cpl Redelinhuys, Lt Davis and Staff Sargeant 'Blackie' Swart. I was ferrying T31 to the rear eschelon, as the main cannon had malfunctioned - T31A (my vehicle) was then swopped with T31, although I took my gunner (Trooper Bruwer) with me and used the original driver (Trooper Brits) - and I set off on the lone logistics run. We unexpectantly ran into a skirmish involving a T54 and a Stalins organ, both of which had opened up on a Withinks towing a Rinkals. We laid covering fire with the two Bowning 7.62'MG's and managed to scare the tank off, although the stalins organ managed to unleash its full load on us. We reversed when we came under fire and got stuck in a tree, when the driver promptly abandoned myself and my gunner . Staff Sargeant Swart run to us for help and took the drivers seat. We then drove to the Rinkals and casevacced both Lt Davis and L\Cpl Redelinhuys, then set off to find the nearest friendly position ASAP. I contacted my Squadron (C Squadron, 4SAI) on the radio and we were guided in by flare and radio directions, by our 2IC, Captain Steynberg. L/Cpl Redelinhuyswas still alive when we got back to the forward base, but died shortly afterwards. I believe that Staff Sargeant 'Blackie' Swart was later awarded the Honorus Crux for his part in the casevac.Paul Gladwin
gladwin@mailfly.com
2007-11-03 15:26:58
1196Johan Redelinghuys was saam met my op skool in Randburg. Ek was ook gestasioneer in Rundu en toe op OPS(Moduler-1987) gestuur vir amper 3 maande in Angola tot so ver as Cuito Carnevale (approx 400km binne Angola). Henk Wybenga L/bdr AA (part of 62 mech)Henk
henkw@trenstar.co.za
2007-11-30 10:42:03
1196 Adendum to my story above: It was Sergeant 'Lappies' Labuschagne that drove the vehicle and later received the HC for his actions on this days, not Staff Sergeant Swart. Also casevaced that day was Private Spencer, a member of Sergeant Labuschagne's recovery team. Paul Gladwin
gladwin@mailfly.com
2010-01-14 11:27:37
1197Rfn. Remmington of Infantry School died in a Buffel roll-over in the Oshivello area while on a night operation in pursuit of SWAPO raiders out the Tsumeb area. The Buffel was driven by Lt. Koekies Koekemoer.


Edward Hillary
ehillary@shaw.ca
2012-07-17 01:17:07
1197Rfn. Remmington of Infantry School died in a Buffel roll-over in the Oshivello area while on a night operation in pursuit of SWAPO raiders out of the Tsumeb area. The Buffel was driven by Lt. Koekies Koekemoer.


Edward Hillary
ehillary@shaw.ca
2012-07-17 01:24:45
1198

30 Sep 1988: 86539533BG Sapper Robert Renison from the Army Battle School was killed when he accidentally shot himself in the chest while playing with his firearm in the Duty Room at Lohathla. He was 18.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-30 12:12:01
1199

A. D. Renken . [1199] Killed Border

Age : 27

Mil. No : 75338285BT

Grave in Kirkwood [E Cape]

Dirk Schellingerhout
jodis@mailbox.co.za
2007-03-18 09:54:02
1199

His full names were Andries David.

Hendrik
hendrik.els@mweb.co.za
2010-09-16 22:08:39
1201

Sgt Dirk (or Dick) Retief was the Flight Engineer on a puma that was shot down on the 6 September 1979, whil seconded to the Rhodesian Airforce.  The pilot, Lt Paul Velleman and Co-Pilot, Lt Nigel Osborne were also killed. I believe they were carrying ammunition and got hit by a RPG7.

Unknown
Unknown
2009-05-27 09:52:41
1201

Search for Puma Lost at Mapai

April 11, 2009 - April 14, 2009

Under the cover of darkness, on the night of the 6th September 1979, I was flown out of the forward admin area of Op Uric, situated deep in the Mozambique bush, to our Operational Forward HQ situated at Chipinda Pools. I was the sole passenger in the SAAF Puma that evening, and my task was to sort out notices for the casualties sustained earlier that day, when a SAAF Puma (See Photo 1) carrying elements of 1 Commando 1RLI and 2 Engineer Squadron had been shot down on the outskirts of Mapai (Rail) formerly known as Jorge de Limpopo, killing all 17 on board. During the 40 odd minute flight back to the Rhodesian border, I vowed that I would one day return to the crash site to honour my friends and comrades in arms who had made the supreme sacrifice that morning, but who, because of the expediency of the battle, had had to be left behind where they had died.

29 years later I was privileged enough to be invited to join Bob Manser's expedition to find the Donaldson Canberra lost over the Malvernia area in January 1977. It became plainly obvious during this search, that the local police, militia, and Mozambicans were more than willing to assist in the location of these war sites and bore absolutely no malice towards their former adversaries. It was then that I realised that it was possible to honour the pledge I had made in 1979. Slowly over a period of 5 months I was able to assemble a "Team" for the Mapai expedition by using the members of Bob's Canberra party as the nucleus.

Regrettably both Bob and Alistair Macrimmon were both unable to make it and so Neill Jackson ex Support Commando, "Stan" Standish White ex SAS volunteered their services. Added to these "volunteers" were Eastern District farmers Duff Odendaal and his son in law, Gareth Barry. The final search team was thus made up as follows:

  • Rick van Malsen
  • Kevin Jones
  • Malcolm Macrimmon
  • Neill Jackson
  • "Stan" Standish White
  • Duff Odendaal
  • Gareth Barry

Nearly two hundred E mails were sent out globally as we planned, sourced information, obtained eye witness accounts, speculated on where the actual site was, made up introductory letters and catch phrases in Portuguese, sorted out admin and log etc. It finally all came together and on Thursday 11th April 2009 "The Team", complete with wives, converged on Mabalahuta camp in the southern Gonarezhou National Park.

Friday 12th April was used as a rest day and was used to prepare ourselves for the trip to the search area. Later in the afternoon we held a final formal briefing of what to expect, where we were going etc.

Saturday 13th April 2009 we rose early and in two vehicles, left camp at 0500 hours so that we could be at the border at 0600 hours, the supposed opening time. True to form, the bleary-eyed border officials only arrived at 0645, which meant we only got through the border formalities at 0800 hours, 1 hour behind our planned timings. The road down to Mapai remains mostly unchanged over the last 30 years. Trains derailed by various SF operations that many years ago, were still in evidence, as well as many shot out buildings. We all just hoped that Stan's contribution to the road had been removed, as he couldn?t remember where he had buried them.

At 1030 hours we arrived in Mapai (Rail) and asked directions the police station. This was a broken down 2 room building that could have passed for a toilet. Not an auspicious start! A young policeman read our letter of introduction and said that we needed to see the local military or garrison Commandant. He then went off to find him but returned to say he was not there. We were then taken to the head of FRELIMO party for the area. Arlindo Penicela Baloi, who, although unable to speak English, was able to read our letter of introduction. Thank heavens for Bob's notes! He reiterated that we had to go back and get the Garrison Commandant's permission.

Back down the road again and fortunately the Commandant was now at home and after reading our letter cheerfully gave permission for us to go to the crash site, but insisted we had to get the local headman?s blessing first. Protocol reined supreme! Now accompanied by Arlindo we set off to site. Suddenly Arlindo stopped me and spoke to a portly gentleman on the side of the road who turned out was able to speak English. Wallah a translator! Solomone, the translator, climbed in and off we went.

We followed a track leading directly East from the main road for about 3 kms when we stopped at a small village where, seated under a tree, was the local headman Araujo Chivite. After a brief discussion between my other two passengers and Araujo, he readily agreed to show us where the site was. With Araujo's 2ic also in tow, (now making 5 of us in a king cab!) we then continued down the track which gradually turned South where we intersected the main Mapai/Machaila road about 3.7 kms from Mapai (Rail)

We had only gone a few metres down the road when we were told to stop and on getting out of the vehicle, we were shown an area which we were told was the crash site. An initial search turned up a partially burnt SF water bottle and then we started finding the unmistakable signs of an aircraft crash. There was a large mound in the centre of the site and this, we were told, was where the soldiers killed in the crash were buried.

We had brought a prefabricated cross complete with a base with us and asked permission to erect this on the site. Araujo immediately agreed but only on condition the site was cleaned up first, which they insisted on doing themselves! These were recovered and brought back with us. Once the cross had been erected, a brief service was held, using the exact format as Bob had used at the other sites, and the Roll of Honour read out. This is repeated below for those who have not seen it.

  • "With thanksgiving, let us remember those who sacrificed their lives so that we may live on in peace, and in appreciation, we now dedicate this cross to their memories. Help us to keep them in our thoughts, and never forget what they gave for us."
  • CAPT JOHANNES MATHEUS DU PLOOY 1 RLI
  • CAPT CHARLES DAVID SMALL ENG 2ND
  • LT BRUCE FRASER BURNS ENG
  • SGT MICHAEL ALAN JONES ENG
  • CPL LEROY DUBERLEY ENG
  • CPL GORDON HUGH FRY 1 RLI
  • L/CPL PETER FOX ENG
  • TPR JACOBUS ALWYN BRIEL 1 RLI
  • TPR AIDEN JAMES COLEMAN 1 RLI
  • TPR MARK JEREMY CROW 1 RLI
  • TPR BRIAN LOUIS ENSLIN 1 RLI
  • TPR STEVEN ERIC KING 1 RLI
  • TPR COLIN GRAHAM NEASHAM 1 RLI
  • TPR DAVID REX PROSSER 1 RLI
  • CAPT PAUL VELLERMAN SAAF
  • LT NIGEL OSBORNE SAAF
  • F/SGT DICK RETIEF SAAF

"They shall not grow old As we that are left, grow old Age shall not weary them, nor do the years condemn, At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them"

Neill then repeated the words of the service in Afrikaans in memory of the South African crew. Finally the "Last Post" was played. At all stages of the service the Mozambique contingent were actively involved which we all found very humbling and magnanimous. At the end of the proceedings headman Araujo called a woman called Lydia, who was farming the surrounding fields, and instructed her to build a fence around the site so that the war graves can be looked after properly in the future.

After leaving an appropriate reward with the headman for this to be done, we packed up and left the site, each in our own thoughts. After dropping off Araujo at his village, we returned to Mapai (Rail) and then decided to go down to the old Mapai airfield and Mapai (River) both targets of the Scouts column raid in June 1977. Arlindo and Solomone both accompanied us on this leg, which rather inhibited us from scouting around too much for old military positions.

At Mapai (River) we were shown a mass grave, covered by a concrete slab, which we were told held the civilian victims of this raid. Expedition members showed the appropriate respect at this site. We then returned to Mapai (Rail), dropped off our two passengers and headed off back towards the border.

Our next task was to return to the site of the Donaldson Canberra crash site in order to place a more permanent memorial to the airmen lost in this crash. Time was running short, so we dispensed with protocol and just drove direct to the site. After placing the cross, we sounded the "Last Post" which was particularly fitting as the sun was starting to set as the sound of bugles rang out hauntingly through the silent bush. We then had to rush for the border before it closed, which we got through without any problems and headed for home, arriving at 20 00 hours.

We had travelled a total of 360 kms in 15 hours. There are many people involved in making a trip, such as this, the success it was.

My grateful thanks go to the following:

  • First and foremost to Bob Manser, who pioneered searching for these forgotten sites. Bob gave us all his notes to use, offered invaluable advice and encouragement throughout
  • Prop Geldenhuys for all the help, encouragement and research done on our behalf.
  • Eyewitness accounts from Gavin Wehlburg, Jono Lane and Keith Dell all helped to get an overall picture of approximately where we had to look.
  • To the ex Rhodesians of Francistown, who fabricated the crosses, galvanised them and then painted them all at no cost. They looked magnificent.
  • To the 5 wonderful Mozambicans who took the time out to guide us and asked for nothing in return. You were a wonderful example of what true reconciliation should be. There is absolutely no doubt that this war memorial will be looked after by these people.
  • And lastly to the most wonderful "team" without whom, none of this would have happened. All rallied to the call, and freely gave up their valuable time and at personal cost, to be there.

"Thank you" is not enough.

RICK VAN MALSEN
FRANCISTOWN
Leon
Leonbez@lantic.net
2009-11-20 19:35:26
1202

Please see the story posted for Lt C.J. Robin for the story.

Duncan Mattushek
mattushek@xtra.co.nz
2010-04-08 23:44:31
1204

L/cpl Reyneke was a member of 4 SAI Bn, attached to 53 Bn (Alpha Coy). He was stationed at Etale, 18 km from the Angolan border.

In early 1982, Reyneke was assigned to an escort detail that was to protect a Water Works JCB that had the task of repairing the water pipeline between Charlie Tower at Engela hospital and Eenhana. On the way there the JCB got stuck in the mud on several occasions.

Reyneke and his buddy (Nel), got off the armoured vehicle and stayed close to the JCB with the intention of assisting it through the mud whenever it got close to getting stuck. From this point on, the going was really good, until the JCB detonated a landmine with one of it's back wheels.

Reyneke was killed instantly.

Unknown

2002-02-13 00:46:09
1207

L Cpl Carlos Alberto Correia Pinto Ribeiro (little Robbie) joined the SADF in 1975. He was a member of 1 Reconnaissance Commando.

Little Robbie, as he is fondly remembered by his colleagues, went missing believed killed during a contact between Luenge and Coutada do Mucusso about a week before S Sgts Roxo and Soeiro were killed, much further south along the Okavango river. He was driving a Unimog loaded with a ton or more of explosives when he ran into an ambush while the company he served in was on its way back to Buffalo. He was probably hit by a RPG 7 which meant that the whole truck exploded and his remains could not be recovered. It was because of this incident that Col Breytenbach sent Ribeiro senior home to visit his mother after the second ambush in which Daniel Roxo et al were killed and which led to Robbie Ribeiro also getting killed in that nasty incident on the Golden highway.

At the time Carlos Alberto went missing in action he was seconded to B Group in Rundu (32 Bn).

What a tragic time for the Ribeiro family, loosing the two brothers in a week. Little Robbie was single.

Before joining the SADF, L Cpl Ribeiro was a Paratrooper with the Portuguese Defense Force.

L Cpl Carlos Alberto Correia Pinto Ribeiro's name should appear on the ROLL OF HONOUR of the Special Forces and 32 Battalion.

Manuel Ferreira
manuelferreira@eject.co.za
2009-05-13 21:10:22
1207At 05H00 on 19 August 1976, a convoy of six Unimogs and one Bosvark set off from Luenga, Angola, to the south. Due to the bad state of the roads being travelled on, the Unimogs bunched up and the one being driven by L/Cpl Ribeiro took the lead. 

At 07H30 the convoy ran into a FAPLA ambush, and the lead Unimog received a direct hit from an RPG-7, running over a mine at the same time. L/Cpl Ribeiro was presumed killed in the resultant explosion of his vehicle, his body never being retrieved.

Information extracted from "32 Battalion - The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit" by Piet Nortje.
Peter
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-11-30 00:35:49
1209Barry Craig Rieder. I cry as I write this for you. I address this to all who knew Barry. I am now 58 and served 6 months on the border in 1976 I recall it was Operation Savanna. That I shall leave for another day. I was involved it active combat , was one of the men that built Old Eenhana and was involved in the new camp. Beside all this I was fortunate enough to go to Luanda in 2005 with the IDC. Barry I dedicate this to you. You my buddy my best friend I miss not talking to you in nearly 38 years. Few people would know you and your family like me. You were the youngest son of Valerie and Walley Rieder, your dad sat telling us stories for hours about WW2. You were so so talented. The best cartoonist in the world. You bought my Ibaneze guitar you nagged me for and hence wound up on the border with you. I took that guitars brother to SWA. I grew up with you , we met when you were 5. Your family, Alan,Chester,Joan and Brian the eldest and a drummer loved you dearly. Your dad was besotted with you. You and I fishing , the old Ford Taunus, the little colt car we could barely fit into.Those were the days. The hours and hours I spent teaching you guitar,your humour,your smile, You would have driven all the young girls crazy. The time you spent at Newton Park Tech. You epitomised the word gentleman. Barry I often cry when I think about you and how tragic a loss of life for what we fought was so unjust and disgusting that I am nauseated when I see the face of the likes of the PW Bothas and criminals that cost us valuable years. Your death is loaded onto their souls as they burn in the embers of eternal hell. Barry today I am a businessman a successful one and when I visit my warehouse in PE I go to your grave in Forest Hill and I am saddend. I saw your dad when I was in PE , The last time before he passed on to be with you was in 2002.He was a broken man,crying,your mom was crying. She was so excited along with your dad to see me. You dad asked questions, Glen he asked , how can Barry not be here, ithats my baby, what happend to him, your dad would not stop with questions, he was 80. I had no answers i had been in the thick of things myself and i sat speechless. What do you say when a father loses a son. But to them you were oh so so special. I went to your room, I used to sleep on the floor , this time I sat on your same bed and I sat there for an hour. My beloved wife Desiree passed away of cancer in 2011, I was consoled by her as she had heard so much about you. The boat you and your dad built , Suealljeanbar. Sundays river , a happy place, Lady your beloved dog. And so life like an ever rolling stream bears all its sons away, there are still those like us who remember you. You were kind,gentle,honest,talented and sharp with wit. you are graceful and God the creator the entity that levels the playing field, the alpha and omega has you in the palm of his hands, You will not be forgotten , never. For every night I close my eyes, I will pray for you.Glen Kruger..born 1957..residing in SA and USA
glenk@polka.co.za
2015-03-08 11:40:36
1212The Cpl Rix that I knew was known as Rhian.He died in a contact on the Friday the 13 of April 1979 around 11:30 pm near okatope base south of Ondangwa.He was my section leader of platoon 3 section 1.We where attacked on our last patrol before going home from the Border.3 Other guys also where wounded in the attack.one of them was Rfn Booysen ,who was asleep next to me.he was badily wounded and we never saw him again. Rhian was 18 or 19 years old .His family farmed in Philipie in the cape. Grapes I think.I still have photos of all the guys in my platoon.If anyone wants to contact me on this matter e-mail Dennis Finch natalchef@aol.comDennis Finch
natalchef@aol.com
2004-12-12 17:48:27
1212

I knew Rhian well, was in the same Comp. I was also at his funeral in the Cape. Friends may contact me.

Stef de Klerk
stefdk@gmail.com
2009-03-11 22:37:11
1212 I remember well , I had returned from patrol and was assigned gate guard duty , when cpl Rix and his section left the base , the gate area was flooded from the summer rains,. The following morning we were called from the water hole up the road Okatope base, as the section had been hit .Bosman and a mortorist , Rousseau, were badly injured. I saw Rousseau@ i mil in the Nov of 79 , he was still recovering but in a baway, and bumped into Bosman some years later in civi street.....fondly remembered Massimo Lupini
massilupini@iburst.co.za
2009-10-13 22:17:54
1212 I remember well , I had returned from patrol and was assigned gate guard duty , when cpl Rix and his section left the base , the gate area was flooded from the summer rains,. The following morning we were called from the water hole up the road from Okatope base, as the section had been hit .Bosman and a mortorist , Rousseau, were badly injured. I saw Rousseau@ one mil in the Nov of 79 , he was still recovering but in a bad way, and bumped into Bosman some years later in civi street.....To Cpl Rix s family and friends , after all these years I still think of that tragic day , and remember him ... Massimo Lupini
massilupini@iburst.co.za
2009-10-13 22:24:33
1214I was with Roberts the day of the accident, we were busy shoot with our G5 when after a few shots we had a miss fire, Roberts was the one shooting the gun he walked up to the gun and as soon as he touched the mechanism to reset to fire again the gun went off by itself, Roberts was right behind the gun and the recoil of the barrel him on the side of his hip he was unconscious immediately and never regained consciousness. We heard once or twice that he was ok after been cassevaced to 1 Mil but I only found out +- 4 years after militry service that he passed on. To this day i still think of him alot and what could have been, this accident is imprinted in my head for everR v Heerden
rocco.vanheerden@tskzn.co.za
2010-06-25 08:12:50
1216

Christopher Robin was my Platoon Leader. He went to Artillery School then was posted to 4th Field Regiment.

We went to the Caprivi together and then in November our Regiment went into Angola. We had just completed a 10 day patrol when the next platoon had to move out and take up an ambush position on the Zambian/Angolan border. Christopher went with the vehicles that were going to drop off the platoon near the ambush site and return with them. A landmine exploded right underneath him and he subsequently died from his injuries sustained.

Christopher was one of three good friends I lost in the next two days. He will always be remembered as a kind, understanding person.

Duncan Mattushek
mattushek@xtra.co.nz
2006-03-13 07:32:50
1216

What Duncan doesn't say is that he was involved in the tragedy that struck down Lt Robin. He was a Platoon Sargeant. He lost both his arms due to the searing explosion, and after a very long recuperation period, made an amazing recovery. He became a karate black belt, and is today a successful dairy farmer. Chris would be proud!

Johann Olivier
johannolivier@comcast.net
2006-08-31 02:57:41
1216

Hi John,

As  you can see I have attached the newspaper articles for you. The story does vary a bit ... typical journalism, so I shall write it out for you.
This is from my experience of what happened and also thanks to Lt. Andre Brand who was present at the whole incident. So I have taken from both of our encounters and have written what actually happened. It could not be more accurate and truthful than this.
I also have included an article on my wedding day to my lovely wife. We have just celebrated 29 yrs. of marriage.
I did notice in the Unit deaths, you only had one person killed from 4th Field Regt. I would like to add Gunner Christo Retief as well as Lt. Chris Robin. I do know there were more gunners killed from 4th Field Regiment, but do not know their names.

  • Lt C. Robin no is 1216
  • Gnr C. Retief no is 1202
  • Rfn Schonfeldt is 1271

The photos are:

  • Robin 1 & 2 is the newspaper article on Lt. C. Robin,
  • Rinty 1 & 2 is the newspaper article on Rfn Schonfeldt
  • Rinty 3 is the photo of Scheunfeldt and his dog Rinty
  • Brand is the unveiling of the Gunners Memorial at 4th Field Regiment November 1976 by Lt. Brand (in uniform) and myself
  • NS12_01 & NS12_02 is an article and photo of my wedding day.

This is the first time I have ever written a detailed account to someone about the incident other than for my own records. So I would appreciate it and I am sure you will, to use your discretion as to where and how it will be made public.

The story......................

(I almost want to head it "The forgotten soldiers" as we seem to have been forgotten so early on in the Bush War and it needs to be recorded)


I commenced my National Service in January 1974. I was told to report to 4th Field Regiment, Potchefstroom. I was 18 years old. At this stage all National Servicemen were called up for a period of one year. After about six weeks of basic training, were called up to parade and informed that National Service had now been extended to either 18 months or 2 years. I chose the two year period as I wanted to get my National Service over and done with.

I then attended Artillery School and became an instructor.

Lt. Chris Robin was my Lt. for our platoon and I, his platoon bombardier. We were both in 42 Battery, 4th Field Regiment. Our Regiment Commander was Commandant Nel. Our Battery Commander was Captain Theron.

The following year our Regiment was due for border duty. After a while in the Caprivi, our Regiment being based at Kwando and Mpacha, was informed that we were going into Angola.

We left our base in Kwando and set off in convoy and arrived south of Luiana and set up our base camp. We set out on patrols and gathered whatever information we could on any form of movement by insurgents in the area.

I had become great friends with Rfn. Scheunfeldt as he was our dog handler for our platoon.

On the 12th November 1975, a message was recieved by our base that Lt Brand and his platoon had to go and set up an ambush about 5-6 hours drive north of Luiana. This area was known to be a SWAPO infiltration area. I asked to go with so as to give a bit more firepower for the platoon.

Two vehicles, a Hippo and an Unimog, were loaded with all our gear and were going to drop us off at a point, then we would walk the rest of the way and set up the ambush. Lt. Brand drove in front with the Hippo to locagte the area where we were to disembark. Lt.Robin came with, so that he could drive with one of the vehicles back. The driver of the Unimog was Gunner Huisaman. Gunner Retief was one of the drivers as well.

I was sitting on the Unimog with my friend Scheunfeldt and his dog (Rinty). We had supplies for 7 days. The Hippo drove in front of us. Lt. Robin was sitting in the passenger seat of the Unimog.

The next thing I remember was a massive flash and then darkness. This was at about 17H00 on the 13th November.

I remember waking up and looking at my right hand with the full moon in the background and seeing all this skin just hanging from it. I could not feel my left arm at all. I could neither feel that the rest of my body had been burnt as well.

All of the soldiers were blown off the Unimog. As I was gripping the side of the vehicle with my left arm, when the blast went off, my natural instinct was to grab. This caused me to stay on the vehicle and take the blast up my left side. I was also sitting on top of the diesel tank of the vehicle. This caused the diesel to splash and burn on me.

Gunner Hennie Bekker who had been blown off by the blast, ran back into the inferno and pulled me off. His hands were badly burnt and I owe this man my life for the courageous thought he had for me.

When Lt. Brand came to the burning vehicle, he saw Lt. Robin lyng about two meters away from the burning vehicle. He gave orders to the remaining soldiers to take care of the injured and then went to attend to Lt. Robin. His left leg was completely missing, his whole face was burnt, his hair was scorched and his arms were badly mutilated. Lt. Brand carried Lt. Robin away to a safe area.

Lt. Brand then got the remaining soldiers and set up a perimeter defence. Lt. Robin was still alive at this time. Lt. Brand applied mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. He recalls how the smell of burnt flesh stayed with him for many months after.

Lt. Brand informed the medic to go and help where he could, but the medic replied that he didn't have any form of medical kit, as it had been burnt in the explosion. The radio gear had also been destroyed.

Lt Brand kept Lt. Robin alive for about 15 minutes, then he succumbed to his injuries. Lt. Brand and Lt. Robin were great friends. Lt. Brand then went to attend to the other injured. He then came back and sat with Lt Robin and the other injured, and read from his bible, Psalm 138.

Immediately after the explosion Lt. Brand sent Gunner Nel with the Spook back to the main base for help.

Lt. Brand went to assess the firepower they had left and found of the 27 soldiers with rifles, they could only managed to salvage seven rifles and some ammuntion. He then set about, presuming the helicopters would arrive shortly, to casevac the dead and injured out, and set up a landing area by marking it with weighed down bundles of toilet paper. He also made piles of grass, to light if the helicopters came in after sunset. Lt Brand also had to chase away a herd of elephants that had wandered into the area later on.

They waited all night for some reinforcements to arrive.

The next morning at about 07H00, two helicopters arrived to casevac the dead and wounded out. Lt. Brand asked the pilots for their rifles as well as asking them to please return with reinforcements. The injured and dead were loaded and flown out to Katimo Mulilo.

The next morning at about 09H00 the group were attacked by about 70 SWAPO terrorists. They fired AK 47's, mortars and RPG's.

The soldiers on Lt. Brand's command, started moving away from the area, using the "buddy-buddy" system. He told them to move south towards the Luiana River. Gnr Retief and Rfn. Scheunfeldt were two of the last to leave the area with Lt. Brand. The three of them kept up the covering fire while the others retreated. Two other soldiers got wounded in the arm.

Lt.Brand soon realized that it had become quiet from the area that Retief and Scheunfeldt were retreating from. There was no more covering fire from their position.

The SWAPO terrorists shouted in jubilation when they saw the burnt-out vehicle and numerous shots were fired. After a while, when it became quiet, Lt. Brand went back to see what had happened to Retief and Scheunfeldt. Lt. Brand found both Retief and Scheunfeldt and Scheunfeldt's dog, Rinty, lying dead next to them. Lt. Brand removed their watches and dog tags so they would not be mislaid somewhere, and could be returned to family. The SWAPO terrorists had killed them and then shot them again at close quarter range.

Lt. Brand and Gunner van Tonder stayed with the dead bodies that night, as they didn't want any wild animals to get to them. The rest of the group had moved out of the area and attempts to make contact with them was unsuccessful. Two helicopters came and picked them all up the next morning.

In between, when the Spook was sent back to base for help, Captain Theron who was the base commander, loaded the ambulance with as many rifles he could find and set out to help Lt. Brand. On the way he suffered a tyre blow-out and kept on driving. When he realized that it was getting dark and his vehicle was not driveable if he came into contact with SWAPO, he turned around and headed back to base.

The other soldiers who had dispersed when SWAPO attacked them, were tracked down by Bosbok plane later and helicopters were sent in to lift them out.

A Hercules had been flown up from South Africa to fetch us. I remember being loaded onto the helicopter in Angola and as we took off spilt my guts out over the savannah below. I next awoke lying in the back of the Hercules, quite doped up having recieved medical attention at Katimo Mulilo. Our second in command for the regiment, Major Bosch, was there to wish us well.

I arrived in 1 Military Hospital 23 hours after the incident. I remember the medic cutting what was left of my pants off on the way to hospital, in the ambulance. I was to spend 8 hours in theatre where they amputated my left arm and right hand and treated my burns. When I spoke to the surgeon later, he said he only gave me a 2% chance of survival when I was taken into theatre seeing I had suffered 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th degree burns over my body. He said one of my saving graces was that I was still young and exceptionally fit and healthy, otherwise my body would have shut down long ago...

I spent 9 months and 8 further operations in hospital recieving skin grafts, physiotherapy, (fortunately I only had to confront the physcologist once and told him to leave me alone, which he did) and attended rehabilitation therapy.

The smell of burnt flesh is with me always, the phantom pains, the knowledge that I shall never forget what happened as I get up every day to wear 2.5 kg of plastic and steel to get on with life. To remember the weeks of having my new skin pulled off my back.

I was an exceptional case to the nursing staff and they did not know how to cope with someone like me who had suffered such injuries. It was only weeks later that a nursing sister changed the procedure. I was the first one to have lost both arms in the country. (This I know from the orthopeadic prosthetic makers, both in Johannesburg and Durban)

One of my gunners, who had bad burns to the face and hands, also was in hospital, by the name of Mark Niewenhuisen. We were placed in private rooms with absolutely no access to the public or to unnessary medical staff. Military Police were placed outside our rooms to enforce this.


To Lt. Robin. Gunner C. Retief and Rifleman Scheunfeldt, you will always be remembered.
To Lt.Brand and the other Gunners who took care of us, you shall not be forgotten.


I shall end the story here, as the next 34 years are my personal experiences in dealing with everyday challenges, my achievements in life and living life.

I shall forever be grateful to my parents and brothers and to my lovely wife,Irene, her parents and our two lovely children for their support and love over the years.

Well John, I hope this is worth placing somewhere. Please keep me up to date with what is happening.

Thanks
Duncan Mattushek

PS: If you ever come across a Bdr Roeloff van Wyk, who served in 1975 in 4th Field Regiment, please let me know. He has photo's of the Unimog just after it exploded and subsequent photos. I have tried in vain to contact him. He came from the South Coast.

Duncan Mattushek
mattushek@xtra.co.nz
2010-04-08 23:18:34
1216                               

My Story ? Angola War

Overview: - I, Frikkie Bekker, commenced my military service in January 1975. From Durban we travelled to our base in Potchefstroom. I was enrolled in 42 Battery, 4

th Field Regiment. During my service there I played rugby and did athletics. Our commanding officer was Captain Theron.

Towards the end of the year, we went to do our border duty. We were based at Mapacha. After a few weeks we were moved to Kwando. Arriving at Kwando, we had heard that 2 weeks prior a panzer car unit had hit a landmine and we were told there was only one survivor. We did our regular patrols in the Kwando area. One day, we walked through a camp that was hit by terrorists (when the SAPS still did border patrols), it was called Sherilongwe. We also stood at the beacon where the 3 countries came together. After a few weeks we were sent to a bush camp where the Luiana River and the Kwando river met.

One morning on patrol , (after a couple of hours) we came upon a terrorist ambush site. It was an opening in-between a dense bush. We sent our scouts through to investigate, fortunately , there was no activity at that time. We searched the site and dug up mortars and AK47 ammunition that was buried under fire places and saw all the dug in sites that were prepared for ambush. Further on we found a dam, being hot, we thought that we would give each troop a chance to jump in and cool down in the water, we found boots and ammunition wrapped in plastic bags beneath the water. Shortly after that we had a radio message from the camp that they were sending a truck to collect us as we were not going to proceed with this patrol. They picked us up and on arrival at the camp, we were told that we were going to set up an ambush position further in Angola due to terrorist activity in that area.

About 2pm, we had all our equipment ready to lay this ambush, we had mortars, strims, claymore mines, etc. We had a Unimorg that was not landmine prepared as it was brand new. We had to use that to transport the troops. I asked Theron why he would send us on a road , marked ?RED? on the map, with a vehicle that was not land mine prepared. I was told by him to do as instructed. After everyone got onto the Unimorg, I then got on, but it was under duress. After driving for about an hour we approached a river with just a narrow wooden bridge. We sent the hippo over first and then everyone on the Unimog got off, as there were 19 in total on this vehicle and it was to heavy for this small bridge. I stayed behind and laid all the webbing on the flat bin of the Unimog for extra protection in case of mines. Which worked out to be a good thing, not knowing what was due to happen.

After driving again a further one and a half hours, we came to a clump of trees. We stopped and spoke about sending the hippo through first, as we had to go onto the road between the trees.The Hippo went through with no problems. Then we proceeded with the Unimog, as we got to the centre, we hit the landmine. I still believe that this mine was detonated, as they couldn?t see what was on the hippo but they could see all the troops on the Unimog. It was so loud that I did not hear anything. All I saw was smoke and flames. I was lucky to be blown off and landed on my feet on the ground. When I jumped up, I saw Van Tonder running closer with blood all over his face. He told me that there is still somebody on the vehicle. I shouted to him that I am going to fetch him. When I got there, it was Mark Nuwenhuis. The vehicle was by then in flames, and being stunned by the blast, he did not know which side to get off the truck. I jumped up onto the back of the vehicle and

threw him off . The heat was excruciating . When I got onto the ground and took him away, I was told that there is still someone else on the vehicle.

I could only see the soles of his boots moving. I decided to go back once more .On getting there, I saw it was Mattuschek. The heat was so much that I had to jump off again. When I hit the ground, I turned around and went back for the 3

rd time. When I got to him, he tried to get up. I said to him ? I am here Pal?. I grabbed him by the arms to drag him off, but could not get any grip, due to the burns, the skin came off. I then picked him up by his web belt, turned around and threw him closer to the back of the vehicle. As I jumped off the back I pulled him with me. I had Van Tonder come closer and we carried him away from the burning vehicle.

We did not get very far, when the first mortar started exploding and rounds were going off. Most of the firearms we had, were destroyed due to the explosion. There were some troops that was probing for landmines around the vehicle. We carried Mattushek to the tree where all the other injured were. Closer to the Unimorg we found the medic and Lt Brand working on Lt Larum. He was very badly injured in the explosion, as he was right on top of the gearbox that took the direct impact. His right leg was virtually blown off, we had put some drips on him, but I could see that there were possible internal injuries. The medic could not handle the smell of flesh burns, between Brand and the medic they were giving him mouth to mouth. Then I tried giving mouth to mouth as well, but the smell was terrible, we could not breathe over him. I tried for at least another half an hour, when eventually, he came to. Asking what happened. And then he would slip away again, that happened 3 or 4 times. Every time we told him, we are doing the best we can to help him, but unfortunatley he did not make it. One of the troops that was standing inbetween the driver and LT Larum, was also injured.

I had to keep myself busy as I was in pain with the heat burns on my face and arms. My hair was singed and my eyebrows and hair on my arms were gone.

We hit the mine at approx 4.45pm, (on the 13

th November 1975,). We sent the Hippo back with 5 guys. We had to give them firearms, we did not have much left for us that stayed behind. We lost all our radio equipment and most of our rifles in the blast. We cleared an opening for a chopper landing strip, which we marked with toilet paper, in the letter H, so that if they did come at night, they would at least be able to land there. These choppers would have come from Katimo Malilo, but they refused to fly that night. Our base camp knew at approx 7pm that night that we had hit a landmine.

Theron then sent a medical vehicle full of rifles and ammunition, but that never reached us due to problems on route. That was the longest night I have ever had in my life. By then we had guys with burns, and injuries and dead that we did not know how to sort out, if the choppers did not come to fetch them soon. Rfn Scheunfeldt, and his dog was there, but the dog had heat burns on his eyes, he could not see or smell due to his injuries , that could have helped us a lot if he was able, as he would have been able to detect terrorist activity in the area we were in.

We stayed under that tree. Every now and then, Mattushek would ask us for water, which we did not have. We would feed him the drip water, just to get some moisture into his mouth. The next morning, we decided to go and look for water. We knew the Luiane and Kwando river was either side of us, but we did not know how far. We then started walking, (4 of us), to see if we could find

water. After a short while, I suggested that we turn around, as I saw elephants walking in the opposite direction the previous evening. Call it what you want, but if we continued walking in that direction, we would have walked straight into an ambush.

We then found an omaramba, (which is a waterhole covered with grass), and managed to get water for Mattushek, and the others. We went back to the vehicle after that and took the damaged rifles off and stacked them in front of the Unimorg , then returned to the injured troops by the tree. We had Lt Larum wrapped up in a ground sheet, of sorts. I remember then, that while we were sitting there having a rest, Matthushek was calling BP Pretoruis. When BP Pretorious asked him what was wrong, he said ?Look at my arms, they look like dead leaves? . Then I recalled him saying ?BP, kyk daai 750 op die highway? and ? BP, gaan na die Roadhouse in Vereeniging en gaan koop vir ons ?n hamburger?.

The choppers only came the next day to collect the injured, and did not bring us any rifles or ammunition. I swore at the chopper pilot, who was a Major, and said to him, that it was easy for him to fly in and out and leave us there to F... die. He then threatend to lay a charge against me. I managed to get 2 rifles that he had with him. I also asked him why they did not bring a super freelong to take us all back one time but he did not answer me.

We were told that they would come and fetch us at any time if we had problems, but the response was that it was too dangerous, but I think that they were just shit scared. When the choppers left, we had 6 rifles, between 25 of us.

It was not very long after that, that we were attacked again. There were so many shots fired, we did not know if we should stand up or lie down. They hit us with rocket launchers and mortars, we tried to fight back but we did not have the fire power, or the equipment. There was a rifle with a rifles trim standing next to a tree, I jumped up to go and fetch it. On firing, it went quiet for a few seconds due to the explosion. We managed to shoot a couple of terrorists. There was a terrorist that stood on our burnt our vehicle giving instructions to his troops, he did not stand there for very long, needless to say, he was shot. Rfn Scheunfeldt, and his dog,and Retief, lost their lives in this shootout. ( Lt Brand removed their personal watches and dog tags to give to the authorities to return it to their families, as far as I know the watches were not returned to the family, as my wife worked with Rfn Scheunfeldt?s sister)

The first round I shot with the rifle that I got from the chopper pilot, got stuck in the barrel. I took a rifle from one of the troops as he was in shock and could not shoot and there were terrorists running towards us and we had to act fast. We had to withdraw swiftly. There were about 4 of us behind one tree trying to ward off the terrorists, while the others were retreating. By then we were running out of ammunition, and we had to split up. I gave the rifle to one of the smaller rifleman, and told him to run through the trees and hide in the omaramba. I was left with no rifle for defence. I then split up with everybody and fell back, running, the rounds were still flying around us. I was running 1 ? 2 steps, dive, 1 -2 steps, dive, did not know if I should stand or lie down due to mortar fire.

I went to sit against a tree on 3 occasions, I was so tired, that I thought that they can come and shoot me here now. Then my life history flashed through my mind in seconds, from the day I could

remember as being a small child till now, how I played with my little cars in the sand, and what will happen if I die? How would my parents feel?

I even took my dog tags off due to the shininess of the metal, so that it did not reflect in the sun. I then rolled in the sand with my army clothing that was so wet with perspiration, so that the sand could stick to it and I would blend in with my surroundings. As I got to the end of the clump of trees and was scared that I was going to run into an ambush, (as the terrorists had enough time overnight to surround us.) I decided to go into the open veld.

I ran as far as I could, and then fell down and thought I could hide behind the smallest bush that I can find, and that they would not find me there. Looking up, I saw a heap of sand, and remember saying to myself, if I ever get into trouble, I would crawl down an anteaters hole, (as some of them are big enough for me to hide in). I crawled towards the heap sand and found this hole, by that time it was midday. I got in the hole feet first, thought that if something was going to eat me, it would have to get through my soles of my boots first. I stayed there to just before dark. While lying there, I was terrified. I started to hear things above me as if there was a ?tribal dance?, ?stamping of feet?. A I asked, ?please God, I just need 2 seconds if they find me here. One, to get out of the hole and 2, to kill the guy closest to me.? The beating and the stamping got louder and louder. I decided just to crawl out. When I got out there was nothing and nobody to be seen, then I only realised that it was my heart beating so loudly. It was a great relief and then stayed there until it was dark.

I started walking at night, but had no direction. My only weapon was a branch of a tree that I could use as a club. Animals in the bush gave me an indication whether it was safe for me to walk. I eventually came back to the little road that we had travelled on but could not remember if I had to turn left or right. I turned left. As soon as I got the smell of the burnt out vehicle, I realised I was close to the site where we were ambushed. I just walked a little closer to see which side the vehicle was pointing to give me and indication of the direction of our camp. Walking back towards the trees I saw 2 bodies lying there.

I found a small bush on route that I could hide in at night. I remained close to the ambush site as I knew that they would come and look for us with the choppers. One morning, at about 5am I heard a shot go off. My first thought was, ? oh no not again?. I heard a voice screaming out, ?Waars julle manne? it was Lt Brands. I decided not to disclose my position and run over this grass plane towards them as it was too far and an open field.

After that, I do not know what happened to them. I woke up one morning, hearing vehicle noises, it would come and then go, come and go. I said to myself, ?I am going bossies?. ? Keep your mind active?. I started talking to myself so that I did not hear things that did not exist. It was not long after that , that I heard the vehicle noises again. And I said to myself, that I AM going bossies. But the noise came closer. I looked for a vehicle travelling along the road, but saw nothing. Then in a distance, I could hear it again, it was a chopper, but decided to stay where I was. The chopper was a blue. And the ones we used in operation were all green. A while after that I saw a green chopper, it flew over the proximity of our vehicle that was struck by a land mine, but it was a long way away and they would not be able to see me. I would still not come out of hiding, as there were shots fired that morning .

As the chopper turned to return to base, I went out into the veld and took my shirt off and waved at them. Then one of the chopper pilots saw me, and came straight towards me, I then lay down in the grass. They showed me to wait there and then brought another chopper in to pick me up. I was then flown away from there, and dropped off at a pick up point not far from there, where they had dropped off other guys. Eventually they flew in with a super freelong and picked us up and flew us back to base.

On arrival we went through medical checkups. They wanted to send some more troops back to sort out these terrorists and asked for volunteers to go with the reccies. We all volunteered again and got back onto the vehicles. While we were waiting for instructions to leave, a radio message came through to say that it was aborted and that they want us back in Grootfontien. We had to go for another operation ?orange?, deeper in Angola.

They then wanted to transport us back to Kwando on a vehicle. I refused. I said that we had already hit one mine, and that there was no ways I was going to travel on any road for anybody with any vehicle that was not landmine prepared. They asked if we expected to be flown out. Which I replied, ?yes?. We were then flown out.

It took 7 days to pick everyone up that was involved in that incident, some even walked all the way back to camp. Some of the troops were shot through their arms, some through the shoulders, and one had a bullet graze on his head.

From there they flew us out from Mapatcha to Grootfontein where we were told that we were going to fly into Angola with our 25 pounder guns. I had not been re-issued with kit, and went into Angola with only the clothes that I had on. The move to Angola was like a revenge for the guys we lost and got injured in the Caprivi. In Angola we did not take any prisoners.

Frikkie Bekker
design-a-tile@live.com
2011-11-28 03:10:25
1217Capt J A (John) Robinson was the pilot of a Puma shot down whilst doing trooping in southern-Angola on 5 January 1982. Co-pilot Lt M J Earp, flight engineer Sgt K G Dalgleish and 13 troops died as well.

2003-05-31 11:11:11
1222

22 Sep 1991: 88461033BG 2/Lieutenant Nathaniel Roesch from the Dog Training Centre died while assisting to extinguish a veld fire at the Dog Training Centre at Bourkes Luck. He was 19.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-22 12:51:39
1224Roetsie , ek onthou jou nog goed . Jou gesig nog altyd prominent in my foto albums en in my gedagtes ... Ek sal jou nooit vergeet nie .Eugene Liebenberg
ewl@ananzi .co.za
2007-06-18 14:10:30
1224Johan Roets. Een van my beste friende tydens die oorlog in Angola. Hy kom van Thabazimbi af, het daar groot geword en is daar begrawe. Dit wat met jou gebeur het was die wil van GOD en al het ons nie saam gestem met die bevel wat gegee is nie het ons voort gegaan vir die vryheid van ons land. Ons land is nie meer on eie nie maar sal wwer terug gekry word. Rus in vrede my vriendAlbert van Zyl
ramkat65@yahoo.com
2008-04-03 11:28:15
1224Johan. My Neef
Was jonger as ek, ek onthou die laaste keer toe ek jou gesien het, het ons krieket by oom Salie op die plaas gespeel. Ek was op `n weermag kamp toe jy begrawe is, Rus in vrede, Neef
Ben Snyman
snyman1959@hotmail.com
2013-04-22 06:04:23
122612 Sep 1987: 87953436CK Lance Corporal Stephen Lesley Roman from the South African Cape Corps was killed in a motor vehicle accident in Mamelodi, North of Pretoria. He was 21Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-12 12:47:09
1228

This is an account of the events that led to the death of Lt Roos.

In May 1966 the Air Force was making preparations for the celebration of the fifth anniversary of the Republic of South Africa, scheduled for 31 May. A fly-past of jet fighters sporting contrails in the colours of the national flag (Orange, white and blue) was contemplated. There was no problem in making blue and white contrails, but making an orange contrail was a challenge.

At that time I was doing a course at the Radar School at Waterkloof Air Force Base to become a ground radar operator. One day, I am not sure about the exact date, but it may have been on 26 May 1966, there was every now and then a F-86 Sabre flying low along the runway and making a contrail that was orange in colour, but turned green after a few seconds. It was obvious that the technical staff had difficulties in producing an orange colour and was experimenting with a liquid to inject into the exhaust of the jet engine that would give a contrail with an orange colour.

At about lunchtime, when the class was on the way to the mess, we observed how the Sabre came past again, but was at last producing a flawless, bright orange contrail, meaning that all the experimenting during the morning to produce the correct colour had been successful.

After this pass, the pilot made an approach as if to land, but then decided to make another fly-past, doing a low level double barrel \"victory\" roll, flying along the runway. This manoeuvre failed dismally and he flew straight into the ground in an upside down position front of our eyes.

We later learned that the unfortunate pilot was Lt IP Roos.

Piet Heyns
heynsp@mweb.com.na
2010-01-25 09:16:06
1229

I went to South Africa from England in 1974. I met Brian and we became firm friends. We did everything together until he had to do his National Service. He was 19 I think when he was killed. He was killed by a landmine.

Rest in peace buddy
ray g
alarmco2005@aol.com
2007-09-22 18:35:14
1229

I was with Brian when he died. We were members of a patrol (10 guys) in charge of a few kilometers of the Yati. Days were spent laying claymores and burying animals that had walked into them. In our area of responsibility was a watering hole, a miserable little hole with brackish brown water. But we were given only one fresh water bottle a day so we were very happy with our watering hole. Some days we swam, whilst one or two of the guys kept watch.

One day Gary and Brian were on watch. We were swimming and very close to us there was a huge explosion and dust. We flew out of the water and found Gary going in circles on all fours and Brian lying unconscious. They had wandered off for some reason and, I believe, walked into one of our own claymores, one that we had laid. We soon saw that Gary was not fatally hurt but that Brian was in trouble. He was unconscious. I do not believe that he was in pain or had any awareness of his situation. His wounds were not such that we could do anything, by that I mean he had small puncture wounds that were not bleeding profusely. We did mouth-to-mouth until the chopper arrived. I am sorry this all happened, so wasteful.

Brian was a quiet, modest guy. We liked him.

Bill Skelton
ublizi@gmail.com
2009-07-21 04:55:01
1231I was with Andrew and his buddies when he lost his life. Memories of that day are still clear and will be with me forever. Deepest sympathy to Andrews family and friends. Andrew you are not forgotten brother. I salute you. RIP.wayne
wayneforrester7@gmail.com
2017-03-02 05:33:59
1236CO A G Roux was killed on 10 Jul 82 as passenger in a Bosbok (950) that was flown by Lt O C Janse Van Rensburg and crashed at Oshigambo in SWAJohan Meyer
johanm@tsamail.co.za
2008-10-24 13:59:33
1237SGT Corrie Roux of De Wet Regiment was killed in action after an ambush just North of Osigambo in August 1979. He was the platoon SGT. We platoon of 26 troops, were on patrol and walked into an ambush about 10:00 in to the ambush. The Lt. was Mike Rossouw. Four others got wounded but not seriously. I was part of the patrol. SGT Corrie was the best SGT that I did serviced in my career as a rifleman. Nick
pcp177@goggaconnect
2008-04-13 10:13:41
1240

Charlie was a pilot for the Silver Falcons. During an airshow at Lanseria, the wing of his Impala separated. He ejected but did not survive. Strangely enough he had succesfully ejected earlier in his SAAF career.

Mike Glastonbury
mcglastonbury@comcast.net
2003-10-28 05:36:25
1243

As far as I know L/Cpl Ruthven was killed when a Buffel overturned on the Black River Parkway in Cape Town. We were doing township duty in and around Cape Town at the time. As far as I am concerned this death took place in the RSA and not in Namibia



2007-09-07 10:45:28
1243

16 Sep 1985: 73310724BT Lance Corporal Glen Stuart Ruthven from 3 Medical Battalion Group was killed when the Buffel Troop Carrier in which he was traveling overturned at Maitland. He was 28.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-16 05:53:05
1246

On 11 February 1985, a patrol from 32 Battalion's Charlie Company were in the vicinity of the Bale River, when their over-eager company commander took a short cut, against earlier advice from headquarters, and blundered straight into a well-prepared SWAPO base, manned by some 100 insurgents. In the 25 minute battle that ensued, Charlie Company suffered heavy casualties.

In all, 12 men from Charlie Company were killed in this action or died of their wounds soon afterwards, and many more were wounded. The seven fatalities in the inital contact were:

  • Lieutenant Dave Light (killed instantly by a bullet that struck him below his left eye).
  • Rifleman P. Kahete (severe schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman A. de Almeida (a gunshot that penetrated both lungs)
  • Rifleman P. Jose (multiple schrapnel wounds)
  • Rifleman K. Kalonga (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Rifleman J.C. Chihamba (multiple schrapnel wounds to head and torso)
  • Lance Corporal J.A. Sachilombo (multiple schrapnel wounds, including to abdomen)

After dark, while the casualties were being moved to a temporary emergency base, another three wounded men, all suffering from massive chest wounds, died. They were

  • Riflemen J. Fernando,
  • M. Joaquim and
  • M. Chipoya.
  • During the night another badly wounded Rifleman, M.A. Kinguelke, also died. The final death was that of Rifleman M. Muema, who succumbed to his schrapnel wounds at 10:00 the next morning.

    Later, radio intercepts indicated that SWAPO lost 15 men killed and a number wounded in this contact, and a further two SWAPO insurgents were killed by Charlie Company and one captured when they approached the base on the morning of 12th February.

    Information extracted from 32 Battalion: The Inside Story of South Africa's Elite Fighting Unit, by Piet Nortje.
Peter Chapman
chappiep@hotmail.com
2010-12-09 10:01:37
1248

Sadler was based at 101 Workshops in Grootfontein SWA (now Namibia).

He was known as "Boxer" to most of us.

I understand from a Lt. that he fell under the wheels of a supply vehicle while in Angola, and suffered major internal organ damage. He was not able to be helped medically for many hours due to a Communication breakdown, and unfortunately passed away due to internal injuries.

J.P.S.
somerly@aapt.net.au
2008-03-08 16:56:02
1254

22 Sep 1979: 76602804BG Rifleman William Ledgeton Saunders from 3 SAI died from a gunshot wound received as a result of the accidental discharge of a fellow soldiers rifle at Eenhana. He was 18.

Graham Du Toit
gcldt.udfres@webmail.co.za
2014-09-22 12:48:56
1256We were on an early morning log run from 55 Bn base Nepara to Rundu on the back of a Kwe 50 when a civilian vehicle approached on the same side of the road. Our driver swerved to the other side to avoid a head on collision but the civilian vehicle moved the same way forcing our truck off the side of the road and rolling crushing Hans Scheepers and Clifton Kilroe under it. They died instantly.Steve Poate
spoate@gmail.com
2016-04-22 12:43:29
1257Sktr JWC Scheepers was in our Platoon (PL 3. F Coy, 5 SAI Bn). Intake 07071982. He died whilst running our very first 2,4 km race. He was a short distance ahead of me, when he collapsed and fell to the ground. Our 2IB Lt Smit was riding a "dikwiel" bike, up and down the line of us troops, running this 2,4. He was 1st on the scene, and waved us on, instructed us to continue as medics were on the scene. Johan( if I remember correct, had signs of cyanosis as I passed the scene. We were later told that he had, a congenital heart disease, that went undetected. He was apparently a very fit individual, even had provincial colours for sport at school.  Dean Ridsdale
deanrids@absamail.co.za
2014-07-16 09:12:10
1258If i'm right, I think Scheepers was killed in a drowning accident at Ruacana while crossing the border. He was'nt in my unit but if I,m right, was in C company 2 SAI from Walvis Bayvic Betteridge
vic@dreamweavervisuals.co.za
2008-05-08 21:20:51
1258Vic Betteridge is quite correct. Rfn Scheepers was part of a group who were clearing all the islands downriver from Calueque Dam and fell into the water and drowned. He was with 2 SAI Bn Gp.B G Kirby
slaapstad@hotmail.com
2010-08-09 21:09:23
1258L J de Wit Scheepers was part of Charlie Company 2 SAI. On the 6th September 1975, we were crossing the Cunene river , North of Ruacana. The river flow was quite strong, and we were all crossing in a line, the water level was about chest height, making the water pressure stronger against our bodies, we had to hold our rifles up in the air and could only move along the rope with one hand. Scheepers was one of the smaller chaps in our company, and he was washed away in the river, His body was later recovered. May his soul rest in Peace. Mark Goller
markantgol@gmail.com
2015-05-29 06:44:08
1265

Ben was a section leader on patrol in the Jati strip North of Umbalantu. His section came under heavy enemy fire at evening "klaarstaan" at their TB. Ben was wounded in the neck and although a CASEVAC was arranged, he died of his injuries. He was with Regiment Noord Natal.



2002-03-09 15:56:23
1266Captain George Schoeman was a member of the SADF advance force in Angola, in what came to be known as Operation Savannah. This was the SADF intervention during the early stages of the civil war being fought in that country, after the Portuguese had pulled out. During the battle for Novo Redondo in early November 1975, Capt Schoeman was severely wounded by a mine, and subsequently died of his wounds in No.1 Military Hospital in Voortrekkerhoogte. Peter Chapman
chappiep@hotmail.com
2006-03-10 07:15:18
1266

Capt Schoeman was injured when he stepped on a landmine. The incident took place on the T junction on the east west road leading to Lobito. The north road went to Luanda. The enemy had placed landmines on the road but our armoured cars were able work around them easily. Capt Schoeman was walking on the road and as a vehicle approached him , he stepped off the road onto the soft shoulder and stood on the mine. The incident occurred in mid November 1975. He was buried in Zeerust.

Mike James
Mjames0255@msn.com
2008-11-20 09:54:35
1266

I did my National Service at 2 Special Service Battalion in Zeerust. I was called up in July 1974. 2SSB had only one intake a year which was July.

During that time Taljaard, Vollgraaf, me and about six others opted to take the 18 or 24 month National Service option. This would have exempted us from camps and there was a bonus that was paid out upon completion of the service.

On October 8, 1975, nine of us were called into the Officer Commanding?s office and told that we were going to Bloemfontein that night. Capt Schoeman, Cpl Taljaard, Tpr Vollgraaf were part of this group.

We traveled to Bloemfontein and when we got there, we were merged with personnel from 1SSB to form a squadron. We were allocated Eland 90?s which were prepared for travel.

About two days later the squadron left Bloemfontein for Grootfontein in the then South West Africa. At that time it was abnormal to have a squadron made up of entirely Eland 90?s. Normally one troop had 90?s and the rest were Eland 60?s (Mortars).

When we arrived in Grootfontein we settled into our tents. Then we all went to see a movie at the base. When we returned to our quarters we found that all the cars had been painted in camouflage markings and that the registration numbers had been erased.

The following morning the squadron was called to a presentation at the mess. A brigadier told us that we were going into Angola on a covert operation to assist UNITA to defeat the MPLA. We had to sign the Official Secrets Act at the time. It was made quite clear to us that we had to volunteer for the task and anybody who did not want to go could remain at the base. One person did remain behind.

We were issued with green uniforms (similar to prison issue at the time) and tennis shoes. Anything that we took with us into Angola had to have any reference to South Africa erased. It meant that labels on food cans had to be removed, wording scratched off other items.

The cars were ?bombed? up (loaded) with ammunition.

Over a period of a few days we and the equipment were flown to Silva Porto in Angola. When we arrived there we drove to a prison out the town. The prison was used as a training camp for UNITA soldiers. They were to provide the ground troop support for us. They were trained by Recces.

About two weeks later we started to head for Lobito taking one town at a time.

During the time I was there until December 1975 we had six contacts. Our group suffered no casualties until Capt Schoeman was injured. About 3 UNITA soldiers were killed or wounded as we progressed to Lobita.

Our biggest loss was incurred north of Ebo on 24 November 1975. We heard shortly after that Ebo engagement that Capt Schoeman had died from his injuries just before the 24th.

He was a very quiet man and was very safety conscious when it came to his troops. One car in Angola rolled down a bank and he told the crew to test the 90mm gun. But they had to tie a very long piece of rope to the firing lever and fire the gun from behind a tree.

If had survived long enough to hear that Taljaard and Vollgraaf had been killed in action, I believe that he would have been heartbroken.

Out of the nine of us who left Zeerust, three were killed, two injured and the rest came home in one piece.

It was a very tough journey.

Thanks

Mike James
Mjames0255@msn.com
2008-11-20 10:18:43
1266I served my time at 2SSB from July 1975 to June 1976. After a number of gruelling drills, I was privelidged to march as guard of honour for Captain Schoeman. Shortly thereafter I was sent to 1SSB to train in Eland's and became a gunner, i was previously trained as a trooper. I met Cpl Taljaard but was never informed of his passing.
I went into Angola shortly after Christmas 1975 and returned in March of 1976. I will never forget when given a 13 day pass, and went to Joburg to get my flight to Durban, what it was like to stand on a street corner and just watch the traffic and people in general. After 3 months in Angola and returning to "civvy" street was certainly a realization of the intensity of being in an unknown world. Especially at the age of 18 !!!
Steven Jacobs
mwjacobssp@mweb.co.za
2010-11-29 16:14:57
1267

We were on patrol in the townships just outside Port Elizabeth in September 1985. Cpl Schoeman was the platoon Sargeant of Platoon Four, Delta Company (5 SAI). I was in Charlie Section, Platoon Five.

We were at the end of our 12 hours of duty in the township and our buffel met up with the one that Cpl Schoeman was riding in. We chatted to the guys in his buffel and we agreed that we would do one more ride around and then head for home.

We waited for the other buffel to join us after about half an hour and when we had heard nothing from them, we set out to find them.

We noticed a bunch of young children (about 10-15 years old) gathered in a crowd down a side road. They all scattered when we approached, and revealed the mutilated a body on the road. It was Cpl Schoeman. He was still alive when we got to him. He had been stabbed 75 times, castrated and disembowled. There were pieces of flesh missing from his buttocks and an axe embedded in his forehead.

He died while we were waiting for the ambulance.

Apparently, he had joined with his section in chasing after some people who had thrown stuff at the Buffel, and had got seperated from them. He had not taken his personal weapon with him, and could not defend himself.

John Dovey
dovey.john@gmail.com
2001-05-30 13:37:59
1268Gustav matriculated in 1979 at Hoerskool Upington. We were class mates. He studied at the University of the Free State and was doing a camp with the Regiment University of the Free State at the time of his death, seconded to 61 Mech Bn. He died in a tragic accident at night during operation Askari. I was not present at the time of his death, but saw him a few days before he died. He was a gentle man. He died on 21 December 1983 and must have been 22 years old. Niel de Villiers
nieldevilliers1@gmail.com
2014-07-25 05:35:09
1271

Please see the story posted for Lt C.J. Robin for the story.

Duncan Mattushek
mattushek@xtra.co.nz
2010-04-08 23:44:16
1272

Were killed when a mortar round hit the rollbar of their buffel on the 31/12/83.

Doug Beveridge
doug@bever-d.demon.co.uk
2008-12-05 09:36:52
1272

Killed in Action 31st December 1983

Niel Wiid
niel@systemiclogic.net
2009-10-24 12:12:57
1273Sydney S. Scully [ different spelling ] attended glenwood high school in durban from 1932 - 1935 and died at worcester in 1963 . He was born 25 / 10 /1917 .

2001-05-30 13:37:59
1275Deon Schutte was my Sisters fiance, he was based out near the Mozambique border. Apparently one of his coloured troops who was denied his medicines earlier in the day took another troop hostage. Deon was woken up in the middle of the night and asked to intervene he tried negotiating with(R4 RIFLE) the troop but was shot and mortally wounded through the chest. He was from Springs on the East Rand near Joburg. Another young life sacrificed for nothing.
Jacques Badenhorst
jacques.badenhorst08@gmail.com
2012-04-15 10:53:15
1276

Jan Jurgens Roets SCHUTTE, 16 Aug 1958 Springs - 23 Aug 1978 Katima Mulilo, seun van Stefanus Johannes Bester SCHUTTE en Johanna Susanna Maria VENTER.

Hy is oorlede tydens die Grens-oorlog toe PLAN (Swapo se gewapende vleuel) Katima Mulilo met 122mm vuurpyle vanuit Zambia aangeval het in die vroee oggend ure van 23 Augustus 1978. Dertig vuurpyle is afgevuur op die dorp waarvan slegs 2 skade aangerig het. Die een vuurpyl het 'n skool in die swart woonbuurt beskadig en die ander een het 'n bungalow in die militere basis getref. In die bungalow is 10 soldate gedood (waarvan Jan Jurges Roets Schutte een was) en 10 ander verwond ("South Africa's Border War, 1966 - 1989" deur Willem Steenkamp bl. 80). Hy was ongetroud. Sy naam verskyn op die ere-rol van gesneuweldes by Fort Klapperkop in Pretoria.

Johan Le Grange
bellvillesuid@gmail.com
2009-05-20 12:44:25
1276

My name is Bobby Thomson. I was in Katima Mulilo that night. I was a gunner and served at the mortar locating radar (32 Loc Battery) which was situated on a tower next to the heli pad. The second red eye landed between us and the heli-pad . We then directed fire onto pre-listed targets along the river and in Sesheke and the guns at golf wiped out all their long and medium range weapons within the first 10 - 15 minutes after the attack. I remember that we were in a direct line between Golf firebase and some of the targets in Zambia. We would see the firing of the guns, then hear the shells come overhead and hear the explosions when they landed. Lt Schalekamp gave mopping-up fire orders the next day. The next day we went to look at the bungalow and what we saw remained with me for many a year after that.

Bobby Thomson
warringtons@eccsystems.co.za
2011-07-30 10:53:10
1276 I remember it distinctly. The run-up to the attack was as follows: After the successful operation Reindeer and the battle at Cassinga or (Moscow and Vietnam) bases, SWAPO had to do something to save face and they came up with Ops Revenge. The strategy was to attack and annihilate Katima Mulilo, Wenela, Golf and Mpacha. A force of SWAPO and Zambian military personnel and equipment was gathered on the other side of the river and longer range weapons were positioned along the riverbank between Sesheke and their border post "Katima Mulilo" which was situated just across the newly scraped no-mans land from Wenela Base, which in turn was situated at the point where the Zambezi River turns into Zambia and the so-called Kaplyn started. I was a Gunner and at the time part of a mortar locating crew. We had come to the Caprivi around three months before and were first situated at Golf and Wenela. One day we were still quietly going about our business when the Genie invaded our camp and began to dig in the Ops room and other key buildings and positions. At the time we should have realized that something was happening, but no information was passed on to us. A couple of weeks later a third set was flown up from South Africa and a tower was built at Katima to raise the screen up on to. Our group was then moved to Katima and we began registering enemy positions along the riverbank using the Cymbeline Radar Set to do so. At that time, there were no known co-odinates that could be used to survey in any of our gun positions or those of the Radar Set which would be necessary to be able to give adjustments to the guns at Golf and/or, the mortars at Romeo Zulu which was situated out of town along the river. This was soon remedied as a surveying team arrived from SA and used the known co-ordinates at Mpacha as a base and performed what we called then "trekmeet" all the way from Mpacha to the Radar Platform at Katima, the base at Golf and the mortars at Romeo Zulu. At least we were now on the same grid. From these known points a map of the area was drawn and the co-ordinates of the enemy positions were registered onto the map. Seeing as the Cymbeline could also pick up any metal, we could plot the movement of motorvehicles and equipment across the river and even were able to plot dust roads and paths over a period of time as the people and equipment followed the road and the co-ords could be plotted. When equipment stopped moving and stayed at a position, those positions were listed as possible enemy positions and were registered as targets.This information was also updated onto the other maps at Golf and Romeo Zulu on a regular basis. One day, on the way back from Wenela to Katima, a SWAPO soldier walked out of the bush at the side of the road and handed himself over to us. He was bristling with weapons, had a new set of camo???s on and was fully kitted out. He said that he had been promised that he would be able to go to university in Moscow if he joined and spent some time with the ???Freedom Fighters??? . He stated that he had been with Swapo for three years now and that most of that time they had not had much to eat and that the promises that had been made were not realizing. His kit was full of food at the time, which was totally the opposite of what he was saying and he explained that they had just been issued with new kit, weapons, food etc, but that he had had enough and had decided to hand himself over. We took him to Katima and handed him over to the Intelligence Officer at the base and I believe he supplied them with some much needed info concerning the build-up of forces across the river. So we spent our days at Katima, waiting for the end of our stint. As was always the case in later years, the gunners and the guys from the armour regiments befriended each other as both were and would always be minority groups wherever we served. We played many soccer games against each other and so-doing some of us made some good friends with them. If I remember correctly, trooper Elworthy was an excellent soccer player and had been selected for some or other SADF soccer team as well. Our Radar set was situated at the North Eastern corner of the base and the armour guys were situated on the South eastern side. So, the days went by and we heard that the armour guys were going home. One night , just before their ???aflos??? arrived, the guns were fired at some ???targets??? on the Kaplyn as an exercise and I believe a donkey was killed by mistake. A week or two later, their ???aflos??? arrived and the armour guys had a braai on their last night, the 23rd of August 1978. We said Good Bye to them and they carried on with their braai. If I remember correctly, the guys that were leaving were told to bed down in the bungalows opposite the mess and the new guys took up their duties in the vacated positions. We all wen to bed and at 01h15 all hell broke loose. I remember waking up to a searing sound and then hearing an explosion not far from our position. This was the first 122mm red eye fired on us and it landed in a mielie field behind the base. It was most probably the fastest I have ever moved and we got to our positions even before the next rocket fell. To start the generator of the Radar Set, one had to get up onto the platform and start it there. I can???t remember who did, but the set was immediately started up and we waited for the next shots. From our positions we could hear the bang as the rocket was fired, see the flames of the rocket motor raising up into the sky and then the motor died . The second rocket descended and fell on the Bungalow opposite the mess. It broke through the roof and as per some armament specialists later, exploded about 1 meter above the floor in the bungalow. At that specific moment, many guys were either running toward the specific part of the bungalow where the missile would hit, or were leaving the bungalow. The reason for this was that the bungalow was designed with two exits, one on each side of the long side of the rectangular building, which meant that all personnel had to move to the centre of the building. It was exactly at that point where the rocket hit. If the rocket had hit the bungalow first or if a later rocket had hit the bungalow, there would have been far less effect. At the time, we only heard the explosion, but did not know the effect of it. With the radar up and running, we started giving through target co-ords to the guns at Golf. One of the prime targets was the ferry across the river on which SWAPO and the Zambian army were now ferrying troops, equipment and supplies across the river. I believe the guns took out the fully loaded ferry with the second shot, effectively stopping the stream of troops, equipment and supplies from reaching the near bank. I believe that this was most probably the most important shot of the battle and turned the odds in our favour. After that initial target, we gave through co-ords of all the registered positions along the bank and systematically wiped out the positions, one by one. During this period, we would hear the bangs of the rockets being fired, see the ???red-eye??? in the sky and soon learnt if we needed to take cover or not. Some writers about this incident state that it was mortar fire, but as a gunner, we were well aware of what shrapnel from a shell looked like vs the shrapnel we picked up the next day which definitely was not the same and was identified as coming from a 122mm rocket. I am not stating that there was no mortar fire, but the explosions around us were definitely from ???red-eyes???. About 20 minutes later, we had effectively silenced the positions along the riverbank and the guns started firing at targets around the town of Sesheke, which is roughly opposite Katima Mulilo on the far bank of the Zambezi. I remember that there was an officer that was either looking after the civilians or had quite a lot to do with them while bomb shelters were being built on the southern side of their houses. In the town there was a microphone system and he was consistently warning the civvies and appealing to them to move to the shelters and if they did not have one yet, to take cover on the southern side of their houses. He must have come from the Boland as he rolled his RR???s and supplied some sort of comic relief during these hours. We would listen to the radio and when the command to fire was given, look toward Golf. The night sky would light up, looking like an intense lightning storm, moments later we would hear the whistle of the shells above us and then hear the massive explosions as they hit their targets on the other side of the river. Experiencing that was and still gives me goose bumps. The unadulterated destructive power of those shells is absolutely awesome. I must say that after SWAPO and the Zambian army stopped firing on us, the effect of those shots coming over was extremely heart warming. The firing continued sporadically throughout the early hours of the morning as new targets were identified and fired upon. Lieutenant (at the time) Schalekamp, joined us and later climbed up onto the water tower to give us the co-ords of visible targets and corrections once the first shots had been fired. He spent some time mopping up wherever he found anything worth firing upon. Later that morning we were told that we could go and get something to eat and the bad news of the bungalow being hit was heard. On arriving at the mess and seeing the bungalow, my life changed in an instant. The bungalow was a mess. Parts of the building, kit, you name it, was strewn across the ground. There was a guy who had been appointed to keep the vultures at bay. At the time we did not know it, but ten of our friends and comrades had been killed and another 10 or 20 injured. There was blood everywhere. Most of the dead and injured had been removed from the area, but the evidence of the ferocity of the blast was to be seen everywhere. Standing in line for breakfast, the coffee can was positioned long before the food and guys would fill up their mugs while waiting for their food. While standing there that morning, some idiot pulled off a shot and everybody dived for cover with hot tea and coffee flying everywhere and burning some of the guys. We all sat and ate in silence and went back to our positions. What I had seen that morning has stayed with me all my life since. It has influenced many of my decisions in my life. In many cases the effect has been negative. The loss of life of those troopers that night, guys whom you shared a part of your life with, played soccer with, ate with, joked with, worked with, just suddenly gone, left a scar. The next day the follow-up went into Zambia and a day or two later they brought a truckload of bodies back. I wanted to see what these guys looked like and wanted to see their dead, possibly to satisfy a feeling of retribution. I walked over to the truck and getting closer I could smell death. I looked at these bodies, my enemy, and seeing them like that felt no remorse, no sympathy. They were all in various stages of rigor mortise and were later layed out on the parade ground for the intelligence guys to inspect. The base at Katima is quite close to a township and we were told that part of our tasks were to protect the local population. Funny though, that night there was not a single person in the township. They had known and I could not understand why they had not told us, seeing as new were their ???protectors???. For many years I walked around with an ingrown mistrust of all black people as I could not understand the issues. Furthermore, the fact that we had killed some of the enemy never made up for the losses we had had. It felt as if the guys that were killed died in vain. Especially after 1994. It is only now, and I thank Arn Durand for giving me the answer, that I can say the following: No, they did not die as part of a well known Op, firing on the enemy and walking away as heroes into the sunset. But, they died, running to get to their weapons, ready to serve their country, ready to take part in a battle that was never given a name, but surely would have been given one, had SWAPO and the Zambian Army been able to succeed in their strategy of retribution for Cassinga. KJ BIGGS, HW DE LANGE, AH ERASMUS, GP ERASMUS, JL LESCH, JJR SCHUTTE, GJ SMIT, WS SMUTS, AD VAN DER MERWE, DM ELWORTHY, WHC BRITZ Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres, There is music in the midst of desolation And a glory that shines upon our tears. They went with songs to the battle, they were young, Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted; They fell with their faces to the foe. They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them. They mingle not with their laughing comrades again; They sit no more at familiar tables of home; They have no lot in our labour of the day-time; They sleep beyond Englands foam.Bobby Thomson
warringtons@eccsystems.co.za
2015-08-06 04:20:05
1277On 11 November 1987 the leading elements of Combat Group Charlie (4SAI) came under small-arms fire during the afternoon during their attack on FAPLA. They replied with their vehicle machine-guns, causing serious casualties. One Ratel of A Company found itself face to face with a T-55. The gunner, Rifleman Marius Mitton, had immediately started to fire at the tank with a cool and deliberate mind aimed at the weak junction between the turret and the hull. With his 20mm armour-piercing ammunition, he kept up his rate of fire until the tank started to brew and burst out in flames. Unfortunately though, another T-55 hit the Ratel of Rfn. Mitton with its 100mm gun, its 100mm projectile smashed through the windscreen and killed the driver of the Ratel, Piet Schutte, with Rfn. Mitton severly wounded. Rfn. Mitton realized that the Ratel was lost but not that Piet Schutte had been killed. He elevated the 20mm gun to allow Piet to escape through his hatch, and then tried to see whether Piet needed help, but could not see him in the smoking vehicle. He struggled out of his own hatch and fell off the Ratel, as he had lost one of his legs from the blow, but did not realise it at that stage. Several members of the section dragged him and the wounded section leader clear of the burning Ratel and gave first aid until they were evacuated. Marius Mitton died on 25 November 1987 of his wounds in 1 Military Hospital, Pretoria Danie Klonus
dklonus@gmail.com
2010-09-23 20:43:16
1277Piet Schutte was his parents only son. He came from Lichtenburg and is also laid to rest there. I fondly recall him as a mildly mannered and well behaved guy. The last close conversation I had with him before that fateful day was during an evening while we were roasting chunks of frozen beef over an open fire. We sat with our legs hanging in a foxhole, making small talk and jests. I am still moved by his untimely death. We stood utterly bewildered on the battlefield that day, receiving the news of his passing midst the carnage. We turned and watched his raging funeral pyre and as we were watching a tank mine inside the Ratel exploded, blowing the spare wheel high above the wreckage as if in a final salute.P F Botha
drpfbotha45@gmail.com
2016-10-31 06:35:00
1278

Towards the end of 1987 two platoons of D Company (Jan 1986 ? Dec 1987), 1 Parachute Battalion were seconded to 5 Reconnaissance Regiment. The platoons were under command of Capt PA Pienaar (Pine), 2IC of D Coy and the platoon commanders were Lt J de V Kruys and 2Lt F J Wiese.

Together with members of 5 and 2 Reconnaissance Regiments, the members of D Coy took part in an attack on a Swapo base in central Angola. The operation was named Ops Firewood.

The attack commenced at dawn on 31 October 1987 and the SA forces only withdrew after dark on the same day. It was estimated that more than 300 Swapo fighters were killed during the battle.

At the end of the day Cpl N S Olivier, L/Cpl R M Light, Rfn H N de Rose, Rfn D W van Rooyen and Rfn W F Ewels were dead, killed in action. Several other members of D Coy was also wounded during the battle and Rfn J m Schuurman died on 1 November 1987 of his wounds.

Capt P A Pienaar the 2IC of D Coy who was in charge of the two platoons was killed in West Africa almost 10 years later, on 29 October 1997.

The names of these members of D Coy appear on the Wall of Remembrance at 1 Parachute Battalion in Bloemfontein.

We remember our comrades who paid the highest price on that day in 1987. They were all heroes and proud paratroopers.

Ex Alto Vincimus - We Conquer from Above



2003-08-28 14:17:33
1279

16 Sep 1982: 76442722BG Rifleman Gabriel Johannes Schwartz from Infantry School was killed in a military vehicle accident at Otjiwarongo. He was 21.

Graham Du Toit